2

I am working on Problem 29:

How many distinct terms are in the sequence generated by ab for 2 ≤ a ≤ 100 and 2 ≤ b ≤ 100?

I have done a brute force solution with a filter:

var main = function() {

    var arr = [];

    for (var a = 2; a <= 100; a++) {
        for (var b = 2; b <= 100; b++) {
            arr.push(BigInt(Math.pow(a, b)));
        }
    }
    //arr.sort((a, b) => a - b);

    return arr.filter(function(elem, pos) {
        return arr.indexOf(elem) == pos;
    }).length;
}

console.log(main());

My program executes fine. Although the result I am getting is 9220 where as the correct answer is 9183. What am I missing here?

  • 2
    it's actually off by 37 – Jaromanda X May 7 '19 at 5:33
  • 1
    What's the point of BigInt? – melpomene May 7 '19 at 5:35
  • 2
    I don't have enough reputation to comment, but i just ran this code in my browser (Chrome Version 74.0.3729.131) and this executed as expected and gave me 9183 – Snel23 May 7 '19 at 5:36
  • 2
    Are you on a 32bit system? – Daniel May 7 '19 at 5:37
  • 3
    That makes no sense. You first generate the high powers (and lose precision) and only afterwards do you convert the results to BigInt, where it doesn't matter anymore. – melpomene May 7 '19 at 5:39
0

The problem is that

BigInt(Math.pow(a, b))

Even with BigInt, the expression inside it gets evaluated before it gets passed to BigInt, and Javascript cannot precisely handle huge numbers. The behavior looks to be browser-dependent, unfortunately, the problem is not sufficiently reproducible on every environment.

For a cross-browser solution, you'll have to find another method, like finding the distinct factors of each number, and filtering out numbers with duplicate factor counts. (eg, 2^4's prime factors are 2x2x2x2, same as 4^2 - filter out all such duplicates.)

For example:

const isPrime = num => {
  for(let i = 2; i < num; i++)
    if(num % i === 0) return false;
  return num > 1;
}
const primes = Array.from(
  { length: 100 },
  (_, i) => i + 1
).filter(isPrime);

const addPrimesToObj = (num, prime, obj) => {
  while ((num / prime) % 1 === 0) {
    obj[prime] = (obj[prime] || 0) + 1;
    num = num / prime;
  }
  return num;
};
var main = function() {
  const factorsSet = new Set();
  for (let a = 2; a <= 100; a++) {
    for (let b = 2; b <= 100; b++) {
      const theseFactors = {};
      for (let i = 0; i < b; i++) {
        let innerA = a;
        primes.forEach((prime) => {
          innerA = addPrimesToObj(innerA, prime, theseFactors);
        });
      }
      const factorsStr = Object.entries(theseFactors)
        .map(([key, val]) => `${key}-${val}`)
        .join('_');
      factorsSet.add(factorsStr);
    }
  }
  return factorsSet.size;
}

console.log(main());

| improve this answer | |
  • Okay, thanks. Could you describe what you mean by finding all factors? – Jerome May 7 '19 at 5:41
  • 1
    Do you mean 3*4? – melpomene May 7 '19 at 5:56
  • 1
    Oops, thanks, yeah, that's wrong, 3^4's prime factors would be 3x3x3x3, since we're exponentiating, not multiplying. Separate out all numbers into their prime factor counts, then filter out the duplicate factor counts. – CertainPerformance May 7 '19 at 5:58
1

BigInt have sufficient (arbitrary) precision (support by chrome)

var main = function() {

    var arr = [];

    for (var a = 2; a <= 100; a++) {
        var p= BigInt(a);
        for (var b = 1; b <= 100; b++) {
            if(b>=2) arr.push(p);
            p=p*BigInt(a);
        }
    }

    return arr.filter(function(elem, pos) {
        return arr.indexOf(elem) == pos;
    }).length;
}

console.log(main());

| improve this answer | |
  • This answer is also correct. Although I am not sure why. How do the changes you made with p make the BigInt more accurate than the way I did it? – Jerome May 7 '19 at 6:08
  • 1
    @Jerome because you made Math.pow(a,b) (with low precision) and cast result to BigInt. I first cast a to BigInt and then i calculate power by multiply BigInts numbers in p (and save precision). – Kamil Kiełczewski May 7 '19 at 6:10
  • 1
    @Jerome CertianPerformance solution is probably faster (lower time complexity) and more portable (not use BigInt) because he not calculate powers but rather make prime factorization and check powers - check His answer as accepted – Kamil Kiełczewski May 7 '19 at 6:14
-1

Convert the array to a set, all duplicates will be removed automatically. Return the size of the set

var main = function() {

    var arr = [];

    for (var a = 2; a <= 100; a++) {
        for (var b = 2; b <= 100; b++) {
            arr.push(BigInt(Math.pow(a, b)));
        }
    }
    //arr.sort((a, b) => a - b);

   var e=new Set(arr);
   return e.size()
}

console.log(main());

| improve this answer | |

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