3

In my apparent naievety, I assumed that when one calls eval and specifies an environment (envir), the expression (expr) is evaluated in that environment.

However :-)

This works as expected:

xx <- 10
nn <- 20
exprs <- binom.test(x=xx,n=nn)
eval(exprs);

By default, eval evaluates in parent.frame(), which the help reveals is [t]he parent frame of a function evaluation is the environment in which the function was called.

So in the above example, this is the global environment, where indeed, xx and nn are defined. So far, so good.

newEnv <- new.env();
assign('xxx', 10, envir = newEnv);
assign('nnn', 30, envir = newEnv);
exprs2 <- expression(binom.test(x=xxx,n=nnn));
eval(exprs2, envir=newEnv);

This also works as expected; xxx and nnn are defined in the newEnv environment, and binom.test is evaluated in that environment.

Now we wrap this in a function (the one I'm trying to build - I'm building it using the pwr package, but for this example I'm using binom.test because it's base R and it still doesn't work :-)

loopFunction <- function(expr,
                         ...) {

  ### Get all 'dots' in a named list
  arguments <- list(...);
  argNames <- names(arguments);

  if (any(length(tail(arguments, -2) > 1))) {
    stop("Only the first two arguments may have length > 1!");
  }

  for (esIndex in seq_along(arguments[[1]])) {
    for (pwrIndex in seq_along(arguments[[2]])) {
      tempEnvironment <-
        new.env();
      assign(argNames[1], arguments[[1]][esIndex],
             envir = tempEnvironment);
      assign(argNames[2], arguments[[2]][pwrIndex],
             envir = tempEnvironment);
      if (length(arguments) > 2) {
        for (i in 3:length(arguments)) {
          assign(argNames[i], arguments[[i]],
                 envir = tempEnvironment);
        }
      }
      print(argNames);
      print(as.list(tempEnvironment));
      print(ls(tempEnvironment));
      print(get('x', envir=tempEnvironment));
      print(get('n', envir=tempEnvironment));
      return(eval(expr = expression(expr),
                  envir = tempEnvironment)$estimate);
    }
  }
}

When running this, you get:

loopFunction(binom.test(x=x,n=n), x=c(10,20), n=c(30, 100));

#> [1] "x" "n"
#> $x
#> [1] 10
#> 
#> $n
#> [1] 30
#> 
#> [1] "n" "x"
#> [1] 10
#> [1] 30
#> Error in binom.test(x = x, n = n): object 'x' not found

So, that error stumps me. clearly, x and n exist in tempEnvironment; and tempEnvironment is passed to eval.

Why does this suddenly no longer work? Does this work differently inside functions? Am I missing something obvious?

  • You may want to look into ?environment. – jay.sf May 8 at 10:19
  • 😬 Any specific part of that page? I did study that, but can't find (or derive) why eval(expr = expression(expr), envir = tempEnvironment)$estimate; should fail in the above example? – Matherion May 8 at 12:02
  • I know this doesn't answer your question directly, but have you tried to run loopFunction("binom.test(x, n)", x=10, n=30) with eval(expr=parse(text=expr), envir =tempEnvironment)$estimate) replacing the last part of your code? Also, data.frame[esIndex, pwrIndex] isn't a valid piece of code. – JdeMello May 10 at 3:42
  • Yeah, sorry, the data.frame was a sloppy edit while making the original code self-contained and more generic. I'll fix the question. Thanks for pointing this out! The 'real' code that we'll use is at gitlab.com/openuniversity/study-planning-sample-size/snippets/…, in case anybody's interested! – Matherion May 12 at 15:23
2

I am not sure why expression() doesn't work in this context. However, it works if you write expr as a string and replace expression(expr) by parse(text=expr):

loopFunction <- function(expr,
                         ...) {

  ### Get all 'dots' in a named list
  arguments <- list(...);
  argNames <- names(arguments);

  if (any(length(tail(arguments, -2) > 1))) {
    stop("Only the first two arguments may have length > 1!");
  }

  for (esIndex in seq_along(arguments[[1]])) {
    for (pwrIndex in seq_along(arguments[[2]])) {
      tempEnvironment <-
        new.env();
      assign(argNames[1], arguments[[1]][esIndex],
             envir = tempEnvironment);
      assign(argNames[2], arguments[[2]][pwrIndex],
             envir = tempEnvironment);
      if (length(arguments) > 2) {
        for (i in 3:length(arguments)) {
          assign(argNames[i], arguments[[i]],
                 envir = tempEnvironment);
        }
      }
      print(argNames);
      print(as.list(tempEnvironment));
      print(ls(tempEnvironment));
      print(get('x', envir=tempEnvironment));
      print(get('n', envir=tempEnvironment));
      return(eval(expr=parse(text=expr), envir =tempEnvironment)$estimate)
    }
  }
}

loopFunction("binom.test(x, n)", x=10, n=30)

Result:

> loopFunction("binom.test(x, n)", x=10, n=30)
[1] "x" "n"
$`x`
[1] 10

$n
[1] 30

[1] "n" "x"
[1] 10
[1] 30
probability of success 
             0.3333333 
  • 1
    That's it, excellent! And by replacing expr = expression(expr) in the original function with parse(text=substitute(deparse(expr))), the expression can be passed as expression (i.e. not as a string). Still, this behavior seems to be at odds with R's normal 'lazy evalution'. Maybe promises also encapsulate their original environment? So they are evaluated later, but not in the environment where that evaluation is prompted? In any case, thank you very much, this solves it!!! – Matherion May 12 at 15:20
  • I have no idea why your original code did not work to be honest. If you find out why, let us know with an update. Thanks – JdeMello May 14 at 14:54
  • I will. I'm equally perplexed. Must be some logical reason somewhere; perhaps @jay.sf knows it, but if not; if I find out, I'll share it here! – Matherion May 25 at 19:26

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