0

This is my render

render() {
    let products = this.state.products  
    return (
      <ul>
        {products.map((product, index) => Product({ key: index, product: product }))}          
      </ul>
    );
  }

I am using a unique key, and still get the warning

Warning: Each child in an array or iterator should have a unique "key" prop.

1

I found this for you.

How to create unique keys for React elements?

It seems like you need to have a return for the key. Or, as it states, npm packages already exist to declare unique keys.

1

That's not how you return a Component or pass it the key prop (or any other props...)

<ul>
    {products.map((product, index) => (
        <Product key={index} product={product} />
    ))}
</ul>

https://reactjs.org/docs/components-and-props.html#composing-components

8
  • 1
    Does it matter if Product is a functional component? Those should accept props in as a parameter?
    – HPierce
    May 4 '19 at 1:59
  • 1
    The React docs (See Welcome()) say otherwise. And I just make a plunk that showed that OP's syntax is fine :(
    – HPierce
    May 4 '19 at 2:12
  • @HPierce We are talking about 2 different things.... Product can be a functional component and receive the props as the docs suggest... But passing the props to that functional component is as I pointed out... Look at the docs again...
    – SakoBu
    May 4 '19 at 3:21
  • @SakoBu I read you could do it both ways stackoverflow.com/questions/46965309/… May 4 '19 at 17:55
  • It's not new and I encourage you to do some research about the limitations of it... medium.com/missive-app/… (go down into the comments....)
    – SakoBu
    May 4 '19 at 18:04
1

You are not passing child elements to the ul

render() {
    let products = this.state.products  
    return (
      <ul>
        {products.map((product, index) => 
          <li key={index}>
            {product}
          </li>}          
      </ul>
    );
  }
2
  • So there is no way to not get the warning when calling the component as a function then? I will always get the warning? That shouldn't be so, because then I am forced to not to, which supposedly is ok May 4 '19 at 17:57
  • The <li> part is in the Product component, I am not supposed to change it May 4 '19 at 18:03
1

I'm seeing this:

function Product(props) {
  return (
     <p key={props.key}>{props.product}</p> 
  )
}

function Main(props) {
  let products = [ "foo", "bar", "baz"];
  return (
    <ul>
      {products.map((product, index) => Product({key: index, product: product }))}        
    </ul>
  );
}

ReactDOM.render(
  <Main></Main>,
  document.getElementById('example')
);

and this:

function Product(props) {
  return (
     <p>{props.product}</p> 
  )
}

function Main(props) {
  let products = [ "foo", "bar", "baz"];
  return (
    <ul>
      {products.map((product, index) => (
        <li key={index}>
          {Product({product: product })}
        </li>
      ))}    
    </ul>
  );
}

ReactDOM.render(
  <Main></Main>,
  document.getElementById('example')
);

Do what you're trying to accomplish.

If I had to guess (I don't have high confidence in this explanation), I would suspect that React requires a key prop on child components to so that it can quickly determine which elements need to be re-rendered when state changes. Therefore, passing a key prop won't actually achieve anything unless it's actually rendered as UI. The two examples above are rendering keys to the virtual DOM in the <p> and <li> respectively.

1
  • I will try this, thank you, i will have to repeat the key though, because I need it as a prop in the Product component Edit: I can't do this, because the <li> is already on Product, and it is a test, that part I cannot touch. May 4 '19 at 17:58

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.