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I know that string literals are objects. According to

https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Java_Programming/Classes,_Objects_and_Types

When an object is created, a reference to the object is also created. The object can not be accessed directly in Java, only through this object reference. This object reference has a type assigned to it. We need this type when passing the object reference to a method as a parameter.

But are we violating this when we have literals access String methods?

For example:

System.out.println("Literal".toUpperCase());

Isn't this directly accessing the object? as opposed to accessing the object through the reference.

For example:

String x = "Literal"; 
System.out.println(x.toUpperCase());
  • You can see "Literal" just like new String("Literal"). String is not really a magic class, it is just creating instance using a specific system – AxelH May 7 at 6:26
  • It works pretty similar to when you call something on the return value of a method someMethod().doSomething(). You do not have a dedicated name (I mean variable) to point to the instance, but you still have a reference to the instance, returned by the method. – Zabuza May 7 at 6:38
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    I find "The object can not be accessed directly in Java, only through this object reference." a non-sensical and confusing remark (your question clearly shows how the remark is confusing) The object reference is what identifies the object instance. You cannot access something if you can't identify it. There is no more "direct" method than this. – Erwin Bolwidt May 7 at 6:38
  • Just a minor note: Strings created using literals come out of the internal String Cache (String interning). As opposed to new String(...) which would always create a fresh new uncached value. – Zabuza May 7 at 6:39
  • @ErwinBolwidt I guess it refers to the memory backing the object, you cannot access that as a value. But you're right, using the term "object" for that is misleading. – Bergi May 7 at 9:07
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Isn't this directly accessing the object? as opposed to accessing the object through the reference.

No, you're still using a reference. The value of an expression which is a string literal is a string reference. It's still not an object that you access directly.

In your example, the value of x is still a reference, and your two snippets are equivalent except for the presence of the variable x.

  • so a string literal is a reference to a string object that holds data that is the string literal? – csguy May 7 at 6:34
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    @omaewa: Well I'd say "that holds the same sequence of characters as is present in the string literal". It's not like there's an extra level of indirection involved - it's just a reference to a string with the right content. – Jon Skeet May 7 at 6:36
  • interesting! and this would be a special feature of strings in java right? – csguy May 7 at 6:40
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    Not so special. There are also class literals, and the null literal is also a literal that evaluates to an object reference. – Erwin Bolwidt May 7 at 6:50
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    @omaewa A reference is not something that is necessarily visible in source code – JollyJoker May 7 at 9:25

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