39

As part of a program that I'm writing, I need to compare two values in the form a + sqrt(b) where a and b are unsigned integers. As this is part of a tight loop, I'd like this comparison to run as fast as possible. (If it matters, I'm running the code on x86-64 machines, and the unsigned integers are no larger than 10^6. Also, I know for a fact that a1<a2.)

As a stand-alone function, this is what I'm trying to optimize. My numbers are small enough integers that double (or even float) can exactly represent them, but rounding error in sqrt results must not change the outcome.

// known pre-condition: a1 < a2  in case that helps
bool is_smaller(unsigned a1, unsigned b1, unsigned a2, unsigned b2) {
    return a1+sqrt(b1) < a2+sqrt(b2);  // computed mathematically exactly
}

Test case: is_smaller(900000, 1000000, 900001, 998002) should return true, but as shown in comments by @wim computing it with sqrtf() would return false. So would (int)sqrt() to truncate back to integer.

a1+sqrt(b1) = 90100 and a2+sqrt(b2) = 901000.00050050037512481206. The nearest float to that is exactly 90100.


As the sqrt() function is generally quite expensive even on modern x86-64 when fully inlined as a sqrtsd instruction, I'm trying to avoid calling sqrt() as far as possible.

Removing sqrt by squaring potentially also avoids any danger of rounding errors by making all computation exact.

If instead the function was something like this ...

bool is_smaller(unsigned a1, unsigned b1, unsigned x) {
    return a1+sqrt(b1) < x;
}

... then I could just do return x-a1>=0 && static_cast<uint64_t>(x-a1)*(x-a1)>b1;

But now since there are two sqrt(...) terms, I cannot do the same algebraic manipulation.

I could square the values twice, by using this formula:

      a1 + sqrt(b1) = a2 + sqrt(b2)
<==>  a1 - a2 = sqrt(b2) - sqrt(b1)
<==>  (a1 - a2) * (a1 - a2) = b1 + b2 - 2 * sqrt(b1) * sqrt(b2)
<==>  (a1 - a2) * (a1 - a2) = b1 + b2 - 2 * sqrt(b1 * b2)
<==>  (a1 - a2) * (a1 - a2) - (b1 + b2) = - 2 * sqrt(b1 * b2)
<==>  ((b1 + b2) - (a1 - a2) * (a1 - a2)) / 2 = sqrt(b1 * b2)
<==>  ((b1 + b2) - (a1 - a2) * (a1 - a2)) * ((b1 + b2) - (a1 - a2) * (a1 - a2)) / 4 = b1 * b2

Unsigned division by 4 is cheap because it is just a bitshift, but since I square the numbers twice I will need to use 128-bit integers and I will need to introduce a few >=0 checks (because I'm comparing inequality instead of equality).

It feels like there might be a way do this faster, by applying better algebra to this problem. Is there a way to do this faster?

  • 8
    Just an observation: if a1+sqrt(b1)<a2 is true then you can skip the calculation of sqrt(b2). – 500 - Internal Server Error May 8 at 9:06
  • 4
    you can also observe the fact that max(sqrt(b)) = 1000 if b <= 10^6. so you only need to investigate further if abs(a1-a2) <= 1000. otherwise there is always unequality – StPiere May 8 at 9:20
  • 2
    I'm afraid you are going too fast into the code: there's another question "stackoverflow.com/questions/52807071/…", where I've given a way to reduce floating point arithmetic, just by interpreting the use case. Can you explain us the use case, maybe we might come up with a better solution? (What's the meaning of "a1+sqrt(b1)<a2+sqrt(b2)"?) – Dominique May 8 at 9:25
  • 1
    @StPiere: Using a LUT for sqrt is going to be horrible on modern x86 if inputs are fairly uniformly distributed. A 4MiB cache footprint is way bigger than L2 cache size (typically 256kiB), so you'll mostly be getting L3 hits at best, like 45 cycle latency on Skylake. But even on a really old Core 2, single-precision sqrt has worst-case 29 cycle latency. (With a couple more cycles to convert to FP in the first place). On Skylake, FP sqrt latency ~= L2 cache hit latency and is pipelined at throughput = latency/4. Not to mention the impact of cache pollution on other code. – Peter Cordes May 8 at 9:33
  • 2
    Since a1 < a2, you can already exclude directly all cases where b1 < b2 – kvantour May 8 at 10:04
16

Here's a version without sqrt, though I'm not sure whether it is faster than a version which has only one sqrt (it may depend on the distribution of values).

Here's the math (how to remove both sqrts):

ad = a2-a1
bd = b2-b1

a1+sqrt(b1) < a2+sqrt(b2)              // subtract a1
   sqrt(b1) < ad+sqrt(b2)              // square it
        b1  < ad^2+2*ad*sqrt(b2)+b2    // arrange
   ad^2+bd  > -2*ad*sqrt(b2)

Here, the right side is always negative. If the left side is positive, then we have to return true.

If the left side is negative, then we can square the inequality:

ad^4+bd^2+2*bd*ad^2 < 4*ad^2*b2

The key thing to notice here is that if a2>=a1+1000, then is_smaller always returns true (because the maximum value of sqrt(b1) is 1000). If a2<=a1+1000, then ad is a small number, so ad^4 will always fit into 64 bit (there is no need for 128-bit arithmetic). Here's the code:

bool is_smaller(unsigned a1, unsigned b1, unsigned a2, unsigned b2) {
    int ad = a2 - a1;
    if (ad>1000) {
        return true;
    }

    int bd = b2 - b1;
    if (ad*ad+bd>0) {
        return true;
    }

    int ad2 = ad*ad;

    return (long long int)ad2*ad2 + (long long int)bd*bd + 2ll*bd*ad2 < 4ll*ad2*b2;
}

EDIT: As Peter Cordes noticed, the first if is not necessary, as the second if handles it, so the code becomes smaller and faster:

bool is_smaller(unsigned a1, unsigned b1, unsigned a2, unsigned b2) {
    int ad = a2 - a1;
    int bd = b2 - b1;
    if ((long long int)ad*ad+bd>0) {
        return true;
    }

    int ad2 = ad*ad;
    return (long long int)ad2*ad2 + (long long int)bd*bd + 2ll*bd*ad2 < 4ll*ad2*b2;
}
  • 1
    It might be better to omit the ad>1000 branch; I think the ad*ad+bd>0 branch covers everything. One branch that's true most of the time is better than 2 branches that are each taken some of the time, for branch prediction. Unless the ad>1000 check catches most of the inputs, it's going to be worth doing 1 extra sub and imul. (And probably a movzx to 64-bit) – Peter Cordes May 8 at 11:48
  • @PeterCordes: nice observation (as usual :) ), thanks! – geza May 8 at 11:51
  • Oh, were you doing that so ad*ad is known to not overflow an int32_t? After inlining, an x86-64 compiler can optimize away zero-extension to 64-bit (because writing a 32-bit register does that implicitly), so we could promote the unsigned inputs to uint64_t and then subtract to get int64_t. (32-bit subtract would require a movsxd sign-extension of a possibly-negative result, so avoid that.) – Peter Cordes May 8 at 11:51
  • @PeterCordes: almost :) I added it, so ad^4 surely doesn't overflow 64-bit. But yes, as you say, doing the ad*ad multiplication as 64-bit easily handles the case. – geza May 8 at 11:55
  • 1
    @wim: I've verified that my solution is OK. But, I've found that there is some problem with Brendan's second version (and maybe with the first as well) :) – geza May 9 at 7:48
4

I'm tired and probably made a mistake; but I'm sure if I did someone will point it out..

bool is_smaller(unsigned a1, unsigned b1, unsigned a2, unsigned b2) {
    a_diff = a1-a2;   // May be negative

    if(a_diff < 0) {
        if(b1 < b2) {
            return true;
        }
        temp = a_diff+sqrt(b1);
        if(temp < 0) {
            return true;
        }
        return temp*temp < b2;
    } else {
        if(b1 >= b2) {
            return false;
        }
    }
//  return a_diff+sqrt(b1) < sqrt(b2);

    temp = a_diff+sqrt(b1);
    return temp*temp < b2;
}

If you know a1 < a2 then it could become:

bool is_smaller(unsigned a1, unsigned b1, unsigned a2, unsigned b2) {
    a_diff = a2-a1;    // Will be positive

    if(b1 > b2) {
        return false;
    }
    if(b1 >= a_diff*a_diff) {
        return false;
    }
    temp = a_diff+sqrt(b2);
    return b1 < temp*temp;
}
  • 2
    We know a1 < a2, so no need to test for a_diff < 0. But maybe it is worth to test it against > 1000 (reversed). – Acorn May 8 at 10:16
  • 1
    You need a signed difference for int a_diff, and if you want to square it to check the condition without doing an actual sqrt you want int64_t. – Peter Cordes May 8 at 10:22
  • Heh - I did make a mistake (if a_diff+sqrt(b1); is negative then you can't square it without borking the sign) - fixed. Also added the "if you know a1 < a2". – Brendan May 8 at 10:25
  • Just define a_diff = a2 - a1 for the second case. The first check should be b1 <= b2. The first square root you can delay if you just check if b1/a_diff < a_diff – kvantour May 8 at 10:27
  • I'm also tired. Half-finished attempt: godbolt.org/z/U758t6. I think we can use sqrt( abs(b1-b2) ) <= sqrt(b1) - sqrt(b2) (which is true for numbers >= 1.0, and for 0). (ping @kvantour). But maybe better to just check b1 < b2 first / instead, and abs(a1-a2) <= 1000 – Peter Cordes May 8 at 10:32
2

There is also newton method for calculating integer sqrts as described here Another approach would be to not calculate square root, but searching for floor(sqrt(n)) via binary search ... there are "only" 1000 full square numbers less than 10^6. This has probably bad performance, but would be an interesting approach. I haven't measure any of these, but here are examples:

#include <iostream>
#include <array>
#include <algorithm>        // std::lower_bound
#include <cassert>          


bool is_smaller_sqrt(unsigned a1, unsigned b1, unsigned a2, unsigned b2)
{
    return a1 + sqrt(b1) < a2 + sqrt(b2);
}

static std::array<int, 1001> squares;

template <typename C>
void squares_init(C& c)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < c.size(); ++i)
        c[i] = i*i;
}

inline bool greater(const int& l, const int& r)
{
    return r < l;
}

inline bool is_smaller_bsearch(unsigned a1, unsigned b1, unsigned a2, unsigned b2)
{
    // return a1 + sqrt(b1) < a2 + sqrt(b2)

    // find floor(sqrt(b1)) - binary search withing 1000 elems
    auto it_b1 = std::lower_bound(crbegin(squares), crend(squares), b1, greater).base();

    // find floor(sqrt(b2)) - binary search withing 1000 elems
    auto it_b2 = std::lower_bound(crbegin(squares), crend(squares), b2, greater).base();

    return (a2 - a1) > (it_b1 - it_b2);
}

unsigned int sqrt32(unsigned long n)
{
    unsigned int c = 0x8000;
    unsigned int g = 0x8000;

    for (;;) {
        if (g*g > n) {
            g ^= c;
        }

        c >>= 1;

        if (c == 0) {
            return g;
        }

        g |= c;
    }
}

bool is_smaller_sqrt32(unsigned a1, unsigned b1, unsigned a2, unsigned b2)
{
    return a1 + sqrt32(b1) < a2 + sqrt32(b2);
}

int main()
{
    squares_init(squares);

    // now can use is_smaller
    assert(is_smaller_sqrt(1, 4, 3, 1) == is_smaller_sqrt32(1, 4, 3, 1));
    assert(is_smaller_sqrt(1, 2, 3, 3) == is_smaller_sqrt32(1, 2, 3, 3));
    assert(is_smaller_sqrt(1000, 4, 1001, 1) == is_smaller_sqrt32(1000, 4, 1001, 1));
    assert(is_smaller_sqrt(1, 300, 3, 200) == is_smaller_sqrt32(1, 300, 3, 200));
}
  • Your integer sqrt32 runs a fixed 16 iterations of that loop, I think. You could maybe start it from a smaller position based on a bit-scan to find the highest set bit in n and divide by 2. Or just from a lower fixed start point since the known max for n is 1 mil, not ~4 billion. So that's about 12 / 2 = 6 iterations we could save. But this will probably still be slower than converting to single-precision float for sqrtss and back. Maybe if you did two square roots in parallel in the integer loop, so the c updates and loop overhead would be amortized, and there'd be 2 dep chains – Peter Cordes May 8 at 12:49
  • The binary search inverting the table is an interesting idea, but still probably terrible on modern x86-64 where hardware sqrt is not very slow, but branch mispredicts are very costly relative to designs with shorter / simpler pipelines. Maybe some of this answer will be useful to someone with the same problem but on a microcontroller. – Peter Cordes May 8 at 12:52
2

I'm not sure if algebraic manipulations, in combination with integer arithmetic, necessarily leads to the fastest solution. You'll need many scalar multiplies in that case (which isn't very fast), and/or branch prediction may fail, which may degrade performance. Obviously you'll have to benchmark to see which solution is fastest in you particular case.

One method to make the sqrt a bit faster is to add the -fno-math-errno option to gcc or clang. In that case the compiler doesn't have to check for negative inputs. With icc this the default setting.

More performance improvement is possible by using the vectorized sqrt instruction sqrtpd, instead of the scalar sqrt instruction sqrtsd. Peter Cordes has shown that clang is able to auto vectorize this code, such that it generates this sqrtpd.

However the amount success of auto vectorization depends quite heavily on the right compiler settings and the compiler that is used (clang, gcc, icc etc.). With -march=nehalem, or older, clang doesn't vectorize.

More reliable vectorization results are possible with the following intrinsics code, see below. For portability we only assume SSE2 support, which is the x86-64 baseline.

/* gcc -m64 -O3 -fno-math-errno smaller.c                      */
/* Adding e.g. -march=nehalem or -march=skylake might further  */
/* improve the generated code                                  */
/* Note that SSE2 in guaranteed to exist with x86-64           */
#include<immintrin.h>
#include<math.h>
#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdint.h>

int is_smaller_v5(unsigned a1, unsigned b1, unsigned a2, unsigned b2) {
    uint64_t a64    =  (((uint64_t)a2)<<32) | ((uint64_t)a1); /* Avoid too much port 5 pressure by combining 2 32 bit integers in one 64 bit integer */
    uint64_t b64    =  (((uint64_t)b2)<<32) | ((uint64_t)b1); 
    __m128i ax      = _mm_cvtsi64_si128(a64);         /* Move integer from gpr to xmm register                  */
    __m128i bx      = _mm_cvtsi64_si128(b64);         
    __m128d a       = _mm_cvtepi32_pd(ax);            /* Convert 2 integers to double                           */
    __m128d b       = _mm_cvtepi32_pd(bx);            /* We don't need _mm_cvtepu32_pd since a,b < 1e6          */
    __m128d sqrt_b  = _mm_sqrt_pd(b);                 /* Vectorized sqrt: compute 2 sqrt-s with 1 instruction   */
    __m128d sum     = _mm_add_pd(a, sqrt_b);
    __m128d sum_lo  = sum;                            /* a1 + sqrt(b1) in the lower 64 bits                     */
    __m128d sum_hi  =  _mm_unpackhi_pd(sum, sum);     /* a2 + sqrt(b2) in the lower 64 bits                     */
    return _mm_comilt_sd(sum_lo, sum_hi);
}


int is_smaller(unsigned a1, unsigned b1, unsigned a2, unsigned b2) {
    return a1+sqrt(b1) < a2+sqrt(b2);
}


int main(){
    unsigned a1; unsigned b1; unsigned a2; unsigned b2;
    a1 = 11; b1 = 10; a2 = 10; b2 = 10;
    printf("smaller?  %i  %i \n",is_smaller(a1,b1,a2,b2), is_smaller_v5(a1,b1,a2,b2));
    a1 = 10; b1 = 11; a2 = 10; b2 = 10;
    printf("smaller?  %i  %i \n",is_smaller(a1,b1,a2,b2), is_smaller_v5(a1,b1,a2,b2));
    a1 = 10; b1 = 10; a2 = 11; b2 = 10;
    printf("smaller?  %i  %i \n",is_smaller(a1,b1,a2,b2), is_smaller_v5(a1,b1,a2,b2));
    a1 = 10; b1 = 10; a2 = 10; b2 = 11;
    printf("smaller?  %i  %i \n",is_smaller(a1,b1,a2,b2), is_smaller_v5(a1,b1,a2,b2));

    return 0;
}


See this Godbolt link for the generated assembly.

In a simple throughput test on Intel Skylake, with compiler options gcc -m64 -O3 -fno-math-errno -march=nehalem, I found a throughput of is_smaller_v5() which was 2.6 times better than the original is_smaller(): 6.8 cpu cycles vs 18 cpu cycles, with loop overhead included. However, in a (too?) simple latency test, where the inputs a1, a2, b1, b2 depended on the result of the previous is_smaller(_v5), I didn't see any improvement. (39.7 cycles vs 39 cycles).

  • clang already auto-vectorizes like that :P godbolt.org/z/GvNe2B see the double and signed int version. But only for double, not float. For throughput you should definitely use float with this strategy, because packed conversion is only 1 uop, and because sqrtps has better throughput. The OP's numbers are all 1million or less, so can be exactly represented by float, and so can their square roots. And BTW, looks like you forgot to set -mtune=haswell, so your gcc picked a store/reload strategy for _mm_set_epi32 instead of ALU movd. – Peter Cordes May 8 at 22:29
  • @PeterCordes: Single precision isn't accurate enough, see my comment here. We only know that the target is x86-64. Somehow clang doesn't vectorize in that case.Even with -march=nehalem. Clang produces better asm with 4 movds indeed. – wim May 8 at 22:39
  • 1
    @PeterCordes: Note that in a throughput test the auto vectorized function may easily bottleneck on port 5. Clang generates 9 p5 micro-ops (Skylake), if I counted right. – wim May 10 at 13:11
  • I didn't look that closely. Not surprised it wasn't optimal. :P Interesting, I hadn't realized there was an intrinsic for (u)comisd. Makes sense that there is, of course, but I'd never noticed it before. You should be able to save a movaps if you use movhlps into a "dead" variable instead of unpckhpd (if you compile without AVX). But that requires a bunch of casting because intrinsics make it inconvenient to help the compiler optimize its shuffles that way. – Peter Cordes May 10 at 13:19
  • @PeterCordes Actually, I have never used a (u)comisd intrinsic before, but here it seem useful. – wim May 10 at 13:30
1

Possibly not better than other answers, but uses a different idea (and a mass of pre-analysis).

// Compute approximate integer square root of input in the range [0,10^6].
// Uses a piecewise linear approximation to sqrt() with bounded error in each piece:
//   0 <= x <= 784 : x/28
//   784 < x <= 7056 : 21 + x/112
//   7056 < x <= 28224 : 56 + x/252
//   28224 < x <= 78400 : 105 + x/448
//   78400 < x <= 176400 : 168 + x/700
//   176400 < x <= 345744 : 245 + x/1008
//   345744 < x <= 614656 : 336 + x/1372
//   614656 < x <= 1000000 : (784000+x)/1784
// It is the case that sqrt(x) - 7.9992711366390365897... <= pseudosqrt(x) <= sqrt(x).
unsigned pseudosqrt(unsigned x) {
    return 
        x <= 78400 ? 
            x <= 7056 ?
                x <= 764 ? x/28 : 21 + x/112
              : x <= 28224 ? 56 + x/252 : 105 + x/448
          : x <= 345744 ?
                x <= 176400 ? 168 + x/700 : 245 + x/1008
              : x <= 614656 ? 336 + x/1372 : (x+784000)/1784 ;
}

// known pre-conditions: a1 < a2, 
//                  0 <= b1 <= 1000000
//                  0 <= b2 <= 1000000
bool is_smaller(unsigned a1, unsigned b1, unsigned a2, unsigned b2) {
// Try three refinements:
// 1: a1 + sqrt(b1) <= a1 + 1000, 
//    so is a1 + 1000 < a2 ?  
//    Convert to a2 - a1 > 1000 .
// 2: a1 + sqrt(b1) <= a1 + pseudosqrt(b1) + 8 and
//    a2 + pseudosqrt(b2) <= a2 + sqrt(b2), 
//    so is  a1 + pseudosqrt(b1) + 8 < a2 + pseudosqrt(b2) ?
//    Convert to a2 - a1 > pseudosqrt(b1) - pseudosqrt(b2) + 8 .
// 3: Actually do the work.
//    Convert to a2 - a1 > sqrt(b1) - sqrt(b2)
// Use short circuit evaluation to stop when resolved.
    unsigned ad = a2 - a1;
    return (ad > 1000)
           || (ad > pseudosqrt(b1) - pseudosqrt(b2) + 8)
           || ((int) ad > (int)(sqrt(b1) - sqrt(b2)));
}

(I don't have a compiler handy, so this probably contains a typo or two.)

  • It does compile with #include <math.h> (godbolt.org/z/VH4I3g), but I don't think it will do very well. @Geza's answer has a much faster integer early-out, and does less integer math than this (with less branching, too) to fully avoid sqrt by squaring while only requiring 64-bit integers. – Peter Cordes May 8 at 22:33
  • @PeterCordes : I don't have the means to do a timing comparison. Geza's early out handles 99.946% of uniformly distributed inputs and follows two long subtracts and a long long multiply, add, and compare. My early out is an unsigned subtract and compare. I don't see the basis of "much faster integer early-out". My early out handles 99.8% of uniformly distributed inputs. The pseudosqrt() case raises the handled set of inputs to 99.9725% costing additional 7 unsigned compares and one each of unsigned add and subtract. (continued) – Eric Towers May 8 at 23:09
  • @PeterCordes : Unless long long operations are as fast as unsigned operations now, your "much faster" claim would be surprising. THis seems to not be the case. [stackoverflow.com/questions/48779619/… – Eric Towers May 8 at 23:13
  • compare-and-branch is expensive unless branch prediction works perfectly. much more expensive than a long long multiply (3c latency, 1 cycle throughput on modern x86-64, like AMD Zen or Intel since Nehalem). Only division costs more for wider types on modern x86-64, other operations are not data-dependent or type-width dependent. A few older x86-64 CPUs like Bulldozer-family or Silvermont have slower 64-bit multiply. agner.org/optimize. (We're of course talking about scalar; auto-vectorizing with SIMD makes narrow types valuable because you can do more per vector) – Peter Cordes May 8 at 23:14
  • 1
    @wim: yeah, whatever the OP does, a fairly exhaustive unit test is in order! (1M ^4 is too expensive, though, so some pruning of the search space to look at some large values, and some values that make the two sides of the inequality nearly equal, is needed.) – Peter Cordes May 9 at 0:06

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