3

I've read at many places that object creation using the 'new' keyword should be avoided in general. Is there any case where creating an object directly in the client code is a better idea than using a factory class?

3

The point of factories is to separate object creation from object use (business logic). This is generally considered a good practice as it helps fulfill principles like Seperation of Concerns and Single Responsibility.

On the other hand factories produce overhead. You have to write (or read) more code if you use them.

I am sure there are cases where factories are not useful. One case that comes to my mind are action listener classes used in UI programming.

As always, you have to decide in each single case. Just ask yourself the question: Will it make my code easier to read and modify?

You should also distinguish between static factory methods which only produce little overhead and abstract factories which are much more complicated.

8
  • 1
    This is the best answer. The main motivation for using factories is to separate the responsibilities of instantiation from the problem domain responsibilities. Thus, when objects have to collaborate, it can be asserted that they have all been created and linked correctly, thereby eliminating the need for null-checks and reducing the complexity to the object interactions. It also means that object creation can be unit-tested based upon a separate set of requirements from the business requirements.
    – RWRkeSBZ
    May 5 '19 at 22:19
  • The pattern factory as the new operator allow to create objects. I don't understand why the factory would separate more the creation than the new operator. Can you explain ? @RWRkeSBZ your arguments show the advantages of a container (such as IOC offers) and not these provided by a factory (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Factory_(object-oriented_programming)) . A container is not a simple factory, that is a really different matter.
    – davidxxx
    May 6 '19 at 21:15
  • Personally, I do not care that much about the mechanism of instantiation, whether it is done with a factory, builder, DI, or new. They all yield the same result in the end. But it is important to isolate object construction from object use, mainly so that it can be tested outside the context of business logic execution. The Factory pattern (one of the options proposed by the asker) encourages that whereas it is easy to end up with new scattered all over the place. With regards to DI versus Factory, one uses the other most of the time, so they are a simple implementation detail to me.
    – RWRkeSBZ
    May 6 '19 at 21:41
  • @davidxxx: When the factory method simply calls the new operator and does nothing else, it makes no difference. But a factory method can do much more, especially when working with interfaces or inheritance. May 7 '19 at 10:46
  • @RWRkeSBZ I disagree about " But it is important to isolate object construction from object use, mainly so that it can be tested outside the context of business logic execution" To achieve testability you want to make dependencies of the class visible and switchable
    – davidxxx
    May 7 '19 at 11:44
0

The Factory method lets a class defer instantiation to subclasses. So it's best used when the implementation of an abstract class is subject to change frequently.If you are not dealing with an abstract classes with multiple implementations.

0

I've read at many places that object creation using the 'new' keyword should be avoided in general

That is a an extreme vision of designing object creation.
The factory approach (public static method) should be favored over public constructor approaches for cases where it makes sense.
Besides, in some other cases the builder pattern is more suitable than them.

I think that you should wonder the question more in terms of usage of the class.
Exposing a public constructor means exposing a specific implementation with no possibility to change internal (implementation, caching, computing or any thing) for clients without breaking the API and forcing clients to change their code.

If the class is exposed to different clients, generally you don't want to expose public constructor for class that could be retrofitted because you don't want to break their existing code later and you don't want to keep flaws/issues in the existing implementation either.

If the class is an internal class of the project, you should add the complexity to define factory or builder in the class only if it brings a value right now.
If it is not the case, as this is an internal you could always refactor the code of your application to use the new way. You will not break multiple client codes.

Is there any case where creating an object directly in the client code is a better idea than using a factory class?

Besides the usage field, I could also quote service classes or entity classes as good candidates for public constructors.
Anemic models and model by layer (DTO for example) are also good candidate to favor public constructors. Logic and consistency being ensured by services that manipulate it.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.