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I want to find out all the name which contains minimum 2 consecutive a and not more then 3 consecutive a.

I written the quires but It not fulfill the requirement.

Please look the below quires

SELECT FIRST_NAME,LAST_NAME
FROM EMPLOYEES
WHERE REGEXP_LIKE(FIRST_NAME,'a{2,3}')

Output: enter image description here

But I need only "Srikrushnaaa".

Thanks.

  • next time dont use images for test data, use Text Tables Generator to make tables. – Raymond Nijland May 5 '19 at 14:20
  • @Pragyan . . . Would the string 'Xaaxaaaaay' match or not match? – Gordon Linoff May 5 '19 at 19:22
  • Please come back and explain the rules to make the question clearer and finalize it. – Wiktor Stribiżew May 7 '19 at 7:15
3

You may use

WHERE REGEXP_LIKE(FIRST_NAME,'([^a]|^)a{2,3}([^a]|$)')

Details

  • ([^a]|^) - any char but a or start of string
  • a{2,3} - 2 or 3 as
  • ([^a]|$) - any char but a or end of string

See the regex demo and the regex graph:

enter image description here

  • Seams to be a good regex if Oracle database regex's engine is also confirm these processing rules.. – Raymond Nijland May 5 '19 at 14:23
  • @RaymondNijland This regex is compliant with Oracle regex engine. I did not use non-capturing groups and lookarounds here. – Wiktor Stribiżew May 5 '19 at 14:24
  • Well regex does not really have a defined ANSI/ISO standard or a RFC this the reason behide mine comment.. i saw sometimes regex being tested on that same website and when used in the code and it didn't work like expected. – Raymond Nijland May 5 '19 at 14:26
  • " I did not use non-capturing groups and lookarounds here." That's true it makes the regex compliant much better. – Raymond Nijland May 5 '19 at 14:27
  • 2
    Except this matches 'Xaaxaaaaa' – Gordon Linoff May 5 '19 at 14:28
3

I would simply do:

WHERE FIRST_NAME LIKE '%aa%' AND
      FIRST_NAME NOT LIKE '%aaaa%'

Regular expressions don't seem to be needed for this.

  • "Regular expressions don't seem to be needed for this." +1 your right but "minimum 2 consecutive a and not more then 3 consecutive a." should translate into -> WHERE ( FIRST_NAME LIKE '%aa%' OR FIRST_NAME LIKE '%aaa%' ) AND FIRST_NAME NOT LIKE '%aaaa%' i believe? – Raymond Nijland May 5 '19 at 14:32
  • Thanks for your answer, but I am new to regular expression, so i want to achieve this using regular expression. – Pragyan May 5 '19 at 17:14
  • 1
    @RaymondNijland . . . Your expression is overly complicated. If there are three together, then there are two together, so it matches my logic. – Gordon Linoff May 5 '19 at 18:29
  • "Your expression is overly complicated. If there are three together, then there are two together, so it matches my logic" true offcource that is what you get when you are thinking (to) complicated most of the time then you are missing simplification sometimes.. if i could i would give a extra upvote for the simplification.. – Raymond Nijland May 5 '19 at 18:44
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AND a second regexp_like that checks for more than three 'a's.

SELECT FIRST_NAME,
       LAST_NAME
       FROM EMPLOYEES
       WHERE REGEXP_LIKE(FIRST_NAME,'a{2,3}')
             AND NOT REGEXP_LIKE(FIRST_NAME,'a{4,}');
  • Yes, we will get the answer, but I need only one regular expression not AND operator – Pragyan May 5 '19 at 17:21

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