19

I want to add a jar file through the systemPath from the local file-system relative to my project directory structure, not on a remote repository. I added the dependency declaration but maven doesn't do anything else with it.

In the declaration below, I want the jar file copied to my target web-inf/lib directory and also jarred as part of the war file. At present, that doesn't happen. How would I get the jar file copied to my war file?

This is the output from debug maven mode:

DEBUG] cglib:cglib-nodep:jar:2.2:test (setting scope to: compile)^M
DEBUG] Retrieving parent-POM: org.objenesis:objenesis-parent:pom:1.2 for project: null:objenesis:ja
DEBUG]   org.objenesis:objenesis:jar:1.2:test (selected for test)^M
DEBUG]   org.javap.web:testRunWrapper:jar:1.0.0:system (selected for system)^M
DEBUG] Plugin dependencies for:
...


<dependency>
    <groupId>org.javap.web</groupId>
    <artifactId>testRunWrapper</artifactId>
    <version>1.0</version>
    <scope>system</scope>
    <systemPath>${basedir}/lib/testRunWrapper.jar</systemPath>
</dependency>
<plugin>
    <artifactId>maven-war-plugin</artifactId>
    <configuration>                 
        <webResources>
            <resource>
                <directory>WebContent</directory>
            </resource>
        </webResources>
    </configuration>
</plugin>
29

OK, I did this: Note the directory structure at the bottom. With the approach below, the jar file from the relative project path is treated as a first class citizen like the other jars. The listing below corrects my original problem. With the pom.xml listing below, the jar file is copied to my target directory.

<repositories>
    <repository>
        <id>JBoss</id>
        <name>JBoss Repository</name>
        <layout>default</layout>
        <url>http://repository.jboss.org/maven2</url>
    </repository>

    <repository>
       <id>my-local-repo</id>
       <url>file://${basedir}/lib/repo</url>
    </repository>
</repositories>

<dependency>
    <groupId>testRunWrapper</groupId>
    <artifactId>testRunWrapper</artifactId>
    <version>1.0.0</version>            
</dependency>

$ find repo
repo
repo/testRunWrapper
repo/testRunWrapper/testRunWrapper
repo/testRunWrapper/testRunWrapper/1.0.0
repo/testRunWrapper/testRunWrapper/1.0.0/testRunWrapper-1.0.0.jar
6
  • 1
    And what is the question? Doesn't it work? Note that you normally install a dependency using mvn install:install-file and your default local repo is in home/.m2/repository.
    – Thomas
    Apr 8 '11 at 15:30
  • This is the way to go to bundle ojdbc6 driver within a project. Remember to change local system path separators to backslash when applied to Windows env. Jul 25 '12 at 14:58
  • 1
    This indeed works. The important thing is to note how the dependency entry's groupId, artifactId, and version tags relate to the filepath of the jar. After setting it up correctly, I immediately saw the jar listed under 'Maven Dependencies' in the eclipse 'Project Explorer'
    – tyshock
    Jul 24 '15 at 13:55
  • Unfortunately, this does not work if you are using the recommended mirror setup for a local nexus installation. I gave up and added the jar to nexus. This might yet backfire.
    – demaniak
    Apr 21 '16 at 13:02
  • @demaniak : if mirrors are used, you have to add an exception in the mirrors part like this : <mirrorOf>*, !your-local-repo</mirrorOf>
    – Y.M.
    Jun 22 '16 at 15:19
18

Using the maven dependency plugin does the job:

<build>
    <plugins>
        <plugin>
            <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
            <artifactId>maven-dependency-plugin</artifactId>
            <version>2.8</version>
            <executions>
                <execution>
                    <id>copy-dependencies</id>
                    <phase>compile</phase>
                    <goals>
                        <goal>copy-dependencies</goal>
                    </goals>
                    <configuration>
                        <outputDirectory>${project.build.directory}/${project.build.finalName}/WEB-INF/lib</outputDirectory>
                        <includeScope>system</includeScope>
                    </configuration>
                </execution>
            </executions>
        </plugin>
    </plugins>
</build>
2
  • FYI: when I did this, the log messages indicated that the jar was copied into .../WEB-INF/lib/ after the .war was made from the loose files. This only puts the jar into the war if you run it twice without doing a clean.
    – Roboprog
    Jun 18 '15 at 0:07
  • 1
    I changed one word in your setup: "package" -> "compile" for the execution phase. Now it works the first time / after a "clean". THANKS!!!
    – Roboprog
    Jun 18 '15 at 0:13
7

Don't use system. To do what you want, just declare as a regular (compile) dependency and use mvn install:install-file into your local repository. Everything else will work as you want (lib will be copied, etc.) That will mean that the build will only work on your machine, however.

To properly fix this for your (internal) team, you will want to set up a repository (e.g. Artifactory, Nexus, or Archiva). This is almost a must for team use of Maven.

If this is for public (e.g. open source) use you can either mimic a repository via an http server or put up a real repository.

1
  • As an aside, CloudBees.com offers a nice Maven repository feature for even their cheapest account options. Mar 29 '13 at 20:30
2

try something like this (using Ant plugin to manually put the jar to output directory):

<plugin>
       <artifactId>maven-antrun-plugin</artifactId>
       <executions>
         <execution>
           <phase>test</phase>
           <goals>
             <goal>run</goal>
           </goals>
           <configuration>
             <tasks>
               <copy file="${project.basedir}/pathToJAR.jar"
                     todir="${project.build.directory}/outputFileName/WEB-INF/lib"/>
             </tasks>
           </configuration>
         </execution>
       </executions>
     </plugin>
1

AFAIK, system scoped dependencies are somewhat like those with provided scope and thus are not included in the target artifact. Why don't you install the dependency into your local repository instead?

From the doc:

system
This scope is similar to provided except that you have to provide the JAR which contains it explicitly. The artifact is always available and is not looked up in a repository.

3
  • I guess I could but didn't know if that was the way to go. Apr 8 '11 at 15:23
  • 2
    "Just" install the jar in your local repository. ALL of you on the team, every time there is a new hire. That's the typical maven solution for legacy and 3rd party jars, but it kind of sucks. It's much easier to put these hard-to-get jars in source control, and then have a build process that "just works", even if having jars in the project source is blasphemy in maven-land. I, at least, would prefer that a nexus server act as a cache for maven central and local build artifacts, not as a custom archive of rarities :-(
    – Roboprog
    Jun 17 '15 at 23:53
  • 1
    Or have a separate repo within Nexus/Artifactory for such items, called "archive-of-rarities" or similar, so there's no confusion. Then you won't have to explain to your Maven folks why you've blasphemed, nine times a day...
    – SusanW
    Apr 26 '17 at 11:48
1

In case this answer didn't work for you as it didn't for me and you know that system is a bad scope, you can try this solution where you are Installing the jar by using install-plugin (scroll down a bit), which installs the JAR into your actual local Maven-repository. Basically you only need to add this plugin to your pom.xml:

<plugin>
  <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
  <artifactId>maven-install-plugin</artifactId>
  <version>2.4</version>
  <executions>
    <execution>
      <phase>initialize</phase>
      <goals>
        <goal>install-file</goal>
      </goals>
      <configuration>
        <groupId>myGroupId</groupId>
        <artifactId>myArtifactId</artifactId>
        <version>myVersion</version>
        <packaging>jar</packaging>
        <file>${basedir}/lib/xxx.jar</file>
      </configuration>
    </execution>
  </executions>
</plugin>

Fill in the appropriate values for groupId, artifactId and version and put your original jar file into the <project-home>/lib-directory and fix file above. You can add more execution-sections, but then don't forget to add ids there, like:

      <execution>
        <id>common-lib</id>

Everybody who updates from the code-repo needs to call mvn initialize once.

And all Eclipse-enthusiasts may add this to pom.xml, too, to get rid of errors in Eclipse:

<pluginManagement>
  <plugins>
    <!-- This plugin's configuration is used to store Eclipse m2e settings 
      only. It has no influence on the Maven build itself. -->
    <plugin>
      <groupId>org.eclipse.m2e</groupId>
      <artifactId>lifecycle-mapping</artifactId>
      <version>1.0.0</version>
      <configuration>
        <lifecycleMappingMetadata>
          <pluginExecutions>
            <pluginExecution>
              <pluginExecutionFilter>
                <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
                <artifactId>maven-install-plugin</artifactId>
                <versionRange>[2.4,)</versionRange>
                <goals>
                  <goal>install-file</goal>
                </goals>
              </pluginExecutionFilter>
              <action>
                <execute></execute>
              </action>
            </pluginExecution>
          </pluginExecutions>
        </lifecycleMappingMetadata>
      </configuration>
    </plugin>
  </plugins>
</pluginManagement>
0

The problem with using a reference to the file system is that dependent projects will not be able to globally access this jar file. i.e. the dependent project's ${basedir} is different and thus the .jar file won't be found.

Global repositories on the other hand are universally accessible.

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