4

Is there any way to Stream the list --> map --> filter --> map back to original object type of list?

There is solution if we are doing it using foreach as below:

List<Query> updatedQueries = getUpdatedQueries();

List<Query> finalQueries = new ArrayList<>();
updatedQueries.forEach(query -> {

    Period period = getPeriodRequest(query);
    boolean isValidPeriod = periodService.validatePeriodicity(period);
    if(isValidPeriod &&  isMandatory(period)){
        finalQueries.add(query);
    }

});

But is there any way to do it using following way ?

List<Query> updatedQueries = getUpdatedQueries();

List<Query> finalQueries = updatedQueries
        .stream()
        .map(this::getPeriodRequest) //returns the object of type Period
        .filter(period->periodService.validatePeriodicity(period))
        .filter(this::isMandatory)
        //is any way we can map back to Query object (without any object translation  function)
        .collect(Collectors.toList());
  • 1
    That's not possible. You should not have mapped it in the first place. You should operate on Query the whole time. – Sweeper May 8 at 6:13
  • You'll be forced to use lambda expressions rather than method references. – ernest_k May 8 at 6:15
7

Try this one

List<Query> finalQueries = updatedQueries
    .stream().filter(query->{
        Period period = getPeriodRequest(query);
        return periodService.validatePeriodicity(period )&& isMandatory(period))
    })
    .collect(Collectors.toList());
  • 1
    It makes sense to what I'm doing in foreach to do inside filter. Thanks for this approach. Better than foreach. – AshwinK May 8 at 6:22
5

You can expand the filter as:

    List<Query> finalQueries = updatedQueries
            .stream()
            .filter(query -> {
                Period period = getPeriodRequest(query);
                return periodService.validatePeriodicity(period) && isMandatory(period);
            })
            .collect(Collectors.toList());
1

First of all your actual result is of type List<Period> finalQueries because of that map(this::getPeriodRequest). Simply use some "longer" lambdas:

 updatedQueries.stream()
               .filter(q -> periodService.validatePeriodicity(q.getPeriodRequest()))
               .filter(q -> isMandatory(q.getPeriodRequest()))
               .collect(Collectors.toList())

You can even compress those two filters into a single one and read q.getPeriodRequest() only once if you really wanted to.

Or you could map to a SimpleEntry for example:

 updatedQueries.stream()
               .map(x -> new SimpleEntry<>(x, x.getPeriodRequest()))
               .filter(e -> periodService.validatePeriodicity(e.getValue()))
               .filter(e -> isMandatory(e.getValue()))
               .map(Entry::getKey)
               .collect(Collectors.toList());
  • 1
    getPeriodRequest() is getting called two times, which is heavier operation in terms of performance. I though about this solution, but it's expensive. – AshwinK May 8 at 6:21
  • 1
    @AshwinK so what if it is called two times? it's a getter only. If you care that much about performance, you should not use a Stream to begin with and stick with what you already have – Eugene May 8 at 6:25
  • Good addition @Eugene, this may be a crucial part in understanding how and when to use Streams. Alone their creation may be tens to hundreds of times slower than just using a simple loop, let alone their iteration. – Lino says Reinstate Monica May 8 at 6:39
  • @Lino if they are the hot-spot though and JIT kicks in - the difference is tiny btw – Eugene May 8 at 6:40
  • @Eugene agreed, but I guess that this is a one time operation, which yields a rather static result. So JIT would probably not really optimize the whole thing. But as said, now I'm just guessing – Lino says Reinstate Monica May 8 at 6:42
0

No. You have to store original object somehow.

Like this

class Pair<A, B> {
    A a;
    B b;
    // constructors and getters skipped
}

Then you can do following:

list.stream()
   .map(x -> new Pair<>(x, getOtherObject()))
   .filter(x -> checkOther(x.getB()))
   .map(Pair::getA)
   .collect(Collectors.toList());
0

Why use Streams in the first place?

updatedQueries.removeIf(query-> {
    Period period = getPeriodRequest(query);
    return !periodService.validatePeriodicity(period) || !isMandatory(period));
});

This removes all elements from updatedQueries which don't match the filter. Behaves the same, but doesn't introduce a new List.

The best approach would probably using just a simple for-loop if you care about performance:

for (Iterator<Query> it = updatedQueries.iterator(); it.hasNext(); ) {
    Period period = getPeriodRequest(it.next());
    if(!periodService.validatePeriodicity(period) || !isMandatory(period))) {
        it.remove();
    }
}

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