99

I have retrieved datas stored using useState in an array of object, the datas was then outputted into form fields. And now I want to be able to update the fields (state) as I type.

I have seen examples on people updating the state for property in array, but never for state in an array of object, so I don't know how to do it. I've got the index of the object passed to the callback function but I didn't know how to update the state using it.

// sample data structure
const datas = [
  {
    id: 1,
    name: 'john',
    gender: 'm'
  }
  {
    id: 2,
    name: 'mary',
    gender: 'f'
  }
]

const [datas, setDatas] = useState([]);

const updateFieldChanged = index => e => {
  console.log('index: ' + index);
  console.log('property name: '+ e.target.name);

  setData() // ??
}

return (
  <React.Fragment>
    {datas.map((data, index) => {
      <li key={data.name}>
        <input type="text" name="name" value={data.name} onChange={updateFieldChanged(index)} />
      </li>
    })}
  </React.Fragment>
)

9 Answers 9

196

Here is how you do it:

// sample data structure
/* const data = [
  {
    id:   1,
    name: 'john',
    gender: 'm'
  }
  {
    id:   2,
    name: 'mary',
    gender: 'f'
  }
] */ // make sure to set the default value in the useState call (I already fixed it)

const [data, setData] = useState([
  {
    id:   1,
    name: 'john',
    gender: 'm'
  }
  {
    id:   2,
    name: 'mary',
    gender: 'f'
  }
]);

const updateFieldChanged = index => e => {
  console.log('index: ' + index);
  console.log('property name: '+ e.target.name);
  let newArr = [...data]; // copying the old datas array
  newArr[index] = e.target.value; // replace e.target.value with whatever you want to change it to

  setData(newArr);
}

return (
  <React.Fragment>
    {data.map((datum, index) => {
      <li key={datum.name}>
        <input type="text" name="name" value={datum.name} onChange={updateFieldChanged(index)}  />
      </li>
    })}
  </React.Fragment>
)
7
  • 5
    Thanks it kind of works. I can target to any specific property name in the object like this let propertyName = e.target.name; newArr[index][propertyName] = e.target.value;. But after typing one letter, it didn't stay in focus on the text field, I would have to click on the field again to enter another letter.
    – reddy
    May 5, 2019 at 1:54
  • That is very strange. I made a fiddle on jsfiddle here and it works fine for me: jsfiddle.net/5w9n7cy6
    – Steffan
    May 5, 2019 at 2:38
  • 2
    Okay I figured it out, it was the key in the <li> tag that caused it because it shared the same value as the input field, so when that value changed, the whole <li> refreshed as well. Setting key={index} fixed it.
    – reddy
    May 5, 2019 at 3:25
  • 10
    This mutates the current state. Spread operator only does shallow copy.
    – vinayr
    Nov 14, 2020 at 14:38
  • 1
    @vinayr In this case, a deep copy is not needed.
    – Steffan
    Jan 14, 2021 at 4:16
89

You can do this without mutation by mapping your old array into a new one, swapping what you want to change for an updated item along the way.

setDatas(
    datas.map(item => 
        item.id === index 
        ? {...item, someProp : "changed"} 
        : item 
))
7
  • Myindex is referring to the index of the object in the array, not the property id of the object
    – reddy
    May 5, 2019 at 2:00
  • I like where this is going but it could really use some explanation.
    – serraosays
    Oct 10, 2019 at 19:41
  • 1
    For me this didn't quite work. I had to use: setUsers(users.map(usr => usr.subjectId === updatedUser.subjectId ? { ...updatedUser } : usr)); In my case the subjectId is what is the unique key in my list. Essentially I'm mapping my list and returning the original object in the list, unless the id matches the one i want to update. In that case I return a new object with all the properties of my updated one. Nov 22, 2019 at 21:11
  • This kinda works... However, what if one wants to change multiple properties, not just one? Sep 17, 2021 at 15:26
  • @GuilhermeCrozariol you mean {...item, someProp : "changed", someOtherProp: 42}?
    – spender
    Sep 17, 2021 at 16:10
8
setDatas(datas=>({
   ...datas,
   [index]: e.target.value
}))

with index being the target position and e.target.value the new value

2
  • Maaaan, i wish i know this waaay long time ago. Aug 15, 2021 at 11:39
  • 2
    This doesn't really work (in all cases) because the resulting object is not a real Array, Array.isArray wil return false and you won't be able to use Array methods on your data.
    – Alexis
    Nov 4, 2021 at 15:07
6

You don't even need to be using the index ( except for the key if you want ) nor copying the old datas array,and can even do it inline or just pass data as an argument if you prefer updateFieldChanged to not be inline. It's done very quickly that way :

  const initial_data = [
    {
      id: 1,
      name: "john",
      gender: "m",
    },
    {
      id: 2,
      name: "mary",
      gender: "f",
    },
  ];

  const [datas, setDatas] = useState(initial_data);

  return (
    <div>
      {datas.map((data, index) => (
        <li key={index}>
          <input
            type="text"
            value={data.name}
            onChange={(e) => {
              data.name = e.target.value;
              setDatas([...datas]);
            }}
          />
        </li>
      ))}
    </div>
  );
};
1
  • this one just worked for me beautifully. thanks.
    – LeftyT
    Dec 10, 2021 at 23:22
2

This is what I do:

const [datas, setDatas] = useState([
  {
    id: 1,
    name: "john",
    gender: "m",
  },
  {
    id: 2,
    name: "mary",
    gender: "f",
  },
]);

const updateFieldChanged = (name, index) => (event) => {
  let newArr = datas.map((item, i) => {
    if (index == i) {
      return { ...item, [name]: event.target.value };
    } else {
      return item;
    }
  });
  setDatas(newArr);
};

return (
  <React.Fragment>
    {datas.map((data, index) => {
      <li key={data.name}>
        <input
          type="text"
          name="name"
          value={data.name}
          onChange={updateFieldChanged("name", index)}
        />
      </li>;
      <li key={data.gender}>
        <input
          type="text"
          name="gender"
          value={data.gender}
          onChange={updateFieldChanged("gender", index)}
        />
      </li>;
    })}
  </React.Fragment>
);
2

Spread the array before that. As you cannot update the hook directly without using the method returned by useState

const newState = [...originalState]
newState[index] = newValue
setOriginalState(newState)

This will modify the value of the state and update the useState hook if its an array of string.

1
const updateFieldChanged = index => e => {
   
   name=e.target.name //key
  
   let newArr = [...data]; // copying the old datas array
   newArr[index][name] = e.target.value; //key and value
   setData(newArr);
}

return (
  <React.Fragment>
    {data.map((datum, index) => {
      <li key={datum.name}>
        <input type="text" name="name" value={datum.name} onChange={updateFieldChanged(index)}  />
      </li>
    })}
  </React.Fragment>
)
-1

Base on @Steffan, thus use as your way:

const [arr,arrSet] = useState(array_value);
...
let newArr = [...arr];
  arr.map((data,index) => {
    newArr[index].somename= new_value;
  });
arrSet(newArr);

Use useEffect to check new arr value.

-1

A little late to the party, but it is an option to spread the contents of the array in a new object, then replacing the desired object in the selected index and finally producing an array from that result, it is a short answer, probably not the best for large arrays.

// data = [{name: 'tom', age: 15, etc...}, {name: 'jerry', age: 10, etc...}]
// index = 1
setData(Object.values({...data, [index]: {...data[index], name: 'the mouse' }}))
// data = [{name: 'tom', age: 15, etc...}, {name: 'the mouse', age: 10, etc...}]

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