7

I have a X509Certificate2 variable and I'm trying to cast the private key of the variable to a RSACryptoServiceProvider

RSACryptoServiceProvider pkey = (RSACryptoServiceProvider)cert.PrivateKey;

However I get this exception.

System.InvalidCastException: 'Unable to cast object of type 'System.Security.Cryptography.RSACng' to type 'System.Security.Cryptography.RSACryptoServiceProvider'.'

It's weird that this happens because other answers in SO suggested the same procedure as mine but I get an exception. Any solutions to this?

15
  • 1
    The docs say "it is not a drop-in replacement for existing uses of RSACryptoServiceProvider." So it looks like you'll need to cast it to a RSACng instead and work with that. If this API (I don't know it) can return either of them then you'll need to check the type at runtime e.g. using as.
    – Rup
    May 2 '19 at 9:37
  • 1
    Then you'll either have to change the next operations to work with an RSACng too (if that's possible) or debug what you've got to find out why you're getting a RSACng and not an RSACryptoServiceProvider as you'd expect. At first glance from the reference source it doesn't look like it can give you an RSACng: referencesource.microsoft.com/#system/security/system/security/… Which version of .NET is this? Are you setting the PrivateKey property yourself or letting the class create it from data it's parsing?
    – Rup
    May 2 '19 at 10:32
  • 1
    Deleting my answer in light of question elucidation. I'll take another look :)
    – James
    May 2 '19 at 10:38
  • 1
    Could you try this for me: RSAParameters RSAParams = cert.ExportParameters(true);. I dont know much about the RSACng object but the documentation suggests that this will export the key information into a RSAParams object which is what I think you should be aiming for.
    – James
    May 2 '19 at 10:48
  • 1
    No, it's on the RSA interface which both RSACng and RSACryptoProviderService implement. Cast the .privateKey to an RSA and call ExportParameters on that.
    – Rup
    May 2 '19 at 10:59
7

So after a few tries and discussions in the comments I came up with the following solution.

            RSA rsa = (RSA)cert.PrivateKey;
        (cert.PrivateKey as RSACng).Key.SetProperty(
            new CngProperty(
                "Export Policy",
                BitConverter.GetBytes((int)CngExportPolicies.AllowPlaintextExport),
                CngPropertyOptions.Persist));

        RSAParameters RSAParameters = rsa.ExportParameters(true);                      

        AsymmetricCipherKeyPair keypair = DotNetUtilities.GetRsaKeyPair(RSAParameters);

The problem was that the variable rsa wasn't exportable. To change this I set a new CngProperty for the export policy. Works perfectly now

1
  • 2
    You probably need to make the (cert.PrivateKey as RSACng).Key bit conditional on (cert.PrivateKey is RSACng) as if you ever do get an RSACryptoServiceProvider (or an RSAOpenSsl) then there'll be an NullPointerException here. But glad you got this working!
    – Rup
    May 2 '19 at 12:56
4

Just wanted to note that there's also an extension method that can be used:

using System.Security.Cryptography.X509Certificates;

...

//certificate is a X509Certificate2
using (var rsa = certificate.GetRSAPrivateKey())
{
  //the var rsa is an RSA object
  //...
}
1

In my case the same problem was happening when trying to convert local store certificate to RSACryptoServiceProvider as below:

RSACryptoServiceProvider encryptProvider = 
                         certificate.PrivateKey as RSACryptoServiceProvider;

Issue fixed by using RSA instead of RSACryptoServiceProvider.


Putting instructions here in case if someone will be curious how to do that )).

To store some certificate into your machine open Visual Studio Developer Command and type following:

makecert -n "CN=JohnDoe" -sr currentuser -ss someCertStore

...where you can specify and values instead of "JohnDoe" and "demoCertStore".

Now you can use the below code to access certificates from the local certificate store:

public class Program
{
    static void DumpBytes(string title, byte[] bytes)
    {
        Console.Write(title);
        foreach (byte b in bytes)
        {
            Console.Write("{0:X} ", b);
        }

        Console.WriteLine();
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        // This will convert our input string into bytes and back
        var converter = new ASCIIEncoding();

        // Get a crypto provider out of the certificate store
        // should be wrapped in using for production code
        var store = new X509Store("someCertStore", StoreLocation.CurrentUser);

        store.Open(OpenFlags.ReadOnly);

        // should be wrapped in using for production code
        X509Certificate2 certificate = store.Certificates[0];

        RSA rsa = (RSA)certificate.PrivateKey;
        (certificate.PrivateKey as RSACng)?.Key.SetProperty(
                                                new CngProperty(
                                                    "Export Policy",
                                                    BitConverter.GetBytes((int)CngExportPolicies.AllowPlaintextExport),
                                                    CngPropertyOptions.Persist));

        string messageToSign = "This is the message I want to sign";
        Console.WriteLine("Message: {0}", messageToSign);
        byte[] messageToSignBytes = converter.GetBytes(messageToSign);

        // need to calculate a hash for this message - this will go into the
        // signature and be used to verify the message
        // Create an implementation of the hashing algorithm we are going to us
        // should be wrapped in using for production code
        DumpBytes("Message to sign in bytes: ", messageToSignBytes);
        HashAlgorithm hasher = new SHA1Managed();

        // Use the hasher to hash the message
        byte[] hash = hasher.ComputeHash(messageToSignBytes);
        DumpBytes("Hash for message: ", hash);

        // Now sign the hash to create a signature
        byte[] signature = rsa.SignHash(hash, HashAlgorithmName.SHA1, RSASignaturePadding.Pss);
        DumpBytes("Signature: ", messageToSignBytes);

        // Now use the signature to perform a successful validation of the mess
        bool validSignature = rsa.VerifyHash(hash: hash,
                                             signature: signature,
                                             hashAlgorithm: HashAlgorithmName.SHA1,
                                             padding: RSASignaturePadding.Pss);
        Console.WriteLine("Correct signature validated OK: {0}", validSignature);

        // Change one byte of the signature
        signature[0] = 99;

        // Now try the using the incorrect signature to validate the message
        bool invalidSignature = rsa.VerifyHash(hash: hash,
                                               signature: signature,
                                               hashAlgorithm: HashAlgorithmName.SHA1,
                                               padding: RSASignaturePadding.Pss);

        Console.WriteLine("Incorrect signature validated OK: {0}", invalidSignature);
        Console.ReadKey();
}
0

You can avoid the code that is setting the export policy altogether by simply creating the certificate with the export policy already being correct. I used the New-SelfSignedCertificate PowerShell utility to create a certificate that was exportable from inception.
PS C:>New-SelfSignedCertificate -CertStoreLocation "Cert:\CurrentUser\" -Subject "CN=JUSTIN" -KeyExportPolicy Exportable

This negates the need for:

(certificate.PrivateKey as RSACng)?.Key.SetProperty(new CngProperty("Export Policy", BitConverter.GetBytes((int)CngExportPolicies.AllowPlaintextExport),CngPropertyOptions.Persist));

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