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I have a BOM table with:

ParentProdID, Qty, ComponentProdID

and two others that need to be joined to the BOM table for conditions ie:

ParentProdID = ProdTable.ProdID
ProdTable.TraitCode = SuppTable.TraitDesc

I'd like to have an end table with:

Parent code | Last component

where Parent code fills traits ProdID.A and Trait.B or Trait.C Last component in tree that fills Trait.B (Last component may be a parent that has children, but if none of the children have trait B I want to treat them as leaves)

As far as I can tell, SQL Server should be able to do that, or something close, but I'm pretty new to doing recursion with SQL. Most solutions I've seen use recursive CTEs to print the whole BOM in a hierarchical manner in two columns, which is close, but not quite as clean as I'd like.

Is it possible to make the trait stuff a CTE and refer to that in the (presumably a CTE) that finds the leaves for the parent product?

The parents don't have to be true root nodes and can be anything.

eg. for a BOM of:

Guitar(Wood, EndProduct)
-Neck(Wood, Neck)
--Strings(Metal, Neck)
--Hardware(Metal, Neck)
--NeckPiece(Wood, Neck)
-Body(Wood, Body)
--Bottom(Wood, Body)
--Top(Wood, Body)

it'd print:

Parent|Leaf
Guitar|NeckPiece
Neck|NeckPiece

If this kind of thing isn't possible in SQL server, would printing a list of all of a parent's children along with a depth counter and then arranging the result set so the highest depth ratings are at the top get a functionally identical result for a top-down lookup function like MATCH or VLOOKUP in Excel?

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First time I've used CTEs, so probably not an optimal solution. But should suffice to show that it is possible within MSSQL.

Table part:

| id | parent_id | title                    |
| -- | --------- | ------------------------ |
|  1 |      NULL | Guitar(Wood, EndProduct) |
|  2 |         1 | Neck(Wood, Neck)         |
|  3 |         2 | Strings(Metal, Neck)     |
|  4 |         2 | Hardware(Metal, Neck)    |
|  5 |         2 | NeckPiece(Wood, Neck)    |
|  6 |         1 | Body(Wood, Body)         |
|  7 |         6 | Bottom(Wood, Body)       |
|  8 |         6 | Top(Wood, Body)          |

Query:

/*
* the CTE
*/
WITH parts_cte AS
(
    /* anchor:
    *  - part_level: the level in the hierarchy, with root starting at 0 not
    *                really necessary for this query, but still interesting
    *  - root_id:    NULL since this is the root and it has no root above it
    */
    SELECT
        p.id,
        p.parent_id,
        p.title,
        0 AS part_level,
        NULL as root_id
    FROM
        part p
    WHERE
        p.parent_id IS NULL
    /* recursion:
    *  - part_level: increased by one for each recursion step
    *  - root_id:    use the parent's root_id or fall back to parent's id
    */
    UNION ALL
    SELECT
        child.id,
        parent.id,
        child.title,
        parent.part_level + 1,
        ISNULL(parent.root_id, child.parent_id)
    FROM
        part child
        INNER JOIN parts_cte parent ON child.parent_id = parent.id
)

/*
* the actual statement that executes the CTE
*  1. get the parts to use as the parents
*  2. join the CTE as the leafs with matching root_id or matching parent_id
*  3. join the parts again on the leafs to see if any of the leafs have children
*     (which means they are not actually leafs)
*  4. remove lines without a leaf (to exclude the parts selected in 1. that are
*     actually leafs)
*  5. group by the column we want to show (to remove duplicates created by the 3.)
*  6. only keep lines where the leafs don't have any children of their own (see 3.)
*/
SELECT
    parent.id,
    parent.title AS parent,
    leaf.title AS leaf
FROM
    part parent
    LEFT OUTER JOIN parts_cte leaf ON
        parent.id = leaf.root_id
        OR parent.id = leaf.parent_id
    LEFT OUTER JOIN part leaf_child ON leaf.id = leaf_child.parent_id
WHERE
    leaf.id IS NOT NULL
GROUP BY
    parent.id,
    parent.title,
    leaf.title
HAVING
    COUNT(leaf_child.id) = 0
ORDER BY
    parent.id

Query result:

| id | parent                   | leaf                  |
| -- | ------------------------ | --------------------- |
|  1 | Guitar(Wood, EndProduct) | Bottom(Wood, Body)    |
|  1 | Guitar(Wood, EndProduct) | Hardware(Metal, Neck) |
|  1 | Guitar(Wood, EndProduct) | NeckPiece(Wood, Neck) |
|  1 | Guitar(Wood, EndProduct) | Strings(Metal, Neck)  |
|  1 | Guitar(Wood, EndProduct) | Top(Wood, Body)       |
|  2 | Neck(Wood, Neck)         | Hardware(Metal, Neck) |
|  2 | Neck(Wood, Neck)         | NeckPiece(Wood, Neck) |
|  2 | Neck(Wood, Neck)         | Strings(Metal, Neck)  |
|  6 | Body(Wood, Body)         | Bottom(Wood, Body)    |
|  6 | Body(Wood, Body)         | Top(Wood, Body)       |
2
  • Close, but the table construction is a bit different - it's literally just parentID followed by info like ComponentID and how many pieces of the component are needed in parentID. So more like: Table BOM: ``` |ParentID|ComponentID| |Guitar|Neck| |Guitar|Body| |Neck|Strings| |Neck|Hardware| |Neck|NeckPiece| |Body|Bottom| |Body|Top| ``` Title and other properties (eg.wood or endproduct) has to be brought from an external table. It's an awkward setup in that sense, but sadly beyond my power to change.
    – Coffeeling
    May 7 '19 at 14:57
  • Close, but the table construction is a bit different - it's literally just parentID followed by info like ComponentID and how many pieces of the component are needed in parentID. So more like: Table BOM: ~~~ |ParentID|ComponentID| |Guitar|Neck| |Guitar|Body| |Neck|Strings| |Neck|Hardware| |Neck|NeckPiece| |Body|Bottom| |Body|Top| ~~~ Title and other properties (eg.wood or endproduct) has to be brought from an external table. It's a bad setup in that sense, but beyond my power to change. From that, list parentID if Neck or EndProduct, list leaf component if Wood and Neck.
    – Coffeeling
    May 7 '19 at 15:06

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