35

I want to write a class with more than 1 fields of different types but at any time, there is one and only one field of an instance object having non null value.

What I did so far does not look really clean.

class ExclusiveField {

    private BigInteger numericParam;
    private String stringParam;
    private LocalDateTime dateParam;

    public void setNumericParam(BigInteger numericParam) {
        unsetAll();
        this.numericParam = Objects.requireNonNull(numericParam);
    }

    public void setStringParam(String stringParam) {
        unsetAll();
        this.stringParam = Objects.requireNonNull(stringParam);
    }

    public void setDateParam(LocalDateTime dateParam) {
        unsetAll();
        this.dateParam = Objects.requireNonNull(dateParam);
    }

    private void unsetAll() {
        this.numericParam = null;
        this.stringParam = null;
        this.dateParam = null;
    }
}

Does Java support this pattern somehow or is there a more decent way to do it?

  • 12
    1. if you pass in a null value to any of those, all fields will be left as null, which is probably not intentional 2. do you need the object to be mutable? Providing 3 different constructors (or factory methods if you prefer) would make this quite a bit cleaner and guarantee that every ExclusiveField object that's accessible is always valid. – Joachim Sauer May 8 '19 at 9:02
  • 3
    @HieuHT but even so, it is better not to change the state when an exception occurs. This idea is called failure atomicity. – Andy Turner May 8 '19 at 10:01
  • 3
    This feels like a broken requirement. I'm very very curious about what this class actually does ... I would almost never expect a class to behave like this. What are you ultimately trying to accomplish? – svidgen May 8 '19 at 15:33
  • 2
    @HieuHT The field types aren't really that important, AFAIK. What are their names? Where does the data come from? How does it get used? What's their "business" value? What uses ExclusiveField? What do calls to ExclusiveField look like? Where do they come from? Etc... Rinse and repeat the same questions for the SP you're not allowed to change... The two top-voted answers below each sound reasonable to me -- depending on what this class is ultimately used for. – svidgen May 8 '19 at 21:11
  • 2
    My point is that you are conceptually partitioning non-null values into disjoint categories/subtypes/subclasses. I am not saying that such a partitioning criterion is necessarily per language primitive subtypes or per some subclassing that you already have. I am saying it may be a criterion that should be embodied by subclasses/inheritance in your code. The question is are you better served by a single pointer that will be of one of multiple subclasses, instead of your current design of a radio button for each category of object. – philipxy May 8 '19 at 21:20
30

The simplest approach for an object to have only one non-null field, is to actually have only one field and assume all others to be null implicitly. You only need another tag field, to determine which field is non-null.

Since in your example, all alternatives seem to be about the type of the value, the type itself could be the tag value, e.g.

class ExclusiveField {
    private Class<?> type;
    private Object value;

    private <T> void set(Class<T> t, T v) {
        value = Objects.requireNonNull(v);
        type = t;
    }
    private <T> T get(Class<T> t) {
        return type == t? t.cast(value): null;
    }

    public void setNumericParam(BigInteger numericParam) {
        set(BigInteger.class, numericParam);
    }

    public BigInteger getNumericParam() {
        return get(BigInteger.class);
    }

    public void setStringParam(String stringParam) {
        set(String.class, stringParam);
    }

    public String getStringParam() {
        return get(String.class);
    }

    public void setDateParam(LocalDateTime dateParam) {
        set(LocalDateTime.class, dateParam);
    }

    public LocalDateTime getDateParam() {
        return get(LocalDateTime.class);
    }
}

If the type is not the only differentiator, you need to define distinct key values. An enum would be a natural choice, but unfortunately, enum constants can not provide the type safety. So, the alternative would look like:

class ExclusiveField {
    private static final class Key<T> {
        static final Key<String>        STRING_PROPERTY_1 = new Key<>();
        static final Key<String>        STRING_PROPERTY_2 = new Key<>();
        static final Key<BigInteger>    BIGINT_PROPERTY   = new Key<>();
        static final Key<LocalDateTime> DATE_PROPERTY     = new Key<>();
    }
    private Key<?> type;
    private Object value;

    private <T> void set(Key<T> t, T v) {
        value = Objects.requireNonNull(v);
        type = t;
    }

    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked") // works if only set() and get() are used
    private <T> T get(Key<T> t) {
        return type == t? (T)value: null;
    }

    public void setNumericParam(BigInteger numericParam) {
        set(Key.BIGINT_PROPERTY, numericParam);
    }

    public BigInteger getNumericParam() {
        return get(Key.BIGINT_PROPERTY);
    }

    public void setString1Param(String stringParam) {
        set(Key.STRING_PROPERTY_1, stringParam);
    }

    public String getString1Param() {
        return get(Key.STRING_PROPERTY_1);
    }

    public void setString2Param(String stringParam) {
        set(Key.STRING_PROPERTY_2, stringParam);
    }

    public String getString2Param() {
        return get(Key.STRING_PROPERTY_2);
    }

    public void setDateParam(LocalDateTime dateParam) {
        set(Key.DATE_PROPERTY, dateParam);
    }

    public LocalDateTime getDateParam() {
        return get(Key.DATE_PROPERTY);
    }
}
  • 5
    that's the simplest approach? :| – Eugene May 8 '19 at 14:05
  • 2
    @Eugene well, yes. 1) It’s the logical conclusion from “I want to have at most one value” to “I have only one field that can hold a value” 2) it is technically impossible that the constraint is ever violated 3) each property method is a simple single liner, simpler than any of the shown alternatives. 4) when the OP says, the number of fields could become huge, this is the most memory efficient solution. – Holger May 8 '19 at 14:22
  • 4
    @Eugene and don’t forget, I’ve shown the complete class, unlike the other answers showing only a fragment of the actual solution. Actually, in my solution, the bookkeeping is less than in the other approaches. Just consider how much code has to be touched to add another property and how the solution looks like for ten, twenty, or thirty fields. – Holger May 8 '19 at 14:28
  • 1
    +1 I agree that a mutually-exclusive variable should be held in a single field. I probably would have used fewer methods to access it, using a generic type parameter. – John Wu May 8 '19 at 21:01
  • 1
    @JohnWu that’s what the (private in my example) get and set methods already do; the other methods are just for convenience; you could omit them if you prefer the generic methods as the API. – Holger May 9 '19 at 6:07
22

Change your unsetAll method to setAll:

private void setAll(BigInteger numericParam, String stringParam, LocalDateTime dateParam) {
    this.numericParam = numericParam;
    this.stringParam = stringParam;
    this.dateParam = dateParam;
}

Then invoke from your public setters like:

public void setNumericParam(BigInteger numericParam) {
    setAll(Objects.requireNonNull(numericParam), null, null);
}

Note that Objects.requireNonNull is evaluated before setAll, so if you were to pass in a null numericParam, this would fail without changing any internal state.

  • 1
    @dan1st your edit was not correct. OP is asking to enforce that at most (or perhaps exactly) one field is non-null. Your check would have ensured that at least one field is non-null. – Andy Turner May 8 '19 at 9:46
  • 1
    And I intentionally did not add any check because the code required to check that only one parameter of setAll is non-null is more complicated and error-prone than visual inspection that two of the params are null. – Andy Turner May 8 '19 at 9:49
  • This really doesn't scale well... Add a new field and you have to change every single method! In fact, I think that makes it less suitable than the original... – Mars May 9 '19 at 2:08
  • 1
    @Mars the required scale (in terms of either the number of fields in the class, or the number of such classes) is not stated in the question, beyond the example. For three fields, this is fine, and it is an improvement in terms of the failure atomicity. But sure, Holger's approach is probably better. – Andy Turner May 9 '19 at 7:33
7

preface: My answer is more theoretical, and the practices it describes aren't really practical in Java. They're simply not as well supported, and you would be "going against the grain", conventionally speaking. Regardless, I think it's a neat pattern to know about, and I thought I would share.

Java's classes are product types. When a class C contains members of types T1, T2, ..., Tn, then the valid values for objects of class C are the Cartesian product of the values of T1, T2, ..., Tn. For example, if class C contains a bool (which has 2 values) and byte (which has 256 values), then there are 512 possible values of C objects:

  • (false, -128)
  • (false, -127)
  • ...
  • (false, 0) ...
  • (false, 127)
  • (true, -128)
  • (true, -127)
  • ...
  • (true, 0) ...
  • (true, 127)

In your example, the theoretical possible values of ExclusiveField is equal to numberOfValuesOf(BigInteger.class) * numberOfValuesOf(String) * numberOfValuesOf(LocalDateTime) (notice the multiplication, that's why it's called a product type), but that's not really what you want. You're looking for ways to eliminate a huge set of these combinations so that the only values are when one field is non-null, and the others are null. There are numberOfValuesOf(BigInteger.class) + numberOfValuesOf(String) + numberOfValuesOf(LocalDateTime). Notice the addition, this indicates that what you're looking for is a "sum type".

Formally speaking, what you're looking for here is a tagged union (also called a variant, variant record, choice type, discriminated union, disjoint union, or sum type). A tagged union is a type whose values are a choice between one value of the members. In the previous example, if C was a sum type, there would be only 258 possible values: -128, -127, ..., 0, 127, true, false.

I recommend you check out unions in C, to build an understanding of how this works. The issue with C is that its unions had no way of "remembering" which "case" was active at any given point, which mostly defeats the whole purpose of a "sum type". To remedy this, you would add a "tag", which was an enum, whose value tells you what the state of the union is. "Union" stores the payload, and the "tag" tells you to the type of the payload, hence "tagged union".

The problem is, Java doesn't really have such a feature built in. Luckily, we can harness class hierarchies (or interfaces) to implement this. You essentially have to roll your own every time you need it, which is a pain because it takes a lot of boilerplate, but it's conceptually simple:

  • For n different cases, you make n different private classes, each storing the members pertinent to that case
  • You unify these private classes under a common base class (typically abstract) or interface
  • You wrap these classes in a forwarding class that exposes a public API all while hiding the private internals (to ensure that no one else can implement your interface).

Your interface could have n methods, each something like getXYZValue(). These methods could be made as default methods, where the default implementation returns null (for Object values, but doesn't work for primitives, Optional.empty() (for Optional<T> values), or throw an exception (gross, but there's no better way for primitive values like int). I don't like this approach, because the interface is rather disingenuous. Conforming types don't really conform to the interface, only ¹/n th of it.

Instead, you can use a pattern matching uhhh, pattern. You make a method (e.g. match) that takes n different Function parameters, whose types correspond to the types of cases of the discriminated union. To use a value of the discriminated union, you match it and provide n lambda expressions, each of which acts like the cases in a switch statement. When invoked, the dynamic dispatch system calls the match implementation associated with the particular storage object, which calls the correct one of the n functions and passes its value.

Here's an example:

import java.util.Optional;
import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.List;

import java.util.function.Function;
import java.util.function.Consumer;

import java.time.LocalDateTime;
import java.time.LocalDateTime;
import java.math.BigInteger;

class Untitled {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        List<ExclusiveField> exclusiveFields = Arrays.asList(
            ExclusiveField.withBigIntegerValue(BigInteger.ONE),
            ExclusiveField.withDateValue(LocalDateTime.now()),
            ExclusiveField.withStringValue("ABC")
        );

        for (ExclusiveField field : exclusiveFields) {
            field.consume(
                i -> System.out.println("Value was a BigInteger: " + i),
                d -> System.out.println("Value was a LocalDateTime: " + d),
                s -> System.out.println("Value was a String: " + s)
            );
        }
    }
}

class ExclusiveField {
    private ExclusiveFieldStorage storage;

    private ExclusiveField(ExclusiveFieldStorage storage) { this.storage = storage; }

    public static ExclusiveField withBigIntegerValue(BigInteger i) { return new ExclusiveField(new BigIntegerStorage(i)); }
    public static ExclusiveField withDateValue(LocalDateTime d) { return new ExclusiveField(new DateStorage(d)); }
    public static ExclusiveField withStringValue(String s) { return new ExclusiveField(new StringStorage(s)); }

    private <T> Function<T, Void> consumerToVoidReturningFunction(Consumer<T> consumer) {
        return arg -> { 
            consumer.accept(arg);
            return null;
        };
    }

    // This just consumes the value, without returning any results (such as for printing)
    public void consume(
        Consumer<BigInteger> bigIntegerMatcher,
        Consumer<LocalDateTime> dateMatcher,
        Consumer<String> stringMatcher
    ) {
        this.storage.match(
            consumerToVoidReturningFunction(bigIntegerMatcher),
            consumerToVoidReturningFunction(dateMatcher),
            consumerToVoidReturningFunction(stringMatcher)
        );
    }   

    // Transform 'this' according to one of the lambdas, resuling in an 'R'.
    public <R> R map(
        Function<BigInteger, R> bigIntegerMatcher,
        Function<LocalDateTime, R> dateMatcher,
        Function<String, R> stringMatcher
    ) {
        return this.storage.match(bigIntegerMatcher, dateMatcher, stringMatcher);
    }   

    private interface ExclusiveFieldStorage {
        public <R> R match(
            Function<BigInteger, R> bigIntegerMatcher,
            Function<LocalDateTime, R> dateMatcher,
            Function<String, R> stringMatcher
        );
    }

    private static class BigIntegerStorage implements ExclusiveFieldStorage {
        private BigInteger bigIntegerValue;

        BigIntegerStorage(BigInteger bigIntegerValue) { this.bigIntegerValue = bigIntegerValue; }

        public <R> R match(
            Function<BigInteger, R> bigIntegerMatcher,
            Function<LocalDateTime, R> dateMatcher,
            Function<String, R> stringMatcher
        ) {
            return bigIntegerMatcher.apply(this.bigIntegerValue);
        }
    }

    private static class DateStorage implements ExclusiveFieldStorage {
        private LocalDateTime dateValue;

        DateStorage(LocalDateTime dateValue) { this.dateValue = dateValue; }

        public <R> R match(
            Function<BigInteger, R> bigIntegerMatcher,
            Function<LocalDateTime, R> dateMatcher,
            Function<String, R> stringMatcher
        ) {
            return dateMatcher.apply(this.dateValue);
        }
    }

    private static class StringStorage implements ExclusiveFieldStorage {
        private String stringValue;

        StringStorage(String stringValue) { this.stringValue = stringValue; }

        public <R> R match(
            Function<BigInteger, R> bigIntegerMatcher,
            Function<LocalDateTime, R> dateMatcher,
            Function<String, R> stringMatcher
        ) {
            return stringMatcher.apply(this.stringValue);
        }
    }
}
  • You can replace the ExclusiveFieldStorage implementation classes with lambda expressions, however, this approach is limited to 256 cases, when you require a Function or Consumer for each of them to be specified as method parameter. And when you don’t offer mutation methods, there is no need for separating ExclusiveField and ExclusiveFieldStorage. – Holger May 8 '19 at 14:52
  • Woah, that's a cool idea (switching to lambdas). I'll play around with it when I get a chance – Alexander - Reinstate Monica May 9 '19 at 3:15
  • @Holger The reason I separated ExclusiveField and ExclusiveFieldStorage is because I want the interface to be private, so no one else can add new "cases" to this. – Alexander - Reinstate Monica May 9 '19 at 3:17
  • Well, the method signature determines which cases exist, as you can’t add new parameters. But yes, the separation may help enforcing the contract. Regarding lambda expressions, the biggest obstacle is that they can’t implement generic methods, so the best, I could come up with, was to make consume the functional method and map a default method, see ideone.com/gdw8ek – Holger May 9 '19 at 7:30
  • @Holger Actually, because I have this "passthrough" generic R, I can't replace the classes with lambdas (which aren't applicable to generic functions). I could use inner classes, but it's not much of an improvement. – Alexander - Reinstate Monica May 12 '19 at 5:44
3

Why not simply?

public void setNumericParam(BigInteger numericParam) { 
     this.numericParam = Objects.requireNonNull(numericParam); 
     this.stringParam = null; 
     this.dateParam = null; 
}
  • 3
    Yes but lots of code duplication. Imagine when the number of fields is huge – HieuHT May 8 '19 at 11:17
  • 2
    @HieuHT if it is huge and from your question, it is not. – Eugene May 8 '19 at 11:17
  • 1
    Yes, I should have added that to my question – HieuHT May 8 '19 at 11:52
3

Your goal

You mention in the comments that your goal is to write SQL requests for a legacy DB:

type:VARCHAR, numeric: INT, string: VARCHAR, date: DATETIME and ExclusiveField will be used as getQueryRunner().query("CALL sp_insert_parametter(?, ?, ?, ?, ?)", param.getNumericParam(), id, type, param.getStringParam(), param.getDateParam())

So your goal really isn't to create a class with only one non-null field.

Alternative

You could define an abstract class Field with id, type, value attributes:

public abstract class Field
{
    private int id;
    private Class<?> type;
    private Object value;

    public Field(int id, Object value) {
        this.id = id;
        this.type = value.getClass();
        this.value = value;
    }

    public abstract int getPosition();
}

For each column in your database, you create a small corresponding class, extending Field. Each class defines its desired type and its position in the SQL command:

import java.math.BigInteger;


public class BigIntegerField extends Field
{
    public BigIntegerField(int id, BigInteger numericParam) {
        super(id, numericParam);
    }

    @Override
    public int getPosition() {
        return 0;
    }
}

You can define Field#toSQL:

public String toSQL(int columnsCount) {
    List<String> rows = new ArrayList<>(Collections.nCopies(columnsCount, "NULL"));
    rows.set(getPosition(), String.valueOf(value));
    return String.format("SOME SQL COMMAND (%d, %s, %s)", id, type.getName(), String.join(", ", rows));
}

Which will output NULLS everywhere except at the desired position.

That's it.

Complete code

Field.java

package com.stackoverflow.legacy_field;

import java.math.BigInteger;
import java.time.LocalDateTime;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.List;


public abstract class Field
{
    private int id;
    private Class<?> type;
    private Object value;

    public Field(int id, Object value) {
        this.id = id;
        this.type = value.getClass();
        this.value = value;
    }

    public abstract int getPosition();

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        List<Field> fields = Arrays.asList(new BigIntegerField(3, BigInteger.TEN),
                new StringField(17, "FooBar"),
                new DateTimeField(21, LocalDateTime.now()));
        for (Field field : fields) {
            System.out.println(field.toSQL(3));
        }
    }

    public String toSQL(int columnsCount) {
        List<String> rows = new ArrayList<>(Collections.nCopies(columnsCount, "NULL"));
        rows.set(getPosition(), String.valueOf(value));
        return String.format("SOME SQL COMMAND (%d, %s, %s)", id, type.getName(), String.join(", ", rows));
    }
}

BigIntegerField.java

package com.stackoverflow.legacy_field;

import java.math.BigInteger;


public class BigIntegerField extends Field
{
    public BigIntegerField(int id, BigInteger numericParam) {
        super(id, numericParam);
    }

    @Override
    public int getPosition() {
        return 0;
    }
}

StringField.java

package com.stackoverflow.legacy_field;

public class StringField extends Field
{
    public StringField(int id, String stringParam) {
        super(id, stringParam);
    }

    @Override
    public int getPosition() {
        return 1;
    }
}

DateTimeField.java

package com.stackoverflow.legacy_field;

import java.time.LocalDateTime;

public class DateTimeField extends Field
{

    public DateTimeField(int id, LocalDateTime value) {
        super(id, value);
    }

    @Override
    public int getPosition() {
        return 2;
    }
}

Result

Launching Field#main outputs:

SOME SQL COMMAND (3, java.math.BigInteger, 10, NULL, NULL)
SOME SQL COMMAND (17, java.lang.String, NULL, FooBar, NULL)
SOME SQL COMMAND (21, java.time.LocalDateTime, NULL, NULL, 2019-05-09T09:39:56.062)

Which should be really close to your desired output. You could probably find better names and define specific toString() methods if needed.

2

You could use reflection. Two functions and you're done. Add a new field? No problem. You don't even have to change anything.

public void SetExclusiveValue(String param, Object val){
    this.UnsetAll();
    Class cls = this.getClass();
    Field fld = cls.getDeclaredField(param); //Maybe need to set accessibility temporarily? Or some other kind of check.
    //Also need to add check for fld existence!
    fld.set(this, Objects.requireNonNull(val));
}

private void UnsetAll(){
    Class cls = this.getClass();
    Field[] flds = cls.getDeclaredFields();
    for (Field fld : flds){
        fld.set(this,null);
    }
}

If accessibiility is an issue, you could simply add a list of accessible fields and check param against that

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