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I'm trying to build a macro that does some code transformation, and should be able to parse its own syntax. Here is the simplest example I can think of:

replace!(x, y, x * 100 + z) ~> y * 100 + z

This macro should be able to replace the first identifier with the second in the expression provided as third parameter. The macro should have some understanding of the language of the third parameter (which in my particular case, as opposed to the example, wouldn't parse in Rust) and apply recursively over it.

What's the most effective way to build such a macro in Rust? I'm aware of the proc_macro approach and the macro_rules! one. However I am not sure whether macro_rules! is powerful enough to handle this and I couldn't find much documentation in how to build my own transformations using proc_macro. Can anyone point me in the right direction?

  • "Can anyone point me in the right direction?" This is a dangerous statement to make in a SO question. It is best to make some attempts of your own and narrow the problem down to a more specific concern. – E_net4 the unsafe May 2 '19 at 12:18
  • Thanks! however I made my own attempt at a solution using macro_rules!, which is the one that's most documented. I got stuck exactly at that point, not being able to find a way to do this matching. Shall I share my attempt? – hoheinzollern May 2 '19 at 12:41
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Solution with macro_rules! macro

To implement this with declarative macros (macro_rules!) is a bit tricky but possible. However, it's necessary to use a few tricks.

But first, here is the code (Playground):

macro_rules! replace {
    // This is the "public interface". The only thing we do here is to delegate
    // to the actual implementation. The implementation is more complicated to
    // call, because it has an "out" parameter which accumulates the token we
    // will generate.
    ($x:ident, $y:ident, $($e:tt)*) => {
        replace!(@impl $x, $y, [], $($e)*)
    };

    // Recursion stop: if there are no tokens to check anymore, we just emit
    // what we accumulated in the out parameter so far.
    (@impl $x:ident, $y:ident, [$($out:tt)*], ) => {
        $($out)*
    };

    // This is the arm that's used when the first token in the stream is an
    // identifier. We potentially replace the identifier and push it to the
    // out tokens.
    (@impl $x:ident, $y:ident, [$($out:tt)*], $head:ident $($tail:tt)*) => {{
        replace!(
            @impl $x, $y, 
            [$($out)* replace!(@replace $x $y $head)],
            $($tail)*
        )
    }};

    // These arms are here to recurse into "groups" (tokens inside of a 
    // (), [] or {} pair)
    (@impl $x:ident, $y:ident, [$($out:tt)*], ( $($head:tt)* ) $($tail:tt)*) => {{
        replace!(
            @impl $x, $y, 
            [$($out)* ( replace!($x, $y, $($head)*) ) ], 
            $($tail)*
        )
    }};
    (@impl $x:ident, $y:ident, [$($out:tt)*], [ $($head:tt)* ] $($tail:tt)*) => {{
        replace!(
            @impl $x, $y, 
            [$($out)* [ replace!($x, $y, $($head)*) ] ], 
            $($tail)*
        )
    }};
    (@impl $x:ident, $y:ident, [$($out:tt)*], { $($head:tt)* } $($tail:tt)*) => {{
        replace!(
            @impl $x, $y, 
            [$($out)* { replace!($x, $y, $($head)*) } ], 
            $($tail)*
        )
    }};

    // This is the standard recusion case: we have a non-identifier token as
    // head, so we just put it into the out parameter.
    (@impl $x:ident, $y:ident, [$($out:tt)*], $head:tt $($tail:tt)*) => {{
        replace!(@impl $x, $y, [$($out)* $head], $($tail)*)
    }};

    // Helper to replace the identifier if its the needle. 
    (@replace $needle:ident $replacement:ident $i:ident) => {{
        // This is a trick to check two identifiers for equality. Note that 
        // the patterns in this macro don't contain any meta variables (the 
        // out meta variables $needle and $i are interpolated).
        macro_rules! __inner_helper {
            // Identifiers equal, emit $replacement
            ($needle $needle) => { $replacement };
            // Identifiers not equal, emit original
            ($needle $i) => { $i };                
        }

        __inner_helper!($needle $i)
    }}
}


fn main() {
    let foo = 3;
    let bar = 7;
    let z = 5;

    dbg!(replace!(abc, foo, bar * 100 + z));  // no replacement
    dbg!(replace!(bar, foo, bar * 100 + z));  // replace `bar` with `foo`
}

It outputs:

[src/main.rs:56] replace!(abc , foo , bar * 100 + z) = 705
[src/main.rs:57] replace!(bar , foo , bar * 100 + z) = 305

How does this work?

There are two main tricks one need to understand before understanding this macro: push down accumulation and how to check two identifiers for equality.

Furthermore, just to be sure: the @foobar things at the start of the macro pattern are not a special feature, but simply a convention to mark internal helper macros (also see: "The little book of Macros", StackOverflow question).


Push down accumulation is well described in this chapter of "The little book of Rust macros". The important part is:

All macros in Rust must result in a complete, supported syntax element (such as an expression, item, etc.). This means that it is impossible to have a macro expand to a partial construct.

But often it is necessary to have partial results, for example when dealing token for token with some input. To solve this, one basically has an "out" parameter which is just a list of tokens that grows with each recursive macro call. This works, because macro input can be arbitrary tokens and don't have to be a valid Rust construct.

This pattern only makes sense for macros that work as "incremental TT munchers", which my solution does. There is also a chapter about this pattern in TLBORM.


The second key point is to check two identifiers for equality. This is done with an interesting trick: the macro defines a new macro which is then immediately used. Let's take a look at the code:

(@replace $needle:ident $replacement:ident $i:ident) => {{
    macro_rules! __inner_helper {
        ($needle $needle) => { $replacement };
        ($needle $i) => { $i };                
    }

    __inner_helper!($needle $i)
}}

Let's go through two different invocations:

  • replace!(@replace foo bar baz): this expands to:

    macro_rules! __inner_helper {
        (foo foo) => { bar };
        (foo baz) => { baz };
    }
    
    __inner_helper!(foo baz)
    

    And the inner_helper! invocation now clearly takes the second pattern, resulting in baz.

  • replace!(@replace foo bar foo) on the other hand expands to:

    macro_rules! __inner_helper {
        (foo foo) => { bar };
        (foo foo) => { foo };
    }
    
    __inner_helper!(foo foo)
    

    This time, the inner_helper! invocation takes the first pattern, resulting in bar.

I learned this trick from a crate that offers basically only exactly that: a macro checking two identifiers for equality. But unfortunately, I cannot find this crate anymore. Let me know if you know the name of that crate!


This implementation has a few limitations, however:

  • As an incremental TT muncher, it recurses for each token in the input. So it's easy to reach the recursion limit (which can be increased, but it's not optimal). It could be possible to write a non-recursive version of this macro, but so far I haven't found a way to do that.

  • macro_rules! macros are a bit strange when it comes to identifiers. The solution presented above might behave strange with self as identifier. See this chapter for more information on that topic.


Solution with proc-macro

Of course this can also be done via a proc-macro. It also involves less strange tricks. My solution looks like this:

extern crate proc_macro;

use proc_macro::{
    Ident, TokenStream, TokenTree,
    token_stream,
};


#[proc_macro]
pub fn replace(input: TokenStream) -> TokenStream {
    let mut it = input.into_iter();

    // Get first parameters
    let needle = get_ident(&mut it);
    let _comma = it.next().unwrap();
    let replacement = get_ident(&mut it);
    let _comma = it.next().unwrap();

    // Return the remaining tokens, but replace identifiers.
    it.map(|tt| {
        match tt {
            // Comparing `Ident`s can only be done via string comparison right
            // now. Note that this ignores syntax contexts which can be a
            // problem in some situation.
            TokenTree::Ident(ref i) if i.to_string() == needle.to_string() => {
                TokenTree::Ident(replacement.clone())
            }

            // All other tokens are just forwarded
            other => other,
        }
    }).collect()
}

/// Extract an identifier from the iterator.
fn get_ident(it: &mut token_stream::IntoIter) -> Ident {
    match it.next() {
        Some(TokenTree::Ident(i)) => i,
        _ => panic!("oh noes!"),
    }
}

Using this proc macro with the main() example from above works exactly the same.

Note: error handling was ignored here to keep the example short. Please see this question on how to do error reporting in proc macros.

Apart from this, that code doesn't need as much explanations, I think. This proc macro version also doesn't suffer from the recursion limit problem as the macro_rules! macro.

  • Nice tricks! Thanks, that's very illuminating. Nice that I can continue building my solution with macro_rules!, I guess implementing this as a function that processes TokenStreams is a lot more work. – hoheinzollern May 2 '19 at 13:26
  • @hoheinzollern I added an implementation for proc macros. I wouldn't say it's "a lot more work"; it's actually easier to understand IMO since it doesn't require as many hacks. But sure, setting up a proc-macro sadly still requires a separate crate and doing proper error handling adds boilerplate code. – Lukas Kalbertodt May 2 '19 at 13:58
  • Note that your macro_rules! solution does not handle parentheses (eg. replace!(foo, bar, (foo))) a special rule would need to be added for that. – Jmb May 2 '19 at 14:57
  • @Jmb Well spotted! I didn't think of that at all. I fixed it in the answer now (I think). – Lukas Kalbertodt May 2 '19 at 16:42
  • @Lukas what changes would I need to make for your code to parse blocks instead of expressions? For example I'd like to make this call: dbg!(replace!(abc, foo, { let x = 100; foo * x + z })); – hoheinzollern May 3 '19 at 9:23

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