Suppose I declare a generic List containing values of a struct type:

struct MyStruct {
    public MyStruct(int val1, decimal val2) : this() {
        Val1 = val1;
        Val2 = val2;
    }
    public int Val1 {get; private set;}
    public decimal Val2 {get; private set;}
}

List<MyStruct> list;

Does the List<> store each individual value as a boxed struct, allocated individually on the heap? Or is it smarter than that?

up vote 34 down vote accepted

There is no boxing.

"No, there will be no boxing. That was one of the main design goals of Generics."

http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/csharplanguage/thread/359cf58a-f53d-478e-bc31-1507e77c9454/

"If a value type is used for type T, the compiler generates an implementation of the List<T> class specifically for that value type. That means a list element of a List<T> object does not have to be boxed before the element can be used, and after about 500 list elements are created the memory saved not boxing list elements is greater than the memory used to generate the class implementation."

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/6sh2ey19.aspx

  • What does "and after about 500 list elements are created the memory saved not boxing list elements is greater than the memory used to generate the class implementation" mean? Is it some kind of disadvantage? – Marson Mao Jul 23 '15 at 5:43
  • @MarsonMao There is no disadvantage. Put in other words, it means that if a List<T> were stupid and it did box structs, then the memory used by the list would double at about 500 elements. Since, it doesn't box structs, then the memory used by 500 elements will be considerably less than if it did. – John C Jul 30 '15 at 7:10
  • @Marson Mao Generics in C# are not like C++, they don't always generate code for each unique type. For reference types they'll use the same underlying code as the size of a pointer doesn't change with the type of reference. But for value types the size varies so a version of List<T> must be generated uniquely, this has a memory cost as it means there's now another copy of the List<T> code. Sorry if I'm not being clear. See msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/f4a6ta2h.aspx – Demur Rumed Jun 24 '16 at 19:51

It isn't boxed, but the data will be a copy of the original, and every time you get the data out, it will copy again. This tends to make it easy to lose changes. As such, you should aim to not write mutable structs. Unless MyStruct actually represents a unit-of-measure (or similar), make it a class. And if it is a measure, make it immutable (no public settable members).

And either way, don't expose fields! Use properties ;-p

For example:

struct MyStruct {
    public MyStruct(int val1, decimal val2) {
        this.val1 = val1;
        this.val2 = val2;
    }
    private readonly int val1;
    private readonly decimal val2;
    public int Val1 {get {return val1;}}
    public decimal Val2 {get {return val2;}}
}

Or alternatively (C# 3.0):

struct MyStruct {
    public MyStruct(int val1, decimal val2) : this() {
        Val1 = val1;
        Val2 = val2;
    }
    public int Val1 {get; private set;}
    public decimal Val2 {get; private set;}
}
  • Yep, I appreciate that. Seeing as several people pointed this out, I'll use your struct in the original question, to put the emphasis back onto the boxing and off the value semantics of structs. – Roman Starkov Feb 19 '09 at 7:50

No, List<T> does not box anything. Internally it stores its values in a simple array:

public class List<T> : IList<T>, ICollection<T>, IEnumerable<T>, IList, ICollection,    IEnumerable
{
    // Fields
    private const int _defaultCapacity = 4;
    private static T[] _emptyArray;
    private T[] _items;
    private int _size;
typeof(List<>) // or informally List`1

...is a generic type. Generic types or parameterized types are special in that they are compiled in the normal way but at run-time they are compiled yet again depending on their use.

If you put a ValueType in a generic list e.g. List<int> the run-time behavior is to threat that as if it was storing the type int (which is copy-by-value). Boxing doesn't need to take place because you don't need to treat is as if the type of this List`1 is something other than int.

Before .NET 2.0 this could not be done so the infamous ArrayList class maintained an array of objects which meant ValueType (ints or structs) had to be boxed to be placed in that container.

This is not to be confused with Java generics which is something entirely different. Java generics was implemented with type erasure which does not give you that same performance boost. What Java does is that once the compiler has finished type checking, it will cast everything to object. This is why you cant do reflection with Java generics while you can with the .NET generic type system.

  • I didn't know about the runtime compilation...That's interesting. +1 also for the Java info. – John C Jul 30 '15 at 7:23

List stores everything in arrays of type T. There is no boxing, but the array is allocated on the heap.

There's no boxing, that's why it's a little faster than the non-generic way.

No boxing, that's one of the Benefits of Generics:

List<int> list1 = new List<int>();    
// No boxing, no casting:
list1.Add(3);

// Compile-time error:
// list1.Add("It is raining in Redmond.");

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