5

I would like to do something when finditer() does not find anything.

import re
pattern = "1"
string = "abc"  
matched_iter = re.finditer(pattern, string)
# <if matched_iter is empty (no matched found>.
#   do something.
# else
    for m in matched_iter:
        print m.group()

The best thing I could come up with is to keep track of found manually:

mi_no_find = re.finditer(r'\w+',"$$%%%%")   # not matching.
found = False
for m in mi_no_find:
    print m.group()
    found = True
if not found:
    print "Nothing found"

Related posts that don't answer:

[edit]
- I have no interest in enumerating or counting total output. Only if found else not found actions.
- I understand I can put finditer into a list, but this would be inefficient for large strings. One objective is to have low memory utilization.

3
  • If it is an iterator, you must iterate over it to know that it is empty. Unless the regex library adds a flourish, you'd end up having to do something like this, and this is reasonable enough to me May 8, 2019 at 23:19
  • Try ideone.com/pnI5nq. Turn the iterable value into a list and you may easily use it for any further manipulations. Another way: if if re.search(pattern, s): then there is a match. See ideone.com/tw5jmf May 8, 2019 at 23:21
  • Just turn it into a list: list(re.finditer(pattern, string)) If you don't have a ton of matches you won't notice a difference in performance
    – berardig
    May 8, 2019 at 23:22

5 Answers 5

5

Updated 04/10/2020

Use re.search(pattern, string) to check if a pattern exists.

pattern = "1"
string = "abc"

if re.search(pattern, string) is None:
    print('do this because nothing was found')

Returns:

do this because nothing was found

If you want to iterate over the return, then place the re.finditer() within the re.search().

pattern = '[A-Za-z]'
string = "abc"

if re.search(pattern, string) is not None:
    for thing in re.finditer(pattern, string):
        print('Found this thing: ' + thing[0])

Returns:

Found this thing: a
Found this thing: b
Found this thing: c

Therefore, if you wanted both options, use the else: clause with the if re.search() conditional.

pattern = "1"
string = "abc"

if re.search(pattern, string) is not None:
    for thing in re.finditer(pattern, string):
        print('Found this thing: ' + thing[0])
else:
    print('do this because nothing was found')

Returns:

do this because nothing was found

previous reply below (not sufficient, just read above)

If the .finditer() does not match a pattern, then it will not perform any commands within the related loop.

So:

  • Set the variable before the loop you are using to iterate over the regex returns
  • Call the variable after (And outside of) the loop you are using to iterate over the regex returns

This way, if nothing is returned from the regex call, the loop won't execute and your variable call after the loop will return the exact same variable it was set to.

Below, example 1 demonstrates the regex finding the pattern. Example 2 shows the regex not finding the pattern, so the variable within the loop is never set. Example 3 shows my suggestion - where the variable is set before the regex loop, so if the regex does not find a match (and subsequently, does not trigger the loop), the variable call after the loop returns the initial variable set (Confirming the regex pattern was not found).

Remember to import the import re module.

EXAMPLE 1 (Searching for the characters 'he' in the string 'hello world' will return 'he')

my_string = 'hello world'
pat = '(he)'
regex = re.finditer(pat,my_string)

for a in regex:
    b = str(a.groups()[0])
print(b)

# returns 'he'

EXAMPLE 2 (Searching for the characters 'ab' in the string 'hello world' do not match anything, so the 'for a in regex:' loop does not execute and does not assign the b variable any value.)

my_string = 'hello world'
pat = '(ab)'
regex = re.finditer(pat,my_string)

for a in regex:
    b = str(a.groups()[0])
print(b)

# no return

EXAMPLE 3 (Searching for the characters 'ab' again, but this time setting the variable b to 'CAKE' before the loop, and calling the variable b after, outside of the loop returns the initial variable - i.e. 'CAKE' - since the loop did not execute).

my_string = 'hello world'
pat = '(ab)'
regex = re.finditer(pat,my_string)

b = 'CAKE' # sets the variable prior to the for loop
for a in regex:
    b = str(a.groups()[0])
print(b) # calls the variable after (and outside) the loop

# returns 'CAKE'

It's also worth noting that when designing your pattern to feed into the regex, make sure to use the parenthesis to indicate the start and end of a group.

pattern = '(ab)' # use this
pattern = 'ab' # avoid using this

To tie back to the initial question:

Since nothing found won’t execute the for loop (for a in regex), the user can preload the variable, then check it after the for loop for the original loaded value. This will allow for the user to know if nothing was found.

my_string = 'hello world'
pat = '(ab)'
regex = re.finditer(pat,my_string)

b = 'CAKE' # sets the variable prior to the for loop
for a in regex:
    b = str(a.groups()[0])
if b == ‘CAKE’:
    # action taken if nothing is returned
4
  • 1
    I think this kinda misses the point. The question was how to do the 'if nothing found' case. Feb 15, 2020 at 23:17
  • @Leo Ufimtsev That’s fair. When .finditer() finds nothing, it bypasses the subsequent conditional code within the for loop (since there is no, ‘for a in...). When the user preloads the variable, it is never replaced during the ‘for loop.’ So afrer the loop the user can check the variable for the preloaded value to test if nothing happened. I need to supplement my answer! Feb 17, 2020 at 2:15
  • @LeoUfimtsev Check out my update using re.search() and either 'is None' or 'is not None' to build a better suggestion. Let me know if this helps! Apr 10, 2020 at 6:40
  • 1
    I admire your persistence. I think this should be rewarded. This is indeed a good solution. marked as accepted answer. Thx for your input. Apr 10, 2020 at 15:42
4

If performance isn't an issue, simply use findall or list(finditer(...)), which returns a list.

Otherwise, you can "peek" into the generator with next, then loop as normal if it raises StopIteration. Though there are other ways to do it, this is the simplest to me:

import itertools
import re

pattern = "1"
string = "abc"  
matched_iter = re.finditer(pattern, string)

try:
    first_match = next(matched_iter)
except StopIteration:
    print("No match!") # action for no match
else:
    for m in itertools.chain([first_match], matched_iter):
        print(m.group())
3

You can probe the iterator with next and then chain the results back together while excepting StopIteration which means the iterator was empty:

import itertools as it

matches = iter([])
try:
    probe = next(matches)
except StopIteration:
    print('empty')
else:
    for m in it.chain([probe], matches):
        print(m)

Regarding your solution you could check m directly, setting it to None beforehand:

matches = iter([])
m = None
for m in matches:
    print(m)
if m is None:
    print('empty')
2
  • 1
    It would be safer to put only the next call in the try, and have the rest of the happy path in an else. May 8, 2019 at 23:32
  • I like the m = None hack. It's simple enough that I can remember that during an interview. The try/catch kinda looks complicated to understand at first glance. May 9, 2019 at 0:02
0

It prints the original string if there are no matches in the string. It will replace the position n of the string.

For more reference: https://docs.python.org/2/howto/regex.html



Input_Str = "FOOTBALL"

def replacing(Input_String, char_2_replace, replaced_char, n):
    pattern = re.compile(char_2_replace)
    if len(re.findall(pattern, Input_String)) >= n: 
        where = [m for m in pattern.finditer(Input_String)][n-1]
        before = Input_String[:where.start()]
        after = Input_String[where.end():]
        newString = before + replaced_char + after
    else: 
        newString = Input_String
    return newString

print(replacing(Input_Str, 'L', 'X', 4))```
0

I know this answer is late, but very suitable for Python 3.8+

You can use the new warlus operator := operator along with next(iterator[, default]) to solve for 'no matches' in re.finditer(pattern, string, flags=0) somewhat like this:

import re

pattern_ = "1"
string_ = "abc" 

def is_match():
    was_found = False
    while next((match := re.finditer(pattern_, string_)), None) is not None:
        was_found = True
        yield match.group()  # or just print it
    return was_found

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