1

In C the strcpy function is used to copy a source into a destination string.

But when I use a destination char array of size 1 the strcpy correctly copies the source into the destination. But it also changes the source char array. I want to understand how this works in C.

I have done some research on how to correctly use strcpy in a program but all of them uses destination size more than 1. I did the program using destination size equal to 1. That's where the problem is.

char a[] = "String ABC";
char b[1];

strcpy(b, a);
int i;
// printf("%c\n", *(&(a[0])-1));

printf("%s\n",a);
printf("%s\n",b);

I expect the output to be

String ABC
String ABC

but the output I get is

tring ABC
String ABC
  • 3
    What problem? UB is UB. – stark May 5 '19 at 17:02
  • Why is the source string's initial character shifting by one place, i.e., a[0]='t' instead of a[0] = 'S'. Why? – The Viper May 5 '19 at 17:05
3

C performs no bounds checking and will let you overrun the bounds of a buffer. The actual behaviour is undefined, but in your case it is likely that the memory arrangement is thus:

 b a
|-|S|t|r|i|n|g|A|B|C|\0|

After the strcpy()

 b a
|S|t|r|i|n|g|A|B|C|\0|\0|

So b contains 'S' and no nul terminator (because there is no room), so when you print it, it runs into a which has "tringABC".

Other results are possible depending on how the compiler orders and aligns adjacent variables, and how the implementation works with overlapping strcpy() source and destination which is also undefined.

3

The problem is that you are copying to 1 byte string a longer string resulting in undefined behaviour.

If you run this program:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    char a[] = "String ABC";
    char b[1];
    printf("%p\n", &a);
    printf("%p\n", &b);

    strcpy(b, a);
    int i;
    printf("%c\n", *(&(a[0])-1));
    printf("%c\n", a[0]);
    printf("%s\n",a);
    printf("%s\n",b);
    printf("%p\n", &a);
    printf("%p\n", &b);
}

you see b and a have contiguous addresses and b is stored in a memory address before a. Most likely strcpy copies the string to b but since b is not allocated to store such a long string, it overwrites the next contiguous memory cell which seems to be a.

Let me indicate with || a memory cell storing a char. Suppose -b- is the cell storing one char long string. Before copy you have

|-b-|---a memory allocation--|
|-b-|S|t|r|i|n|g| |A|B|C|D|\n|

Now a is copied into b: the second cell is the one of a which now contain t

  |--a memory allocation-|
|S|t|r|i|n|g| |A|B|C|D|\n|

This is what I suppose it is happening. But remember that copying a longer string into a shorter one will result in undefined behaviour.

  • 1
    int main(void) – Antti Haapala May 5 '19 at 17:33
  • in C not necesserily – Francesco Boi May 5 '19 at 17:35
  • 1
    @FrancescoBoi: Per C 2018 (and previous versions) 5.1.2.2.1 1, “It [main] shall be defined with a return type of int and with no parameters: int main(void) … or with two parameters … int main(int argc, char *argv[])… or in some other implementation-defined manner.” – Eric Postpischil May 5 '19 at 17:50
  • Ok I will correct... anyway just to let you know it did not even generated a warning – Francesco Boi May 5 '19 at 18:54
1

You cannot copy a into b, because there is not enough space in b. The strcpy function will simply write past the end of the array, which is undefined behavior. This means the program can behave in any unpredictable way (which sometimes, if you are unlucky, means it works as you expected).

In other words: when you use strcpy, you must ensure the destination buffer is big enough, including the null terminator. In this particular example, it means that b has to be, at least, 11 elements long (10 for the string, 1 for the null terminator).

  • But it works fine if I set the buffer to size 2. In case of 'char b[2];', my source remains same i.e., a[0]='S', and not a[0]='t', why? – The Viper May 5 '19 at 17:06
  • 1
    It SEEMS like it "works fine" when the size of b is 2, but it does not work fine because you're overwriting memory that could have important things in it. You're just getting lucky. When using strcpy, it is your responsibility to make absolutely sure that the destination is AT LEAST the length of the string you are copying, +1 for the null terminator. If it isn't, you are going to have big big problems.. eventually. – little_birdie May 5 '19 at 17:10
  • @TheViper if it works for you- code this way :). It is a free country. What problem do you have? – P__J__ May 5 '19 at 17:18
1

Funny, my compiler behaves differently: When compiling it issues a warning:

% gcc strcpy.c -O3
In file included from /usr/include/string.h:494:0,
                 from strcpy.c:1:
In function ‘strcpy’,
    inlined from ‘main’ at strcpy.c:8:5:
/usr/include/x86_64-linux-gnu/bits/string_fortified.h:90:10: warning:
         ‘__builtin___memcpy_chk’ writing 11 bytes into a region of size 1 overflows the
         destination [-Wstringop-overflow=]
   return __builtin___strcpy_chk (__dest, __src, __bos (__dest));
          ^~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

And when I run the program, it aborts:

% ./a.out                       
*** buffer overflow detected ***: ./a.out terminated
0

As @Acorn mentioned in his answer, the behavior you are seeing is undefined behavior, which means that the compiler is free to generate arbitrary code.

However, if you want to investigate what's happening here (purely for curiosity), it can help to print out the addresses of the arrays.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(){
    char a[] = "String ABC";
    char b[1];

    strcpy(b, a);
    int i;
    // printf("%c\n", *(&(a[0])-1));

    printf("%s\n",a);
    printf("%s\n",b);

    printf("%p\n",a);
    printf("%p\n",b);
}

On my machine, the output is the following.

ring ABC
String ABC
0x7ffc36f1b29d
0x7ffc36f1b29c

As you can see, the two array pointers differ by only one. When you copy the source into destination, you've overwritten the first N-1 characters of the source array with the last N-1 characters of the source, where N is the number of characters in the source, including the null terminator.

  • which means that the compiler is free to generate arbitrary code who did tell you that ? Compiler generates code as usually but the result of its execution is undefined/ – P__J__ May 5 '19 at 17:13
  • @P__J__, The wikipedia article on undefined behavior states of the compiler that the implementation will be considered correct whatever it does in such cases. I interpret that to mean the compiler is free to generate arbitrary code. – merlin2011 May 5 '19 at 17:33
  • @P__J__: The C standard imposes no requirements on undefined behavior, including code generation. Undefined behavior can affect code generation because many compilers analyze code in sophisticated ways as part of optimization, and undefined behavior can lead to various reductions and transformations of the code during optimization, resulting in different code generation when undefined behavior is present. Yes, if there is undefined behavior on a coce path, the compiler is free, per the C standard, to generate arbitrary code for it. – Eric Postpischil May 5 '19 at 17:37
  • @P__J__: As one example, consider the code fragment if (some test) { arbitrary code } else { code with undefined behavior } in some larger context. During optimization, the compiler can reason that some test may be assumed to be always true—because either it is true or the code will execute undefined behavior, for which the compiler is allowed to behave in any way, including as if some test is true. Therefore, the else branch can be removed, and the code can be reduced to { arbitrary code }. Thus, for the undefined behavior, the program effectively executes arbitrary code. – Eric Postpischil May 5 '19 at 17:40
  • @EricPostpischil or which the compiler is allowed to behave in any way it is not allowed. Actually there are two types of UBs. One is related to the compilator behavior, another to runtime behavior. Example of the first one is a = a++ + ++a;, example of anther is writing outside the array bounds. The latter will not affect the compiler code generation. – P__J__ May 5 '19 at 18:20

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