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I had a weird problem with java, while working with Sockets I created a case LOGOUT: (283) for the server to handle (client sends different ints to specify a service request to server), but in my switch the LOGOUT case was unreachable for some reason (IntelliJ told me that this statement was unreachable). So I tried System.out.println(ServiceId) and it was always a different number (not a random one) from 283, it was really weird. I solved this problem by changing the number. Obviously the number 283 wasn't in no other variable. Could it be Java that use a final static int with value 283 for something else?

P.S : Could it be that switch has maximum number of statement where this number is less than 283?

    private static void getService(Socket s) throws IOException {
        InputStream inputStream = s.getInputStream();
        int servId = inputStream.read();
        OutputStream outputStream = s.getOutputStream();
        Runnable task;
        System.out.println("***************** " + servId); // this servID should be the number 283 but it's not.
        switch(servId) {
            case REPLY_EMAIL:
            case FORWARD_EMAIL:
            case REPLY_ALL_EMAIL:
            case WRITE_EMAIL:
                outputStream.write(SUCCESS_RESPONSE);
                task = new EmailReceiver(s,lock, servId, serverLog);
                threadPool.execute(task);
                break;

            case LOGOUT:
                outputStream.write(SUCCESS_RESPONSE);
                threadPool.execute(new Runnable() {
                    @Override
                    public void run() {
                        try {
                            String user = Utils.getUser(s);
                            serverLog.writeLog("L'utente " + user + " si è disconnesso.");
                        } catch (IOException e) {
                            e.printStackTrace();
                        }
                    }
                });
                break;

            case READ_ALL_EMAILS:
                outputStream.write(SUCCESS_RESPONSE);
                task = new EmailReader(s, serverLog);
                threadPool.execute(task);
                break;

            case USER_LIST:
                outputStream.write(SUCCESS_RESPONSE);
                task = new UserGetter(s, serverLog);
                threadPool.execute(task);
                break;

            case LOGIN:
                outputStream.write(SUCCESS_RESPONSE);
                task = new UserLogin(s, serverLog);
                threadPool.execute(task);
                break;

            case DELETE_EMAIL:
                outputStream.write(SUCCESS_RESPONSE);
                task = new EmailDelete(s, serverLog);
                threadPool.execute(task);
                break;

            case NOTIFICATION:
                outputStream.write(SUCCESS_RESPONSE);
                task = new Notificator(s, serverLog);
                threadPool.execute(task);
                break;

            default:
                serverLog.writeLog("Errore di Richiesta");
                outputStream.write(FAILURE_RESPONSE);
                break;
        }
    }

package common;

public class ServiceID {

    public static final int WRITE_EMAIL = 84;
    public static final int READ_ALL_EMAILS = 50;
    public static final int FORWARD_EMAIL = 94;
    public static final int REPLY_EMAIL = 95;
    public static final int REPLY_ALL_EMAIL = 96;
    public static final int DELETE_EMAIL = 100;
    public static final int LOGIN = 11;
    public static final int USER_LIST = 111;
    public static final int SUCCESS_RESPONSE = 1;
    public static final int FAILURE_RESPONSE = -1;
    public static final int NOTIFICATION = 118;
    public static final int EMAIL_NOT_FOUND = 404;
    public static final int LOGOUT = 283;
}

these 2 pieces of code are the functions where I get the ServiceID from InputStream. The other class is all the possible serviceID number. Don't write : " you are probably pass serviceID wrongly", because this is not the case, all other ServiceID working properly.

  • 3
    That probably means you already have a case 283 – SLaks May 2 at 22:03
  • 1
    Is A or any other value used in a case label in the switch statement also equal to 283? – rgettman May 2 at 22:03
  • 3
    Please provide a minimal reproducible example – GBlodgett May 2 at 22:11
  • 1
    Don't describe your code, post it as minimal reproducible example (a.k.a. SSCCE) to let us reproduce your problem. Without it we are just playing guessing game, instead of debugging. – Pshemo May 2 at 22:13
  • 1
    What is ServiceID? Looks like a class name, not a variable name, and it's definitely not the servId declared 3 lines above. --- What's the relevance to this question of the code preceding the switch statement? – Andreas May 2 at 22:22
4

If InputStream is java.io.InputStream, the return value is an 8-bit value (or -1), so it will not match 283.

public abstract int read() throws IOException

Reads the next byte of data from the input stream. The value byte is returned as an int in the range 0 to 255. If no byte is available because the end of the stream has been reached, the value -1 is returned.

  • Just to add some clarification: I highly doubt the OP is getting a compilation warning or error. It's probably one of IntelliJ's code inspections that has analyzed the code and, knowing that read will never return a value greater than 255, has warned the OP the case will never occur. But the compiler only knows read returns an int and has no idea about the valid range of results. In other words, this is the IDE issuing a warning, not the compiler. – Slaw May 2 at 23:56
  • oh wait, but what about --> public static final int EMAIL_NOT_FOUND = 404; it's bigger – Ignorant_People_97 May 3 at 0:11
  • yes Slaw is the a IDE warning, not a compiler error. – Ignorant_People_97 May 3 at 0:17
  • I find it hard to believe that IntelliJ detected all this, but it will certainly prevent correct execution of the code. – user207421 May 3 at 0:29
  • @user207421 I tried a similar setup to the OP's code and the warning I get is from an inspection; specifically, from the Java → Probable bugs → Constant conditions & exceptions inspection. – Slaw May 3 at 0:34

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