32

I have a snippet of code that change a counter in two threads. It's not thread safe because I didn't put any atomic variable or lock in the code. It gives the right result as I expected if the code only run once, but I want to run it for several times, so I put the code into a for loop. And the question is that only the first or the first two loops will generate the result I expect. For the rest of the loops, the results are always 0, which seems to be thread safe. Is there any inner operator in Java Virtual Machine resulting such thing?

I have tried change the number of loops, and the first one or two are always what I expect, but the others are 0 no matter how many loops there are.

Counter:

private static class Counter {
    private int count;

    public void increase() {
        count++;
    }

    public void decrease() {
        count--;
    }

    public int getCount() {
        return count;
    }
}

Person:

// This is just a thread to increase and decrease the counter for many times.
private static class Person extends Thread {
    private Counter c;

    public Person(Counter c) {
        this.c = c;
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        for (int i = 0; i < 100000; i++) {
            c.increase();
            c.decrease();
        }
    }
}

Main method:

public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        Counter c = new Counter();
        Person p1 = new Person(c);
        Person p2 = new Person(c);
        p1.start();
        p2.start();
        p1.join();
        p2.join();
        System.out.println("run "+i+": "+c.getCount());        
   }
}

Output:

run 0: 243
run 1: 12
run 2: 0
run 3: 0
run 4: 0
run 5: 0
run 6: 0
run 7: 0
run 8: 0
run 9: 0

I don't know why the rest of the results are always 0. But I guess it's about the optimization of JVM. Is it right that the JVM optimizes the code when some loops have been done, and it omits the rest loops and always gives 0 as answer?

  • 3
    @Thomas - the OP tells you that they get a non-zero result in the first two times. That actually makes sense because increase and decrease are not atomic, and therefore there is a chance of one thread undoing the increase made by another thread. E.g. both T1 and T2 see value 2, then T1 increases to 3 and saves, then T2 increases to 3 and saves. The increase made by T1 is lost. – RealSkeptic May 6 at 9:44
  • 1
    Basically the just-in-time compiler (JIT) will kick in eventually and the switch to that compiled version might happen after the first or second iteration. There are a number of optimizations which probably also depend on the JVM vendor and version and one such optimization might be that increment and decrement are "collapsed" into a non-operation. – Thomas May 6 at 9:52
  • 7
    I actually think what happens is that the JIT optimizes the count variable to be a local CPU register, which means threads running on separate cores will see their own copy and not see other threads' changes. It would be interesting to change it to volatile. – RealSkeptic May 6 at 9:56
  • 4
    Without volatile the compiler can pretty much do what it wants... There is nothing in your code that says that the changes to Counter need to be made visible to other threads at all. So I guess the JIT compiled this code away completely. But that is not guaranteed behaviour either. So I don't know what useful answer there can be here. Undefined behaviour does funny things. – Thilo May 6 at 10:02
  • 4
    There's multiple ways that can explain this. A series of very stupid, trivial compiler optimizations: Step 1 - inline increase and decrease. Step 2 - optimize away ++ followed by -- would be one thing. Possibly followed by eliminating the now-empty loop completely. – Jörg W Mittag May 6 at 13:16
15

I think the JVM is optimizing here like you said.

I added some outputs with timings to your question, which clearly show, that optimization happens there.

public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {

    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        final long startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
        Counter c = new Counter();
        Person p1 = new Person(c);
        Person p2 = new Person(c);
        p1.start();
        p2.start();
        p1.join();
        p2.join();
        final long endTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
        System.out.println(String.format("run %s: %s (%s ms)", i, c.getCount(), endTime - startTime));        
   }
}

Results:

run 0: 1107 (8 ms)
run 1: 1 (1 ms)
run 2: 0 (2 ms)
run 3: 0 (0 ms)
run 4: 0 (0 ms)
run 5: 0 (0 ms)
run 6: 0 (1 ms)
run 7: 0 (0 ms)
run 8: 0 (0 ms)
run 9: 0 (0 ms)

The first iterations the program needs a lot of time, wheras in later execution nearly no time at all is used.

Seems to be legit to suspect optimazation for this behaviour.

Using a volatile int count:

run 0: 8680 (15 ms)
run 1: 6943 (12 ms)
run 2: 446 (7 ms)
run 3: -398 (7 ms)
run 4: 431 (8 ms)
run 5: -5489 (6 ms)
run 6: 237 (7 ms)
run 7: 122 (7 ms)
run 8: -87 (7 ms)
run 9: 112 (7 ms)
  • 7
    It’s really important to emphasize that the JVM does not optimize “for thread safety” as the question’s title suggests, but just for performance by eliminating redundant operations. So any real life example doing something other than an entirely obsolete loop will likely break, whether optimized or not, sometimes even worse when optimized. – Holger May 6 at 12:19
  • No optimization necessary. It could simply be that each thread is getting an early copy of the variable into the processor's cache. volatile forces all accesses to go to RAM, ensuring the threads can't miss each other's read/writes. You'd need to show that the bytecode eliminates operations to prove optimization, but it's more likely that volatile adds operations that wouldn't normally be there. – jpmc26 May 6 at 15:10
  • 2
    @jpmc26 "volatile forces all accesses to go to RAM" since this is an often heard mistake: No it doesn't and thinking about it in such terms is quite dangerous. The JMM does not deal with things such as RAM, but defines simply what guarantees are enforced. That sounds like nitpicking, until one realizes that e.g. the x86 cache coherence protocol does not require changes being written back to main memory immediately. – Voo May 6 at 16:15
  • @Voo In which regard is this "dangerous"? The Java Memory Model makes quite clear guarantees about volatile, and the necessary fences are inserted in order to really observe the behavior that can be described as "everything goes directly to RAM" (or less technical, more theoretical: ~"all threads always see the same value"). The fact that ++ and -- are not atomic still messes things up here, of course... – Marco13 May 6 at 20:52
  • @Marco The original memory model for volatile was basically what you describe. And then people figured out that it was a meaningless property. The memory model is about much more than "all threads always see the same value". It is mostly about visibility guarantees and what possible values you are allowed to see and not. Your simplified definition of volatile could not be used to safely publish any data, It also brings up interesting questions about things such as where you'd get a global reference time to figure out which write came "first". – Voo May 6 at 21:03
26

This took a surprising turn.

The first thing that one can say (relatively sure) is that the effect is caused by the JIT. I combined the code snippets into this MCVE:

public class CounterJitTest
{
    private static class Counter
    {
        private int count;

        public void increase()
        {
            count++;
        }

        public void decrease()
        {
            count--;
        }

        public int getCount()
        {
            return count;
        }
    }

    private static class Person extends Thread
    {
        private Counter c;

        public Person(Counter c)
        {
            this.c = c;
        }

        @Override
        public void run()
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
            {
                c.increase();
                c.decrease();
            }
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        {
            Counter c = new Counter();
            Person p1 = new Person(c);
            Person p2 = new Person(c);
            p1.start();
            p2.start();
            p1.join();
            p2.join();
            System.out.println("run " + i + ": " + c.getCount());
        }
    }
}

Running it with

java CounterJitTest

causes the output that was mentioned in the question:

run 0: 6703
run 1: 178
run 2: 1716
run 3: 0
run 4: 0
run 5: 0
run 6: 0
run 7: 0
run 8: 0
run 9: 0

Turning off the JIT with -Xint (interpreted mode), that is, starting it as

java -Xint CounterJitTest

causes the following results:

run 0: 38735
run 1: 53174
run 2: 86770
run 3: 27244
run 4: 61885
run 5: 1746
run 6: 32458
run 7: 52864
run 8: 75978
run 9: 22824

In order to dive deeper into what the JIT actually does, I started the whole thing in a HotSpot disassembler VM, to have a look at the generated assembly. However, the execution time was so fast that I thought: Well, I'll just increase the counter in the for-loop:

for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)

But even increasing it to 100000000 caused the program to finish immediately. That already raised a suspicion. After generating the disassembly with

java -server -XX:+UnlockDiagnosticVMOptions -XX:+TraceClassLoading -XX:+LogCompilation -XX:+PrintAssembly -XX:+PrintInlining CounterJitTest

I looked at the compiled versions of the increase and decrease methods, but didn't find anything obvious. However, the run method seemed to be the culprit here. Initially, the assembly of the run method contained the expected code (only posting the most relevant parts here) :

Decoding compiled method 0x0000000002b32fd0:
Code:
[Entry Point]
[Constants]
  # {method} {0x00000000246d0f00} &apos;run&apos; &apos;()V&apos; in &apos;CounterJitTest$Person&apos;
  ...
[Verified Entry Point]
  ...
  0x0000000002b33198: je     0x0000000002b33338  ;*iconst_0
            ; - CounterJitTest$Person::run@0 (line 35)

  0x0000000002b3319e: mov    $0x0,%esi
  0x0000000002b331a3: jmpq   0x0000000002b332bc  ;*iload_1
            ; - CounterJitTest$Person::run@2 (line 35)

  0x0000000002b331a8: mov    0x178(%rdx),%edi   ; implicit exception: dispatches to 0x0000000002b3334f
  0x0000000002b331ae: shl    $0x3,%rdi          ;*getfield c
            ; - CounterJitTest$Person::run@9 (line 37)

  0x0000000002b331b2: cmp    (%rdi),%rax        ;*invokevirtual increase
            ; - CounterJitTest$Person::run@12 (line 37)
            ; implicit exception: dispatches to 0x0000000002b33354
  ...
  0x0000000002b33207: je     0x0000000002b33359
  0x0000000002b3320d: mov    0xc(%rdi),%ebx     ;*getfield count
            ; - CounterJitTest$Counter::increase@2 (line 9)
            ; - CounterJitTest$Person::run@12 (line 37)

  0x0000000002b33210: inc    %ebx
  0x0000000002b33212: mov    %ebx,0xc(%rdi)     ;*putfield count
            ; - CounterJitTest$Counter::increase@7 (line 9)
            ; - CounterJitTest$Person::run@12 (line 37)
  ...
  0x0000000002b3326f: mov    %ebx,0xc(%rdi)     ;*putfield count
            ; - CounterJitTest$Counter::decrease@7 (line 14)
            ; - CounterJitTest$Person::run@19 (line 38)

  ...

I don't deeply "understand" this, admittedly, but one can see that it does a getfield c, and some invocations of the (partially inlined?) increase and decrease methods.

However, the final compiled version of the run method is this:

Decoding compiled method 0x0000000002b34590:
Code:
[Entry Point]
[Constants]
  # {method} {0x00000000246d0f00} &apos;run&apos; &apos;()V&apos; in &apos;CounterJitTest$Person&apos;
  #           [sp+0x20]  (sp of caller)
  0x0000000002b346c0: mov    0x8(%rdx),%r10d
  0x0000000002b346c4: 
<writer thread='2060'/>
[Loaded java.lang.Shutdown from C:\Program Files\Java\jre1.8.0_131\lib\rt.jar]
<writer thread='5944'/>
shl    $0x3,%r10
  0x0000000002b346c8: cmp    %r10,%rax
  0x0000000002b346cb: jne    0x0000000002a65f60  ;   {runtime_call}
  0x0000000002b346d1: data32 xchg %ax,%ax
  0x0000000002b346d4: nopw   0x0(%rax,%rax,1)
  0x0000000002b346da: nopw   0x0(%rax,%rax,1)
[Verified Entry Point]
  0x0000000002b346e0: mov    %eax,-0x6000(%rsp)
  0x0000000002b346e7: push   %rbp
  0x0000000002b346e8: sub    $0x10,%rsp         ;*synchronization entry
            ; - CounterJitTest$Person::run@-1 (line 35)

  0x0000000002b346ec: cmp    0x178(%rdx),%r12d
  0x0000000002b346f3: je     0x0000000002b34701
  0x0000000002b346f5: add    $0x10,%rsp
  0x0000000002b346f9: pop    %rbp
  0x0000000002b346fa: test   %eax,-0x1a24700(%rip)        # 0x0000000001110000
            ;   {poll_return}
  0x0000000002b34700: retq   
  0x0000000002b34701: mov    %rdx,%rbp
  0x0000000002b34704: mov    $0xffffff86,%edx
  0x0000000002b34709: xchg   %ax,%ax
  0x0000000002b3470b: callq  0x0000000002a657a0  ; OopMap{rbp=Oop off=80}
            ;*aload_0
            ; - CounterJitTest$Person::run@8 (line 37)
            ;   {runtime_call}
  0x0000000002b34710: int3                      ;*aload_0
            ; - CounterJitTest$Person::run@8 (line 37)

  0x0000000002b34711: hlt    
  0x0000000002b34712: hlt    
  0x0000000002b34713: hlt    
  0x0000000002b34714: hlt    
  0x0000000002b34715: hlt    
  0x0000000002b34716: hlt    
  0x0000000002b34717: hlt    
  0x0000000002b34718: hlt    
  0x0000000002b34719: hlt    
  0x0000000002b3471a: hlt    
  0x0000000002b3471b: hlt    
  0x0000000002b3471c: hlt    
  0x0000000002b3471d: hlt    
  0x0000000002b3471e: hlt    
  0x0000000002b3471f: hlt    
[Exception Handler]
[Stub Code]
  0x0000000002b34720: jmpq   0x0000000002a8c9e0  ;   {no_reloc}
[Deopt Handler Code]
  0x0000000002b34725: callq  0x0000000002b3472a
  0x0000000002b3472a: subq   $0x5,(%rsp)
  0x0000000002b3472f: jmpq   0x0000000002a67200  ;   {runtime_call}
  0x0000000002b34734: hlt    
  0x0000000002b34735: hlt    
  0x0000000002b34736: hlt    
  0x0000000002b34737: hlt    

This is the complete assembly of the method! And it does ... well, basically nothing.

To confirm my suspicion, I explicitly disabled the inlining of the increase method, by starting with

java -XX:CompileCommand=dontinline,CounterJitTest$Counter.increase CounterJitTest

And the output was again the expected one:

run 0: 3497
run 1: -71826
run 2: -22080
run 3: -20893
run 4: -17
run 5: -87781
run 6: -11
run 7: -380
run 8: -43354
run 9: -29719

So my conclusion is:

The JIT inlines the increase and decrease methods. They only increment and decrement the same value. And after inlining, the JIT is smart enough to figure out that the sequence of calls to

c.increase();
c.decrease();

is essentially a no-op, and hence, just does exactly that: Nothing.

6

You can't be sure that a multithread code incrementing and decrementing a variable will always give 0 as result.

TO be sure you can:

  • Synchronize access to the Counter object
  • Use inside the Counter object an AtomicInteger

Infact the code count++ or count-- is not thread safe. Internally it is equivalent to something similar to the following:

load count     - load count from ram to the registry
increment count - increment by 1
store count    - save from the registry to ram

But this code can have this behaviour if called by two threads

    first                             second                           ram
    ----------                        --------                         ------
                                                                       count = 0
    load count
                                      load count
    (here count in registry == 0)     (here count in the second registry == 0)

    increment count       
                                      increment count

    (here count in registry == 1)     (here count in the second registry == 1)

    store count           
                                      store count
                                                                        count == 1

Knowing that you can't assume nothing on the real behaviour of this not synchronized code.

It depends from many factor, for example:

  • number of processors
  • speed of execution of the increment and decrement code
  • kind of processors (the behaviour can be different for a I7 machine and for an Atom processor)
  • JVM Implementation (you can have different behaviours for Open JDK or Oracle JVM)
  • Load of the CPU
  • Absence or presence of execution of the GC process

You know that this code is thread unsafe. You can't try to predict any behaviour on that code that is reproducible on other pc or using a different configurations or also in the same machine with the same configuration because you can't control what happens outside the JVM (load of the CPU by other applications).


Additional note: microbenchmarks have a side effect related to the fact that some of the resources are not yet loaded. In your code the race condition can be more frequent on the first iterations because classes Counter and Person are not yet loaded (note that also the execution time for the first iteration is much longer than the others).

  • 11
    This doesn't answer the question. The OP knows the program is not thread-safe and is trying to demonstrate that, but for some reason, the race condition seems to magically disappear as of the third loop. That's what the OP is asking about. – RealSkeptic May 6 at 9:53
  • 3
    To be honest: The currently accepted answer is not much "better" than this one, because it also reads a bit like handwaving "yeah, that's some sort of optimization". It doesn't really dive into what kind of optimization and how it explains the observed behavior. – Marco13 May 6 at 10:19
  • 3
    @SirFartALot You can't say that it happens much rarer. You can say only that in the test that You created it seems that it happens rarer. Please see the updated answer to know why you can't say nothing for sure. – Davide Lorenzo MARINO May 6 at 10:49
  • 3
    @RealSkeptic as you said this is "magic" because is not under your control. Trying to investigate on that is something that goes over what is predictable. What is sure is that the code is not safe and that You can't say if and when a race condition happens. The only sense thing to do is to remove unsafe code. – Davide Lorenzo MARINO May 6 at 10:53
  • 2
    @RealSkeptic Saying that code that doesn't behave in a threadsafe manner is unpredictable isn't an answer to a question trying to predict the results of code that isn't threadsafe? Sounds like an answer to me. – jpmc26 May 6 at 15:35

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.