3

Let's say I have a class with 3 fields: A, B, and C. I can create an instance of this class in two ways: pass all fields to the constructor, or pass only A and other properties will be calculated based on A.

class MyClass {
    val A: String
    val B: String
    val C: String

    constructor(A: String, B: String, C: String) {
        this.A = A
        this.B = B
        this.C = C
    }

    constructor(A: String) {
        this.A = A
        val (_B, _C) = Calculator.calculate(A)
        this.B = _B
        this.C = _C
    }
}

This approach uses two secondary constructors without primary one. But from my point of view, it looks pretty heavy. Is it possible to rewrite this logic in a more elegant way?

  • 2
    what does calculate return? as it is destructurable, may the same type be OK in MyClass itself? – Roland May 6 at 13:09
  • 1
    It returns Pair<String, String> – Feedforward May 6 at 13:11
3

Maybe something as follows might be ok for you. You may want to replace Pair with an actual type then instead...

class MyClass(
        val A: String,
        val BC : Pair<String, String>
) {
    constructor(A: String, B: String, C: String) : this(A, B to C) // is this then even needed?
    constructor(A : String) : this(A, Calculator.calculate(A))
}

Or alternatively if it makes more sense to have the three separate properties, the other way around, which was also shown by k0enf0rNL :

class MyClass(
     val A: String,
     val B: String,
     val C: String
) {
  constructor(A: String) : this(A, Calculator.calculate(A))
  constructor(A: String, BC : Pair<String, String>) : this(A, BC.first, BC.second)
}

Finally, if you do not want to expose some of the constructors, feel free to mark them private, e.g. the following will expose the same as your shown example:

class MyClass(
     val A: String,
     val B: String,
     val C: String
) {
  constructor(A: String) : this(A, Calculator.calculate(A))
  private constructor(A: String, BC : Pair<String, String>) : this(A, BC.first, BC.second)
}

Maybe you rather need something to pass a function instead (as you also used Calculator.calculate(A)). Then you may want to add the following as a constructor:

constructor(A : String, func: (String) -> Pair<String, String> = Calculator::calculate) : this(A, func(A))

If this is rather what you wanted from the beginning, then even a class such as the following might be something for you:

class MyClass(val A: String,
              func: (String) -> Pair<String, String> = Calculator::calculate) {
    val B: String
    val C: String

    init {
        func(A).also { (newB, newC) ->
            B = newB
            C = newC
        }
    }
}

If you then just want to pass A, B and C without an actual calculation (or passed function), you can still do it as follows (basically discarding the passed A):

MyClass("myA") { /* _ -> */ /* A -> */
   "myCalculatedB" to "C"
}
2

My personal favourite is to abuse companion object invoke operator:

class MyClass(val A: String, val B: String, val C: String) {

    companion object {
        operator fun invoke(A: String): MyClass {
            val (B, C) = Calculator.calculate(A)
            return MyClass(A, B, C)
        }
    }
}
  • I only dislike the word "abuse" here ;-) what I like on that variant is, that you can easily move such functions outside the class using extension functions on the Companion, which therefore also easily allows adding additional variants... – Roland May 6 at 14:45
  • I would even use a direct assignment for the invoke... it doesn't do that much, so you can still easily grasp it, e.g.: operator fun invoke(A: String) = Calculator.calculate(A).let { (B, C) -> MyClass(A, B, C) } (new lines where appropriate) – Roland May 6 at 14:49
  • @Roland I though of it, even already edited my answer but discarded. In the general case there could be more than just one external calculation, and things could get ugly with .let version. – xinaiz May 6 at 15:26
0

You could write it as a data class and at least get rid of the default constructor like so

data class MyClass(
    val A: String,
    val B: String,
    val C: String
) {
    constructor(A: String, calculated: Pair<String, String> = calculate()) : this(
        A,
        calculated.first,
        calculated.second
    )
}

fun calculate() : Pair<String, String> = "this" to "that"
  • My mistake, I messed up the constructor implementation. Fixed it now. – k0enf0rNL May 6 at 13:11
  • 1
    regarding your comment in the answer: I don't think so... but you can still add an additional constructor for that, e.g.: constructor(A: String, BC : Pair<String, String>) : this(A, BC.first, BC.second) – Roland May 6 at 13:20
  • 2
    Whether it's a data class isn't really relevant here. – Alexey Romanov May 6 at 15:59
  • Yes, you are correct – k0enf0rNL May 7 at 10:10

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