5

Consider the following code as an example:

<div id="parent">
  <div id="child">info goes here</div>
</div>

//javascript
function something{
//do something;}
//initial attempt
document.getElementById('parent').addEventListener('click',something);
//event capture
document.getElementById('parent').addEventListener('click',something,true);

When I click on the parent element I would like it to do something, and when I click the child I want it to do nothing. The problem is that when I click in the child element it is triggering 'something'. I thought that it may be event bubbling, such that if I clicked on the child element, the event would bubble up from there to the parent. So then I was thinking about an event capture, but that also causes this problem.

Any advice or suggestions on how to accomplish this would be greatly appreciated.

1

3 Answers 3

8

Instead, add the event only to the parent element, and check if the element originating the event Event.target.closest(selector) - was indeed the desired element selector.
PS: Don't confuse Event.target with Event.currentTarget which (in contrast) is always the Element who has the Event handler attached.

const elParent = document.querySelector("#parent");

function doStuff(evt) {
  if (evt.target.closest("#child")) {
    console.log("Do child stuff only");
  } else {
    console.log("Do parent stuff only (not if child is clicked)");
  }
}

elParent.addEventListener("click", doStuff);

// Additional example on why you should avoid `Event.stopPropagation()`:
document.body.addEventListener("click", () => {
  console.log("(App was notified) Closing some opened popup, etc");
});
// and BODY should always be notified about events! And this works as expected.
#parent, #child {
  padding: 1rem;
  outline: 1px solid red;
}
<div id="parent">
  <b>PARENT</b> ELEMENT
  <div id="child">CHILD ELEMENT</div>
</div>

Don't use Event.stopPropagation()

Event.stopPropagation() would be an idea, but a bad one. We should avoid an application layer to not register an event that occurred deeper in the DOM tree. We should let an event to freely bubble - and eventually notify other elements that such an event happened.
Imagine a body listening for click events in order to close a recently opened custom dropdowns, modal, etc. If you have elements wandering around your app that use Event.stopPropagation() - clicking on such an element the opened dropdown would not close, resulting in a broken UI. And this was just a simple example.
Of course one could catch an event on app-level even if a component uses Event.stopPropagation() by using the Event capture phase {capture: true}, but not many developers do so.

Here's a discouraged(!) way to use Event.stopPropagation() but still catch events on app-wise-level:

const elParent = document.querySelector("#parent");
const elChild = document.querySelector("#child");

function doChildStuff(evt) {
  evt.stopPropagation(); // DISCOURAGED. Avoid 
  console.log("Do child stuff only");
}

function doParentStuff(evt) {
  console.log("Do parent stuff");
}

elChild.addEventListener("click", doChildStuff);
elParent.addEventListener("click", doParentStuff);

// Additional example: proper planning for `Event.stopPropagation()`:
document.body.addEventListener("click", () => {
  console.log("(App was notified) Closing some opened popup, etc");
}, {capture: true}); // PROPER WAY, since we use Event.stopPropagation()
#parent, #child {
  padding: 1rem;
  outline: 1px solid red;
}
<div id="parent">
  <b>PARENT</b> ELEMENT
  <div id="child">CHILD ELEMENT</div>
</div>

3
  • 1
    Nice alternative to the standard answer, and illustrates why using stopPropagation might be a bad idea (ie: other elements like body might need to know about the click). It's also a good approach for a case where a parent might want to ignore clicks on several children, without having to add stopPropagation to each one individually.
    – ericgio
    Commented Nov 16, 2019 at 21:49
  • Exactly. Thank you for the support @ericgio Commented Nov 17, 2019 at 2:21
  • is it safer to use event.currentTarget rather than this to prevent unexpected behaviour in arrow function, so event.currentTarget === event.target
    – nnfans
    Commented Mar 24, 2023 at 3:30
5

Use event.stopPropagation to stop event bubbling:

function something() {
  console.log("something");
}
document.getElementById('parent').addEventListener('click', something);
document.getElementById('child').addEventListener('click', e => e.stopPropagation());
<div id="parent">
  Parent info goes here!
  <div id="child">Child info goes here!</div>
</div>

3
  • Thank you for the answer, it solved my problem. So if I understand correctly, even though I clicked on the child it was still the 'click' event that bubbled up and then triggered the parents listener? Commented May 7, 2019 at 23:21
  • Yes, that's correct - and that's what stopPropagation stops happening. Commented May 7, 2019 at 23:31
  • @PaulCarlson you should better not use Event.stopPropagation() and specially not assigning an event listener to every single element that you want to prevent the event from bubbling. It's incorrect. Commented May 7, 2019 at 23:35
0

It is event bubbling. Just because you are handling the click event on the child, does not mean it stops bubbling to the parent.

There are two approaches to this. The first one is to stop the event from propagating like this: document.getElementById('child').addEventListener('click',(e) => { e.stopPropagation(); something() },true);

The second is to check the event target and only run something when the deepest element that caused the click event is the child element:

document.getElementById('child').addEventListener('click',(e) => { e.target.id == "child" ? something() : nothing() },true);

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