4

I have a list of dictionaries, but some of them are duplicates and I want to remove them (the duplicates).

The keys of the dict are a sequential number.

An example is the following:

[{1: {a:[1,2,3], b: 4}},
{2: {a:[4,5,6], d: 5}},
{3: {a:[1,2,3], b: 4}},
.....,
{1000: {a:[2,5,1], b: 99}},
]

Considering the previous example I would like to obtain:

[{1: {a:[1,2,3], b: 4}},
{2: {a:[4,5,6], d: 5}},
.....,
{1000: {a:[2,5,1], b: 99}},
]

In fact the dictionaries with keys 1 and 3 are identically in their values.

I tried with a set, but since dict is a not hashable type I am not able to do so.

How can i fix the problem?

EDIT

In my case the number of items inside the dict is not fix, so I can have:

[{1: {a:[1,2,3], b: 4}},
{2: {a:[4,5,6], d: 5}},
.....,
{1000: {a:[2,5,1], b: 99, c:["a","v"]}},
]

where the dict with keys 100 has three elements inside insted of two as the other shown.

  • One way would be to recursively convert each dict to an immutable equivalent, e.g. convert lists to tuples, sets to frozensets, and dicts to sorted tuples of key-value pairs. – meowgoesthedog May 9 at 15:54
  • You should use sorted(d.items()) or whatever is your criterion of equality when adding to the set. – a_guest May 9 at 15:56
  • 1
    @meowgoesthedog But converting mutable types to their immutable equivalents would mean that there would be no way to distinguish the two, so [1, 2] would be considered a duplicate to (1, 2), which may not be desirable. – blhsing May 9 at 16:18
  • 1
    @blhsing sorry I realised what you meant afterwards, yes you are right. Tagging the objects with their original types could work as a resolution, although it would further complicate things. – meowgoesthedog May 9 at 16:22
4

To get around the limitation of @jdehesa's solution, where [1, 2] would be treated as a duplicate as (1, 2), you can preserve the data types by using pprint.pformat instead to serialize the data structure. Since pprint.pformat sorts dicts by keys and sets by items, {1: 2, 3: 4} would be properly considered the same as {3: 4, 1: 2}, but [1, 2] would not be considered a duplicate to (1, 2):

from pprint import pformat
lst = [
    {1: {'a': [1, 2, 3], 'b': 4}},
    {2: {'a': [4, 5, 6], 'd': 5}},
    {3: {'b': 4, 'a': [1, 2, 3]}},
    {4: {'a': (4, 5, 6), 'd': 5}},
]
seen = set()
output = []
for d in lst:
    for k, v in d.items():
        signature = pformat(v)
        if signature not in seen:
            seen.add(signature)
            output.append({k: v})

output becomes:

[{1: {'a': [1, 2, 3], 'b': 4}},
 {2: {'a': [4, 5, 6], 'd': 5}},
 {4: {'a': (4, 5, 6), 'd': 5}}]
  • Using signature = pformat(v, indent=0, width=int(1e9), compact=True) is going to give better performance especially for deep and long objects. Also this solution is likely to face issues with custom types since pformat just uses the object's __repr__ in that case (that might lead to false duplicates as well as omissions depending on whether the type implements that method or not). If you're only dealing with built-in types however, it's a decent solution. – a_guest May 9 at 18:45
3

You can maybe use a function like this to turn your objects into something hashable:

def make_hashable(o):
    if isinstance(o, dict):
        return frozenset((k, make_hashable(v)) for k, v in o.items())
    elif isinstance(o, list):
        return tuple(make_hashable(elem) for elem in o)
    elif isinstance(o, set):
        return frozenset(make_hashable(elem) for elem in o)
    else:
        return o

Then you keep a set of seen objects and keep only the keys of each dictionary containing objects that you did not see before:

lst = [
    {1: {'a':[1,2,3], 'b': 4}},
    {2: {'a':[4,5,6], 'd': 5}},
    {3: {'a':[1,2,3], 'b': 4}},
]

seen = set()
result_keys = []
for elem in lst:
    keep_keys = []
    for k, v in elem.items():
        v_hashable = make_hashable(v)
        if v_hashable not in seen:
            seen.add(v_hashable)
            keep_keys.append(k)
    result_keys.append(keep_keys)
result = [{k: elem[k] for k in keys} for elem, keys in zip(lst, result_keys) if keys]
print(result)
# [{1: {'a': [1, 2, 3], 'b': 4}}, {2: {'a': [4, 5, 6], 'd': 5}}]

Note that, as blhsing notes in the comments, this has some limitations, such as considering (1, 2) and [1, 2] equals, as well as {1: 2} and {(1, 2)}. Also, some types may not be convertible to an equivalent hashable type.

EDIT: As a_guest suggests, you can work around the type ambiguity by returning the type itself along with the hashable object in make_hashable:

def make_hashable(o):
    t = type(o)
    if isinstance(o, dict):
        o = frozenset((k, make_hashable(v)) for k, v in o.items())
    elif isinstance(o, list):
        o = tuple(make_hashable(elem) for elem in o)
    elif isinstance(o, set):
        o = frozenset(make_hashable(elem) for elem in o)
    return t, o

If you don't need to look into the hashable object, this will easily provide strict type comparison. Note in this case even things like {1, 2} and frozenset({1, 2}) will be different.

  • 1
    In make_hashable you can return tuples type(o), ... in order to avoid that type ambiguity. – a_guest May 9 at 16:36
  • 1
    @a_guest Thanks, you're right, that's a good workaround, I added it in the answer. – jdehesa May 9 at 17:08
  • I edit the question since the number of item inside each dict is not fixed, so the loop that assumes that the number of items inside each dict is two will not work properly. – AndreaM May 10 at 9:53
  • @AndreaM In the code I posted I don't assume any particular dictionary structure (in fact it would work even if each dictionary contained more than one key). Is this not working for you as it is now? – jdehesa May 10 at 9:57
  • When you use for k, v in elem.items(): aren't you assuming that the number of items inside the dict are two? If I try with dict of different size it doesn't return the right result (it seems to split the keys inside the nested dictionaries, as a or b) – AndreaM May 10 at 10:04
1

You can define a custom hash of your dictionaries by subclassing dict:

class MyData(dict):

    def __hash__(self):
        return hash((k, repr(v)) for k, v in self.items())

l = [
    {1: {'a': [1, 2, 3], 'b': 4}},
    {2: {'a': [4, 5, 6], 'd': 5}},
    {3: {'b': 4, 'a': [1, 2, 3]}},
    {4: {'a': (4, 5, 6), 'd': 5}},
]

s = set([MyData(*d.values()) for d in l])

This is assuming that all the dictionaries in the list have only one key-value pair.

  • 1
    Assuming hes perfectly aware of all the keys at all times though! – William Bright May 9 at 18:18
  • Unfortunately it is not my case. I edit the question to point out this problem. I don't know previously the keys of the dict, and it could be very very long, so I would like to avoid a solution where I have to manually code all the possible keys (that I may know) – AndreaM May 10 at 10:10
  • I've updated to reflect this. – Jacques Gaudin May 10 at 11:22
0

This is the simplest solution I've been able to come up with assuming the nested dictionary like

{1: {'a': [1,2,3,5,79], 'b': 234 ...}}

as long as the only container inside the dictionary is a list like {'a': [1,2,3..]} then this will work. Or you can just add a simple check like the function below will show.


def serialize(dct):  # this is the sub {'a': [1,2,3]} dictionary
    tmp = []
    for value in dct.values():
        if type(value) == list:
            tmp.append(tuple(value))
        else:
            tmp.append(value)
    return tuple(tmp)

def clean_up(lst):
    seen = set()
    clean = []
    for dct in lst:
        # grabs the 1..1000 key inside the primary dictionary
        # assuming there is only 1 key being the "id" or the counter etc...
        key = list(dct.keys())[0] 
        serialized = serialize(dct[key])
        if serialized not in seen:
            seen.add(serialized)
            clean.append(dct)
    return clean

So the function serialize grabs the nested dictionary and creates a simple tuple from the contents. This is then checked if its in the set "seen" to verify its unique.

benchmarks

generate a data set using some random values just because

lst = []
for i in range(1,1000):
    dct = {
        i: {
            random.choice(string.ascii_letters): [n for n in range(random.randint(0,i))], 
            random.choice(string.ascii_letters): random.randint(0,i)
        }
    }
    lst.append(dct)

Running the benchmarks:


%timeit clean_up(lst)
3.25 ms ± 17.1 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100 loops each)

%timeit jdhesa(lst)
126 ms ± 606 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

As seen the function clean_up is significantly faster but simpler (not necessarily a good thing) in its implementation checks.

0

I don't know how big is your list and how many duplicates are in it, but, just in case, here is the basic solution.
It might be not efficient, but you don't have to worry about elements type:

import datetime as dt

data = [
    {1: {"b": 4, "a":[1,2,3]}},
    {2: {"a":[4,5,6], "d": 5}},
    {3: {"a":[1,2,3], "b": 4}},
    {4: {'a': dt.datetime(2019, 5, 10), 'd': set([4])}},
    {5: {'a': dt.datetime(2019, 5, 10), 'd': set([4])}},
    {6: {"a":[2,5,1], "b": 99}},
    {7: {"a":[5,2,1], "b": 99}},
    {8: {"a":(5,2,1), "b": 99}}
]



seen = []
output = []
for d in data:
    for k, v in d.items():
        if v not in seen:
            seen.append(v)
            output.append({k:v})

>>> print(output)
[{1: {'a': [1, 2, 3], 'b': 4}},
 {2: {'a': [4, 5, 6], 'd': 5}},
 {4: {'a': datetime.datetime(2019, 5, 10, 0, 0), 'd': {4}}},
 {6: {'a': [2, 5, 1], 'b': 99}},
 {7: {'a': [5, 2, 1], 'b': 99}},
 {8: {'a': (5, 2, 1), 'b': 99}}]

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