26

What would be a valid use case for a signature like this?:

T&& foo();

Or is the rvalue ref only intended for use as argument?

How would one use a function like this?

T&& t = foo(); // is this a thing? And when would t get destructed?
  • 6
    std::move comes to mind. It certainly returns T&&. Edit : std::optional::value also has an T&& overload. Edit 2 : It also has a const T && overload, though I'll admit I don't understand the meaning. – François Andrieux May 2 at 19:32
  • 1
    @FrançoisAndrieux the std::get family of functions, too. – Brian May 2 at 19:34
  • 1
    See this answer. – lubgr May 2 at 19:37
  • Isn't that a forwarding reference? – user2357112 May 3 at 1:52
19

For a free function it doesn't make much sense to return a rvalue reference. If it is a non-static local object then you never want to return a reference or pointer to it because it will be destroyed after the function returns. It can possibly make sense to return a rvalue reference to an object that you passed to the function though. It really depends on the use case for if it makes sense or not.

One thing that can greatly benefit from returning an rvalue reference is a member function of a temporary object. Lets say you have

class foo
{
    std::vector<int> bar;
public:
    foo(int n) : bar(n) {}
    std::vector<int>& get_vec() { return bar; }
};

If you do

auto vec = foo(10).get_vec();

you have to copy because get_vec returns an lvalue. If you instead use

class foo
{
    std::vector<int> bar;
public:
    foo(int n) : bar(n) {}
    std::vector<int>& get_vec() & { return bar; }
    std::vector<int>&& get_vec() && { return std::move(bar); }
};

Then vec would be able to move the vector returned by get_vec and you save yourself an expensive copy operation.

  • @FrançoisAndrieux That's covered by my It can possibly make sense to return a rvalue reference to an object that you passed to the function though. It really depends on the use case for if it makes sense or not. catch all. I know there are cases but I really didn't want to try and list them all. – NathanOliver May 2 at 19:37
  • Is there a reason to prefer returning by rvalue-ref compared to returning by value here? – super May 2 at 19:38
  • @super I take it your talking about the get_vec case? If you return by value you incur 2 move operations. Passing by rvalue reference you only have 1 move. – NathanOliver May 2 at 19:39
  • 1
    @NathanOliver Well, you can call it on any rvalue (e.g. std::move(a).get_vec()). My point is that you're potentially returning a reference to an object that's about to be destroyed. It's the same problem as returning a reference to a local function variable. – Cruz Jean May 2 at 20:03
  • 4
    std::vector<int> get_vec() && { return std::move(bar); } in this case ends up being better 999/1000. Can you come up with a better example? – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont May 2 at 20:08
5
T&& t = foo(); // is this a thing? And when would t get destructed?

An rvalue reference is really similar to a lvalue reference. Think about your example like it was normal references:

T& foo();

T& t = foo(); // when is t destroyed?

The answer is that t is still valid to use as long as the object is refers to lives.

The same answer still applies to you rvalue reference example.


But... does it make sense to return an rvalue reference?

Sometimes, yes. But very rarely.

consider this:

std::vector<int> v = ...;

// type is std::tuple<std::vector<int>&&>
auto parameters = std::forward_as_tuple(std::move(v));

// fwd is a rvalue reference since std::get returns one.
// fwd is valid as long as v is.
decltype(auto) fwd = std::get<0>(std::move(parameters));

// useful for calling function in generic context without copying
consume(std::get<0>(std::move(parameters)));

So yes there are example. Here, another interesting one:

struct wrapper {

    auto operator*() & -> Heavy& {
        return heavy;
    }

    auto operator*() && -> Heavy&& {
        return std::move(heavy);
    }

private:
    Heavy instance;
};

// by value
void use_heavy(Heavy);

// since the wrapper is a temporary, the
// Heavy contained will be a temporary too. 
use_heavy(*make_wrapper());
  • In the last example, if the wrapper instance you use this on is a temporary, operator*() returns a reference to instance, which is likewise a temporary. So after the function returns you have a reference to an object whose lifetime has ended (undefined behavior). – Cruz Jean May 2 at 20:51
  • @CruzJean corrected – Guillaume Racicot May 2 at 20:57
  • Are you sure you don't need decltype(auto) fwd = std::get<0>(std::move(parameters));? – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont May 13 at 15:47
  • @Yakk-AdamNevraumont you are right, thanks – Guillaume Racicot May 13 at 17:07
1

I think a use case would be to explicitly give permission to "empty" some non-local variable. Perhaps something like this:

class Logger
{
public:
    void log(const char* msg){
        logs.append(msg);
    }
    std::vector<std::string>&& dumpLogs(){
        return std::move(logs);
    }
private:
    std::vector<std::string> logs;
};

But I admit I made this up now, I never actually used it and it also can be done like this:

std::vector<std::string> dumpLogs(){
    auto dumped_logs = logs;
    return dumped_logs;
}
  • 1
    That's what the other answers have come up with as well, but in the case where this is called on a temporary object, by the time the function returns you have an (rvalue) reference to an object whose lifetime has ended (undefined behavior). – Cruz Jean May 2 at 20:52
  • @CruzJean Well, my answer was here first and no one downvoted/complained yet so I will keep it here. I am not returning any reference to a temporary anywhere. – Quimby May 2 at 20:58
  • return std::move(logs); where the return value is a reference type and *this is a temporary (due to being an rvalue method) makes this->logs a temporary as well. That's the reference to a temporary I mean. – Cruz Jean May 2 at 22:25
  • @CruzJean Do you mean e.g. auto&& x = Logger{}.dumpLogs(); ? Yes, that is dangling reference, but that happens for all getters no matter what type of reference they return. My use case would be something like Logger l; /*calls to log()*/, auto logs = l.dumpLogs();/*log again.. and repeat.*/ – Quimby May 3 at 10:54

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