How do I detect when one of the arrow keys are pressed? I used this to find out:

function checkKey(e) {
    var event = window.event ? window.event : e;
    console.log(event.keyCode)
}

Though it worked for every other key, it didn't for arrow keys (maybe because the browser is supposed to scroll on these keys by default).

16 Answers 16

up vote 587 down vote accepted

arrow keys are only triggered by onkeydown, not onkeypress

keycodes are:

  • left = 37
  • up = 38
  • right = 39
  • down = 40
  • 9
    Some browsers do trigger keypress events for arrow keys, but you're right that keydown always works for arrow keys. – Tim Down Apr 8 '11 at 15:37
  • 4
    If you press %, you also get keyCode 37 – xorcus Oct 17 '13 at 14:22
  • 9
    @xorcus -- No, you get 53 with a keydown event. You get 37 with keypress, which is a different thing – Mark Kahn Oct 19 '13 at 6:00
  • 6
    What about onkeyup? – 1nfiniti Jan 13 '14 at 13:51
  • 5
    Same as keydown – marcelo-ferraz Aug 13 '14 at 2:11

On key up and down call function. There are different codes for each key.

document.onkeydown = checkKey;

function checkKey(e) {

    e = e || window.event;

    if (e.keyCode == '38') {
        // up arrow
    }
    else if (e.keyCode == '40') {
        // down arrow
    }
    else if (e.keyCode == '37') {
       // left arrow
    }
    else if (e.keyCode == '39') {
       // right arrow
    }

}
  • What does the second line do? – eshellborn Aug 14 '13 at 20:39
  • 12
    To clarify, 'e || window.event' means that if 'e' is a defined value, it will be the result of the '||' expression. If 'e' is not defined, 'window.event' will be the result of the '||' expression. So it's basically shorthand for: e = e ? e : window.event; Or: if (typeof(e) === "undefined") { e = window.event; } – Michael Calvin Dec 17 '13 at 20:35
  • 16
    It's to make it work on old versions of IE (pre IE9) where the event was not passed into the handler function. – Mark Rhodes Jan 24 '14 at 9:10
  • 10
    Just to note keyCode is a number and === should ideally be used – alexrogins Apr 21 '15 at 10:00
  • 7
    @ketan the point was that keyCode is a number and should be checked like keyCode === 32, not keyCode == '32' or keyCode === '32'. – Nenotlep Apr 28 '15 at 7:43

Possibly the tersest formulation:

document.onkeydown = function(e) {
    switch (e.keyCode) {
        case 37:
            alert('left');
            break;
        case 38:
            alert('up');
            break;
        case 39:
            alert('right');
            break;
        case 40:
            alert('down');
            break;
    }
};

Demo (thanks to user Angus Grant): http://jsfiddle.net/angusgrant/E3tE6/

This should work cross-browser. Leave a comment if there is a browser where it does not work.

There are other ways to get the key code (e.which, e.charCode, and window.event instead of e), but they should not be necessary. You can try most of them out at http://www.asquare.net/javascript/tests/KeyCode.html. Note that event.keycode does not work with onkeypress in Firefox, but it does work with onkeydown.

event.key === "ArrowRight"...

More recent and much cleaner: use event.key. No more arbitrary number codes! If you are transpiling or know your users are all on modern browsers, use this!

node.addEventListener('keydown', function(event) {
    const key = event.key; // "ArrowRight", "ArrowLeft", "ArrowUp", or "ArrowDown"
});

Verbose Handling:

switch (event.key) {
    case "ArrowLeft":
        // Left pressed
        break;
    case "ArrowRight":
        // Right pressed
        break;
    case "ArrowUp":
        // Up pressed
        break;
    case "ArrowDown":
        // Down pressed
        break;
}

You can easily extend this to check for "w", "a", "s", "d", or any other key

Mozilla Docs

Supported Browsers

P.S. event.code is the same for arrows

  • 3
    Thank you for using key and not keyCode, that was deprecated. – v010dya Jul 6 '17 at 18:57
  • 1
    Note from MDN: Internet Explorer, Edge (16 and earlier), and Firefox (36 and earlier) use "Left", "Right", "Up", and "Down" instead of "ArrowLeft", "ArrowRight", "ArrowUp", and "ArrowDown". – Simon Aug 28 at 8:47

Use keydown, not keypress for non-printable keys such as arrow keys:

function checkKey(e) {
    e = e || window.event;
    alert(e.keyCode);
}

document.onkeydown = checkKey;

The best JavaScript key event reference I've found (beating the pants off quirksmode, for example) is here: http://unixpapa.com/js/key.html

Modern answer since keyCode is now deprecated in favor of key:

document.onkeydown = function (e) {
    switch (e.key) {
        case 'ArrowUp':
            // up arrow
            break;
        case 'ArrowDown':
            // down arrow
            break;
        case 'ArrowLeft':
            // left arrow
            break;
        case 'ArrowRight':
            // right arrow
    }
};
function checkArrowKeys(e){
    var arrs= ['left', 'up', 'right', 'down'], 
    key= window.event? event.keyCode: e.keyCode;
    if(key && key>36 && key<41) alert(arrs[key-37]);
}
document.onkeydown= checkArrowKeys;
  • Doesn't it worth to put arrs outside of the function? No need to recreate it every call – Grief Mar 3 '16 at 16:14

Here's an example implementation:

var targetElement = $0 || document.body;

function getArrowKeyDirection (keyCode) {
  return {
    37: 'left',
    39: 'right',
    38: 'up',
    40: 'down'
  }[keyCode];
}

function isArrowKey (keyCode) {
  return !!getArrowKeyDirection(keyCode);
}

targetElement.addEventListener('keydown', function (event) {
  var direction,
      keyCode = event.keyCode;

  if (isArrowKey(keyCode)) {
    direction = getArrowKeyDirection(keyCode);

    console.log(direction);
  }
});
  • I am getting $0 is not defined var targetElement = typeof $0 !== 'undefined' ? $0 : document.body; or just: var targetElement = document.body; is ok – papo Dec 13 '16 at 20:37

Here's how I did it:

var leftKey = 37, upKey = 38, rightKey = 39, downKey = 40;
var keystate;
document.addEventListener("keydown", function (e) {
    keystate[e.keyCode] = true;
});
document.addEventListener("keyup", function (e) {
    delete keystate[e.keyCode];
});

if (keystate[leftKey]) {
//code to be executed when left arrow key is pushed.
}
if (keystate[upKey]) {
//code to be executed when up arrow key is pushed.
}
if (keystate[rightKey]) {
//code to be executed when right arrow key is pushed.
}
if (keystate[downKey]) {
//code to be executed when down arrow key is pushed.
}

I've been able to trap them with jQuery:

$(document).keypress(function (eventObject) {
    alert(eventObject.keyCode);
});

An example: http://jsfiddle.net/AjKjU/

  • 1
    keypress won't work with arrow keys. You have to use $(document).on('keydown', function() {...}) instead – Juribiyan Jan 15 '16 at 3:51

That is the working code for chrome and firefox

<html>
<head>
<script type="text/javascript" src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.4.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

<script type="text/javascript">

    function leftArrowPressed() {
      alert("leftArrowPressed" );
      window.location = prevUrl  
    }

    function rightArrowPressed() {
      alert("rightArrowPressed" );
      window.location = nextUrl  
    }
    function topArrowPressed() {
      alert("topArrowPressed" );
      window.location = prevUrl  
    }

    function downArrowPressed() {
      alert("downArrowPressed" );
      window.location = nextUrl  
    }

        document.onkeydown = function(evt) {
                        var nextPage = $("#next_page_link")
                        var prevPage = $("#previous_page_link")
                        nextUrl = nextPage.attr("href")
                        prevUrl = prevPage.attr("href")
        evt = evt || window.event;
        switch (evt.keyCode) {
                case 37:
                leftArrowPressed(nextUrl);
                break;

                case 38:
                topArrowPressed(nextUrl);
                break;

                 case 39:
                rightArrowPressed(prevUrl);
                break;

                case 40:
                downArrowPressed(prevUrl);
                break;

        }
    };


</script>
</head>
<body>
<p>
<a id="previous_page_link" href="http://www.latest-tutorial.com">Latest Tutorials</a> 
<a id="next_page_link" href="http://www.zeeshanakhter.com">Zeeshan Akhter</a>
 </p>
</body>
</html>

I was also looking for this answer until I came across this post.

I've found another solution to know the keycode of the different keys, courtesy to my problem. I just wanted to share my solution.

Just use keyup/keydown event to write the value in the console/alert the same using event.keyCode. like-

console.log(event.keyCode) 

// or

alert(event.keyCode)

- rupam

That's shorter.

function IsArrows (e) { return (e.keyCode >= 37 && e.keyCode <= 40); }

  • 2
    short is good: if ([37,38,39,40].indexOf(e.keyCode)!=-1){ console.log('arrow pressed') } – animaacija Jul 12 '15 at 13:46

Re answers that you need keydown not keypress.

Assuming you want to move something continuously while the key is pressed, I find that keydown works for all browsers except Opera. For Opera, keydown only triggers on 1st press. To accommodate Opera use:

document.onkeydown = checkKey;
document.onkeypress = checkKey;
function checkKey(e)
{ etc etc

This library rocks! https://craig.is/killing/mice

Mousetrap.bind('up up down down left right left right b a enter', function() {
    highlight([21, 22, 23]);
});

You need to press the sequence a bit fast to highlight the code in that page though.

  • Upvote for the Konami code alone – Blair Connolly Aug 31 '17 at 21:52

control the Key codes %=37 and &=38... and only arrow keys left=37 up=38

function IsArrows (e) {
   return ( !evt.shiftKey && (e.keyCode >= 37 && e.keyCode <= 40)); 
}

protected by Community Aug 18 at 6:38

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