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I am confused about how much the JVM relies on the resources of the computer it is installed on.

I have read that the JVM acts like a virtual computer, which makes me think that it operates independently of the physical computer, to some degree at least.

At first I thought that all the JVM did was translate the bytecode and tell the physical computer to run it. Now, from what I read, it almost sounds like the JVM is much more involved, almost more involved than the physical computer itself. The textbooks I have read are kind of vague on this topic.

  • I would recommend these slides: ittc.ku.edu/~kulkarni/teaching/EECS768/slides/chapter5_6.pdf – R4444 May 3 '19 at 1:02
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    There is no contradiction. A software can be more involved than the computer it runs on. Still, it requires the resources of the computer. In case of a JVM, the complexity can vary depending on the implementation. It can be a simple mediator between the Java software and the real machine, an interpreter or compiler, or a complex architecture with code optimizers, data prefetchers, implementing itself any feature the underlying system doesn’t have. – Holger May 3 '19 at 6:44
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The JVM is a program which runs on your CPUs.

The Virtual Machine it simulates is only a definition of how the program should act, but the actually execution is in machine code, using real memory like any other program.

I have read that the JVM acts like a virtual computer, which makes me think that it operates independently of the physical computer, to some degree at least.

Notionally it does, but this is an illusion as the computer does all the real work.

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  • So, to clarify, when I write a program that stores variables and prints stuff to the screen, the stored variables use actual computer memory and the stuff printed to the screen is the result of the physical computer being told to do so by the machine language? – Andrew S. May 12 '19 at 22:51

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