What's the easiest way to determine an elements position relative to the document/body/browser window?

Right now I'm using .offsetLeft/offsetTop, but this method only gives you the position relative to the parent element, so you need to determine how many parents to the body element, to know the position relaltive to the body/browser window/document position.

This method is also to cumbersome.

10 Answers 10

up vote 53 down vote accepted

You can traverse the offsetParent up to the top level of the DOM.

function getOffsetLeft( elem )
{
    var offsetLeft = 0;
    do {
      if ( !isNaN( elem.offsetLeft ) )
      {
          offsetLeft += elem.offsetLeft;
      }
    } while( elem = elem.offsetParent );
    return offsetLeft;
}
  • 22
    No it does not, when any parent (especially html element!!!) has margins, paddings or borders. – Flash Thunder Nov 20 '14 at 15:10
  • regarding the margin stuff... it might help to set the box-sizing to border-box... or something along those lines... nothing that can't be fixed... – Giorgio Martini Oct 20 '17 at 8:55
  • First,you need to decide whether to take account of border and margin according to box-sizing. Second, the collapsed margin should be considered. And last, there will be more complicated situation in the future which would make this answer worse. – xianshenglu Jun 6 at 5:23

You can get top and left without traversing DOM like this:

function getCoords(elem) { // crossbrowser version
    var box = elem.getBoundingClientRect();

    var body = document.body;
    var docEl = document.documentElement;

    var scrollTop = window.pageYOffset || docEl.scrollTop || body.scrollTop;
    var scrollLeft = window.pageXOffset || docEl.scrollLeft || body.scrollLeft;

    var clientTop = docEl.clientTop || body.clientTop || 0;
    var clientLeft = docEl.clientLeft || body.clientLeft || 0;

    var top  = box.top +  scrollTop - clientTop;
    var left = box.left + scrollLeft - clientLeft;

    return { top: Math.round(top), left: Math.round(left) };
}
  • 4
    This answer doesn't take into account the parents' offsets. It's only relative to the viewport – Nickey Sep 16 '16 at 12:09
  • 1
    @Nickey that's not true—the viewport position, plus the scroll offset checks, yield the coordinates relative to the whole document. – natchiketa Dec 21 '16 at 13:00
  • 1
    Can be buggy on mobile devices stackoverflow.com/a/32623832/962634 Need research – basil Jan 28 '17 at 6:30
  • Why you subtract clientTop/clientLeft? – Teemoh Jun 13 '17 at 4:22
  • @Teemoh clientTop / clientLeft corresponds to border values on the <html> element. – Raphael Rafatpanah Mar 12 at 19:15

You can use element.getBoundingClientRect() to retrieve element position relative to the viewport.

Then use document.documentElement.scrollTop to calculate the viewport offset.

The sum of the two will give the element position relative to the document:

element.getBoundingClientRect().top + document.documentElement.scrollTop
  • 8
    Relative to the viewport is not the same as relative to the document. If the page is scrolled down a bit then the the top relative to the viewport will be a smaller number than the top relative to the document. – MrVimes Jun 21 '14 at 12:20
  • 9
    he starts relative to the viewport and adds scrollY to get it relative to the document. – Joaquin Cuenca Abela Mar 20 '17 at 17:40
  • 2
    @JoaquinCuencaAbela - who is he and what scrollY are you talking about.. – vsync Jul 1 at 11:29

document-offset (3rd-party script) is interesting and it seems to leverage approaches from the other answers here.

Example:

var offset = require('document-offset')
var target = document.getElementById('target')
console.log(offset(target))
// => {top: 69, left: 108} 

I suggest using

element.getBoundingClientRect()

as proposed here instead of manual offset calculation through offsetLeft, offsetTop and offsetParent. as proposed here Under some circumstances* the manual traversal produces invalid results. See this Plunker: http://plnkr.co/pC8Kgj

*When element is inside of a scrollable parent with static (=default) positioning.

  • You can make the offset calculation work also by incorporating scrollLeft and scrollTop into it. – Ben J Aug 18 '15 at 18:36
  • But I found offsetLeft and offsetTop don't take into account CSS3 transforms, which getBoundingClientRect() does. So that's a case the results may be invalid. If you need it, you can get an element's offset relative to parent (like offsetLeft) using (element.getBoundingClientRect().left - parent.getBoundingClientRect().left). – Ben J Aug 18 '15 at 20:19
  • should def get higher up; these values are far more useful, and all in one call too! – mix3d Oct 1 at 20:25

For those that want to get the x and y coordinates of various positions of an element, relative to the document.

const getCoords = (element, position) => {
  const { top, left, width, height } = element.getBoundingClientRect();
  let point;
  switch (position) {
    case "top left":
      point = {
        x: left + window.pageXOffset,
        y: top + window.pageYOffset
      };
      break;
    case "top center":
      point = {
        x: left + width / 2 + window.pageXOffset,
        y: top + window.pageYOffset
      };
      break;
    case "top right":
      point = {
        x: left + width + window.pageXOffset,
        y: top + window.pageYOffset
      };
      break;
    case "center left":
      point = {
        x: left + window.pageXOffset,
        y: top + height / 2 + window.pageYOffset
      };
      break;
    case "center":
      point = {
        x: left + width / 2 + window.pageXOffset,
        y: top + height / 2 + window.pageYOffset
      };
      break;
    case "center right":
      point = {
        x: left + width + window.pageXOffset,
        y: top + height / 2 + window.pageYOffset
      };
      break;
    case "bottom left":
      point = {
        x: left + window.pageXOffset,
        y: top + height + window.pageYOffset
      };
      break;
    case "bottom center":
      point = {
        x: left + width / 2 + window.pageXOffset,
        y: top + height + window.pageYOffset
      };
      break;
    case "bottom right":
      point = {
        x: left + width + window.pageXOffset,
        y: top + height + window.pageYOffset
      };
      break;
  }
  return point;
};

Usage

  • getCoords(document.querySelector('selector'), 'center')

  • getCoords(document.querySelector('selector'), 'bottom right')

  • getCoords(document.querySelector('selector'), 'top center')

http://www.quirksmode.org/js/findpos.html Explains the best way to do it, all in all, you are on the right track you have to find the offsets and traverse up the tree of parents.

  • While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. - From Review – Philipp Maurer Mar 21 at 12:34

If you don't mind using jQuery, then you can use offset() function. Refer to documentation if you want to read up more about this function.

I've found the following method to be the most reliable when dealing with edge cases that trip up offsetTop/offsetLeft.

function getPosition(element) {
    var clientRect = element.getBoundingClientRect();
    return {left: clientRect.left + document.body.scrollLeft,
            top: clientRect.top + document.body.scrollTop};
}

Tested in IE 11, Chrome 62, Firefox 56, Edge 38:

var box = domElement.getBoundingClientRect();
var offsetTop = Math.floor(box.top && box.top || box.y && box.y || 0);

Use left/x for offsetLeft.

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