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Is it possible to set model.loss in a callback without re-compiling model.compile(...) after (since then the optimizer states are reset), and just recompiling model.loss, like for example:

class NewCallback(Callback):

        def __init__(self):
            super(NewCallback,self).__init__()

        def on_epoch_end(self, epoch, logs={}):
            self.model.loss=[loss_wrapper(t_change, current_epoch=epoch)]
            self.model.compile_only_loss() # is there a version or hack of 
                                           # model.compile(...) like this?

To expand more with previous examples on stackoverflow:

To achieve a loss function which depends on the epoch number, like (as in this stackoverflow question):

def loss_wrapper(t_change, current_epoch):
    def custom_loss(y_true, y_pred):
        c_epoch = K.get_value(current_epoch)
        if c_epoch < t_change:
            # compute loss_1
        else:
            # compute loss_2
    return custom_loss

where "current_epoch" is a Keras variable updated with a callback:

current_epoch = K.variable(0.)
model.compile(optimizer=opt, loss=loss_wrapper(5, current_epoch), 
metrics=...)

class NewCallback(Callback):
    def __init__(self, current_epoch):
        self.current_epoch = current_epoch

    def on_epoch_end(self, epoch, logs={}):
        K.set_value(self.current_epoch, epoch)

One can essentially turn python code into compositions of backend functions for the loss to work as follows:

def loss_wrapper(t_change, current_epoch):
    def custom_loss(y_true, y_pred):
        # compute loss_1 and loss_2
        bool_case_1=K.less(current_epoch,t_change)
        num_case_1=K.cast(bool_case_1,"float32")
        loss = (num_case_1)*loss_1 + (1-num_case_1)*loss_2
        return loss
    return custom_loss
it works.

I am not satisfied with these hacks, and wonder, is it possible to set model.loss in a callback without re-compiling model.compile(...) after (since then the optimizer states are reset), and just recompiling model.loss?

4
  • 2
    Did you solve this? Do you need to keep the whole optimizer state or just weights? If just weights, perhaps save them, recompile, then load them. There's Model.load_weights(..., by_name=True) to load into a different model to what they were saved from. There's also saving/loading whole state like stackoverflow.com/questions/49503748/… but I'm not sure if it allows you to change the architecture at all. Oct 9 '19 at 23:18
  • Did you find any solutions to this ? I have exactly the same problem.
    – Basilique
    May 5 at 22:35
  • I think using dynamic computational graph or eager execution mode with tf 2.0 will solve this issue eager execution Jun 25 at 4:01
  • I don't find it too hacky to have a single loss function cased out by epoch, per your last approach. You can also use model.add_loss() to do a similar thing without using a wrapper.
    – Mastiff
    Jul 12 at 15:58

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