2

I am trying to figure out which column, or columns, is tripping the error below. Something changed about the incoming data, fed by a 3rd party service and it is now causing failures when I try to save it to SQL.

Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.DbUpdateException: An error occurred while updating the entries. See the inner exception for details. ---> System.Data.SqlClient.SqlException: Arithmetic overflow error converting numeric to data type numeric. The statement has been terminated.

A very simple flow:

  • Read 3rd party API as JSON
  • Use newtonsoft to convert directly to EF data model class
  • Add record(s) to DB then save.

Data structure is defined as:

[JsonObject(MemberSerialization.OptIn)]
public class RatDbAttributes
{
    [JsonProperty]
    [StringLength(50)]
    public string block_chain { get; set; } // varchar(50)
    [JsonProperty]
    [StringLength(50)]
    public string block_reduction { get; set; } // varchar(50)
    [JsonProperty]
    [StringLength(50)]
    public string block_reward { get; set; } // varchar(50)
    [JsonProperty]
    public double block_time { get; set; } // decimal(28,6)
    [JsonProperty]
    [StringLength(100)]
    public string consensus_method { get; set; } // varchar(100)
    [JsonProperty]
    public decimal decimals { get; set; } // decimal(28,6)
    [JsonProperty]
    [StringLength(50)]
    public string difficulty_retarget { get; set; } // varchar(50)
    [JsonProperty]
    [StringLength(200)]
    public string genesis_address { get; set; } // varchar(200)
    [JsonProperty]
    [StringLength(100)]
    public string hash_algorithm { get; set; } // varchar(100)
    [JsonProperty]
    [StringLength(50)]
    public string mineable { get; set; } // varchar(50)
    [JsonProperty]
    public long p2p_port { get; set; } // bigint
    [JsonProperty]
    public long rpc_port { get; set; } // bigint
    [JsonProperty]
    [StringLength(200)]
    public string token_role { get; set; } // varchar(200)
    [JsonProperty]
    public decimal @float { get; set; } // decimal(28,6)
    [JsonProperty]
    public decimal minted { get; set; } // decimal(28,6)
    [JsonProperty]
    public decimal total_supply { get; set; } // decimal(28,6)
    [JsonProperty]
    public decimal max_supply { get; set; } // decimal(28,6)
    [JsonProperty]
    [StringLength(133)]
    public string wallet { get; set; } // varchar(133)
    [JsonProperty]
    [NotMapped]
    public double genesis_timestamp { get; set; } // see below

    [JsonIgnore]
    public DateTime Genesis_TimeStamp { get { return genesis_timestamp.ToDateTime(); } set { genesis_timestamp = value.ToEpoch(); } }


    // Foregin Key Relationship (1-to-1) and Primary Key
    [JsonIgnore]
    public long TokenMasterId { get; set; }
    [JsonIgnore]
    [ForeignKey("TokenMasterId")]
    public RatDbTokenMaster TokenMaster { get; set; } //foreign key to Parent
}

I've double checked the genesis_timestamp and that is not the problem (converting double to datetime).

Sample incoming failing JSON:

{"block_chain":""
,"block_reduction":""
,"block_reward":"0"
,"block_time":0.0
,"consensus_method":""
,"decimals":0.0
,"difficulty_retarget":""
,"genesis_address":""
,"hash_algorithm":""
,"mineable":"False"
,"p2p_port":0
,"rpc_port":0
,"token_role":""
,"float":0.0
,"minted":0.0
,"total_supply":0.0
,"max_supply":0.0
,"wallet":""
,"genesis_timestamp":0.0
}
  • When I updated to DotNet Core I found that it was more strict when using a model reading in data. For instance I had [Required] on a field because I used the same class in a view. In DotNet Core 1.0 this did not cause a problem when reading a stream if the data had some empty fields. In Core 2.2 it blew up. When I removed the [Required ]attribute, it worked fine. Therefore, if I were you I would remove some of those attributes like StringLength and see if it makes a difference. – Dan May 6 '19 at 17:58
  • Right there with you. I went the opposite way. I added the [StringLength] attribs to see if a string length error would popup. I've run it both ways. The bigger picture, all 9 tables, except this one, run flawlessly. – Keith Barrows May 6 '19 at 18:01
  • Unfortunately Core 2.2 did not tell me the problem was data validation. I had to figure it out myself. I got pretty much the same error message you are getting. – Dan May 6 '19 at 18:04
  • 1
    Check if you have any trigger or auto field calculation present on DB level, normally this error comes if given value is too large to fit in, e.g. decimal(5, 2) can hold 3 digits before decimal, 1234 won't fit in decimal(5, 2). You can also run SQL Profiler to exactly see what query is being executed. – sallushan May 6 '19 at 18:52
0

I created a fail-over iterative save for when a batch fails. Since I made my database connection "global" for this class I was inadvertantly running into a problem. I would add the recordset and try to save it (error pops), then try to iterate smaller and smaller batches to discover the offending record(s). The problem was I did not remove the offending recordset before iterating. Therefore, every iteration carried the error condition in the DB connection!

    internal void IterateSave<TModel>(List<TModel> items) where TModel : class
    {
        using (LogContext.PushProperty("Data: Class", nameof(RatBaseCommandHandler)))
        using (LogContext.PushProperty("Data: Method", nameof(IterateSave)))
        using (LogContext.PushProperty("Data: Model", nameof(items)))
        {
            int max = items.Count;
            int skip = 0;
            int take = (max > 20) ? (max / 5) : 1;
            int lastTake = take;
            List<TModel> subItems = new List<TModel>();

            while (skip <= max)
            {
                try
                {
                    subItems = items.Skip(skip).Take(take).ToList();
                    Log.Verbose("Working {Max} | {Take} | {Skip}", max, take, skip);

                    skip += take;
                    _db.Set<TModel>().AddRange(subItems);
                    _db.SaveChanges();
                }
                catch (Exception ex)
                {
/***** Was not removing the faulty record/recordset! *****/
                    _db.Set<TModel>().RemoveRange(subItems);
/***** Was not removing the faulty record/recordset! *****/

                    if (take == 1 && skip < max)
                    {
                        Log.Error(ex, "Error saving specific record in this data batch! {GuiltyRecord}", JsonConvert.SerializeObject(subItems));
                        if (skip >= max - 1)
                        {
                            depth--;
                            return;
                        }
                    }
                    else if (take > 1)
                    {
                        Log.Warning("Something is wrong saving this data batch! {RecordCount}  Running a smaller batch to isolate.", take);
                        IterateSave(subItems);
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }

With those 2 lines added (commented section in catch) the error literally popped right out!

Error saving specific record in this data batch! "[{\"block_chain\":\"Ethereum\",\"block_reduction\":\"\",\"block_reward\":\"0\",\"block_time\":0.0,\"consensus_method\":\"\",\"decimals\":18.0,\"difficulty_retarget\":\"\",\"genesis_address\":\"0x3520ba6a529b2504a28eebda47d255db73966694\",\"hash_algorithm\":\"\",\"mineable\":\"False\",\"p2p_port\":0,\"rpc_port\":0,\"token_role\":\"\",\"float\":0.0,\"minted\":60000000000000000000000000.0,\"total_supply\":60000000000000000000000000.0,\"max_supply\":60000000000000000000000000.0,\"wallet\":\"\",\"genesis_timestamp\":0.0}]" Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.DbUpdateException: An error occurred while updating the entries. See the inner exception for details. ---> System.Data.SqlClient.SqlException: Arithmetic overflow error converting numeric to data type numeric. The statement has been terminated.

While C# can handle 60000000000000000000000000.0 in a DECIMAL data type, our SQL is defined at DECIMAL(28,6). Because of the 6 digit precision that only leaves space for a 10^22 value.

(It appears that SQL can now handle DECIMAL(38,6). Time to play with column definitions without losing production data.)

  • In other words, the error was accurate and the problem was the wrong size in the database field. decimal(38,6) was always supported, it's not a new addition. JSON added nothing but noise. The best way to troubleshoot such errors is to log the SQL statement that causes the error and execute it directly. You can configure that in EF itself or you can use SQL Server Profiler – Panagiotis Kanavos May 7 '19 at 14:18

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.