-1

Write a function that counts the number of elements in a rosetree.

I tried counts the number of elements in a rosetree.

data RoseTree a = RoseNode a [RoseTree a]
    deriving Show
things :: RoseTree String
things = 
    RoseNode "thing" [
        RoseNode "animal" [
            RoseNode "cat" [], RoseNode "dog" []
        ],

        RoseNode "metal" [
            RoseNode "alloy" [
                RoseNode "steel" [], RoseNode "bronze" []
            ],
            RoseNode "element" [
                RoseNode "gold" [], RoseNode "tin" [], RoseNode "iron" []
            ]
        ],

        RoseNode "fruit" [
            RoseNode "apple" [
                RoseNode "Granny Smith" [], RoseNode "Pink Lady" []
            ],
            RoseNode "banana" [],
            RoseNode "orange" []
        ],

        RoseNode "astronomical object" [
            RoseNode "Planet" [
                RoseNode "Earth" [], RoseNode "Mars" []
            ],
            RoseNode "Star" [
                RoseNode "The Sun" [], RoseNode "Sirius" []
            ],
            RoseNode "Galaxy" [
                RoseNode "Milky Way" []
            ]
        ]
    ] 

It should be 27, however, it returns 4.

EDIT: Here is my attempt:

roseSize x = case x of
    RoseNode a [] -> 0
    RoseNode a (x:xs) -> 1 + roseSize (RoseNode a xs)
  • I tried counts the number of elements in a rosetree. roseSize x = case x of RoseNode a [] -> 0 RoseNode a (x:xs)->1 + roseSize (RoseNode a xs) – Kafai Law May 9 '19 at 13:01
  • 1
    Where is your function? This is only a data type and a tree. Also, have you looked at Haskell's Data.Tree from the package containers? It is a rose tree. – Simon Shine May 9 '19 at 13:09
  • 1
    @SimonShine An attempt was presented in the comments - I just edited it into the question. – bradrn May 9 '19 at 13:10
6

It should be 27, however, it returns 4.

roseSize x = case x of
  RoseNode a [] -> 0
  RoseNode a (x:xs) -> 1 + roseSize (RoseNode a xs)

So you're not counting the sub-trees recursively. Try instead (fixed: base case to 1),

roseSize (RoseNode _ []) = 1
roseSize (RoseNode a (t:ts)) = roseSize t + roseSize (RoseNode a ts)

The missing part is roseSize t.

Otherwise you're only making recursive calls for the first layer of the tree.

If you evaluate your function by hand this becomes apparent,

roseSize things
  ~> roseSize (RoseNode "thing" [ animals, metals, fruits, astronomical_objects ]
  ~> 1 + roseSize (RoseNode "thing" [ metals, fruits, astronomical_objects ])
  ~> 1 + 1 + roseSize (RoseNode "thing" [ fruits, astronomical_objects ])
  ~> 1 + 1 + 1 + roseSize (RoseNode "thing" [ astronomical_objects ])
  ~> 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 + roseSize (RoseNode "thing" [])
  ~> 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 + 0

whereas with roseSize t in the function body the evaluation becomes

roseSize things
  ~> roseSize (RoseNode "thing" [ animals, metals, fruits, astronomical_objects ]
  ~> roseSize animals
      + roseSize (RoseNode "thing" [ metals, fruits, astronomical_objects ])
  ~> roseSize (RoseNode "animal" [ cat, dog ])
      + roseSize (RoseNode "thing" [ metals, fruits, astronomical_objects ])
  ~> roseSize cat
      + roseSize (RoseNode "animal" [ dog ])
      + roseSize (RoseNode "thing" [ metals, fruits, astronomical_objects ])
  ~> 1 -- given the base case of 1 instead of 0
      + roseSize (RoseNode "animal" [ dog ])
      + roseSize (RoseNode "thing" [ metals, fruits, astronomical_objects ])
  ~> ...

As an exercise, making this function explicitly recursive is fine.

But you may want to consider a more general approach, either using higher-order functions like PF. Castro does it, or an existing data structure like Data.Tree of containers:

import qualified Data.Tree as T
import           Data.Tree (Tree(..))

things :: Tree String
things = Node "thing" [ animals, metals, fruits, astronomical_objects ]
  where
    animals = Node "animal" (map pure [ "cat", "dog" ])
    metals = Node "metal" [ alloys, elements ]
    alloys = Node "alloy" (map pure [ "steel", "bronze" ])
    elements = Node "element" (map pure [ "gold", "tin", "iron" ])
    fruits = ...
    astronomical_objects = ...

Since a Data.Tree is Foldable, you can use length on it.

So it's not necessary to define a custom roseSize function.


At this point you're counting the nodes in a tree, and not the leaves of a tree, with leaves being the actual objects rather than the categories to which they belong. So you may actually be interested in counting the leaves.

You could do that by creating a function that finds the leaves:

leaves :: Tree a -> [a]
leaves (Node x []) = ... -- x is a leaf
leaves (Node _x ts) = ... -- _x isn't a leaf

With this template you can't easily use explicit recursion, i.e. matching on Node x (t:ts) and calling leaves on ts, since then the non-leaf case eventually ends in the base case, making the exhausted category appear as a leaf. But you can use higher-order functions to abstract out the recursion, e.g. concat, map, or concatMap of Prelude.


Using a library rose tree gives you other advantages, too, for example a bunch of other type class instances (Applicative giving you pure "foo" to construct a singleton tree / leaf) and a pretty-printing function:

> putStrLn $ T.drawTree things
thing
|
+- animal
|  |
|  +- cat
|  |
|  `- dog
|
`- metal
   |
   +- alloy
   |  |
   |  +- steel
   |  |
   |  `- bronze
   |
   ...
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  • 2
    I don't like this recursion, since roseSize (RoseNode a [t1,t2,t3]) evaluates to 1 + roseSize t1 + 1 + roseSize t2 + 1 + roseSize t3 which looks wrong. Maybe it's correct after all, but I can't convince myself. Those extra 1s look redundant. – chi May 9 '19 at 13:21
  • 2
    I think actually it's because it should be roseSize (RoseNode _ []) = 1. I think this would also remove the 1+ from the second case, solving @chi's query as well. – bradrn May 9 '19 at 13:22
  • 1
    I assume the intent is to count the number of nodes, so if nothing else the base case is wrong: RoseNode _ [] should result in 1, not 0. – Robin Zigmond May 9 '19 at 13:22
  • 1
    Also, if the base case is 1, then the 1 + should be removed as well from the second case. I mentioned this already but I feel it's important enough to say again. – bradrn May 9 '19 at 13:24
  • 2
    The base case must be 1: this definition does not allow for an empty tree, so roseSize should never return 0. A node, however, could have no children, meaning the sum could evaluate to 0. – chepner May 9 '19 at 13:42
4

You should use map and fold with RoseTrees, e.g.:

size (RoseNode x xs) = 1 + (sum (map size xs))

where sum is just:

sum = foldl (+) 0
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