6
  • When my service starts up, I want to construct a simple pipeline.
  • I'd like to isolate the Flux sink, or a Processor, to emit events with.
  • Events will be coming in from multiple threads and should be processed according to the pipeline's subscribeOn() specification, but everything seems to run on the main thread.
  • What is the best approach? I've attached my attempts below.
  • (I'm using reactor-core v3.2.8.RELEASE.)
import org.junit.jupiter.api.Test;

import reactor.core.publisher.DirectProcessor;
import reactor.core.publisher.Flux;
import reactor.core.publisher.FluxProcessor;
import reactor.core.publisher.FluxSink;
import reactor.core.scheduler.Schedulers;

/**
 * I want to construct my React pipelines during creation,
 * then emit events over the lifetime of my services.
 */
public class React1Test
{
    /**
     * Attempt 1 - use a DirectProcessor and send items to it.
     * Doesn't work though - seems to always run on the main thread.
     */
    @Test
    public void testReact1() throws InterruptedException
    {
        // Create the flux and sink.
        FluxProcessor<String, String> fluxProcessor = DirectProcessor.<String>create().serialize();
        FluxSink<String> sink = fluxProcessor.sink();

        // Create the pipeline.
        fluxProcessor
            .doOnNext(str -> showDebugMsg(str))   // What thread do ops work on?
            .subscribeOn(Schedulers.elastic())
            .subscribe(str -> showDebugMsg(str)); // What thread does subscribe run on?

        // Give the multi-thread pipeline a second.
        Thread.sleep(1000);

        // Time passes ... things happen ...
        // Pass a few messages to the sink, emulating events.
        sink.next("a");
        sink.next("b");
        sink.next("c");

        // It's multi-thread so wait a sec to receive.
        Thread.sleep(1000);
    }

    // Used down below during Flux.create().
    private FluxSink<String> sink2;

    /**
     * Attempt 2 - use Flux.create() and its FluxSink object.
     * Also seems to always run on the main thread.
     */
    @Test
    public void testReact2() throws InterruptedException
    {
        // Create the flux and sink.
        Flux.<String>create(sink -> sink2 = sink)
            .doOnNext(str -> showDebugMsg(str))   // What thread do ops work on?
            .subscribeOn(Schedulers.elastic())
            .subscribe(str -> showDebugMsg(str)); // What thread does subscribe run on?

        // Give the multi-thread pipeline a second.
        Thread.sleep(1000);

        // Pass a few messages to the sink.
        sink2.next("a");
        sink2.next("b");
        sink2.next("c");

        // It's multi-thread so wait a sec to receive.
        Thread.sleep(1000);
    }

    // Show us what thread we're on.
    private static void showDebugMsg(String msg)
    {
        System.out.println(String.format("%s [%s]", msg, Thread.currentThread().getName()));
    }
}

Output is always:

a [main]
a [main]
b [main]
b [main]
c [main]
c [main]

But what I would expect, is:

a [elastic-1]
a [elastic-1]
b [elastic-2]
b [elastic-2]
c [elastic-3]
c [elastic-3]

Thanks in advance.

2 Answers 2

2

You see [main] because you're calling onNext from the main thread. subscribeOn you're using is only for the subscription (when create's lambda is triggered). You will see elastic-* threads logged if you use publishOn instead of subscribeOn.

Also, consider using Processors, storing sink obtained from Flux.create and similar operators as a field is discouraged.

9
  • Shouldn't at least the subscribe() lambda run on the subscribeOn() Scheduler? And even when I do add publishOn(), it publishes every item on the same thread, e.g., elastic-1. Also the testReact1() method is using a Processor. Thanks.
    – Luke
    May 9, 2019 at 17:29
  • it should and will, but you are not logging anything in create.
    – bsideup
    May 10, 2019 at 6:39
  • "the same thread" you observe is expected due to queue draining. Why would it spread if everything can de done on one thread?
    – bsideup
    May 10, 2019 at 6:39
  • Can you provide a reference to confirm "Also, consider using Processors, storing sink as a field is discouraged." ? IIUC, projectreactor.io/docs/core/release/reference says the opposite: " Do I Need a Processor? Could a “generator” operator work instead? (Generally, these operators are made to bridge APIs that are not reactive, providing a “sink” that is similar in concept to a Processor, in the sense that it lets you manually populate the sequence with data or terminate it).". So using Flux.create( sink -> /*store the sink*/ ).publish().connect() is the recommended approach ?
    – jonenst
    Jun 4, 2020 at 9:24
  • the link you provided is pretty aligned with what I said. Storing sink obtained from Flux.create is a no go and should never be used / recommended.
    – bsideup
    Jun 4, 2020 at 10:43
1
  • You can use parallel() and runOn() instead of subscribeOn() to get sink.next() to run multi-threaded.
  • bsideup is also correct - you can use publishOn() to coerce downstream operators to run on one different Scheduler thread.

Here is my updated code:

import org.junit.jupiter.api.Test;

import reactor.core.publisher.DirectProcessor;
import reactor.core.publisher.Flux;
import reactor.core.publisher.FluxProcessor;
import reactor.core.publisher.FluxSink;
import reactor.core.scheduler.Schedulers;

/**
 * I want to construct my React pipelines during creation,
 * then emit events over the lifetime of my services.
 */
public class React1Test
{
    /**
     * Version 1 - use a DirectProcessor to dynamically emit items.
     */
    @Test
    public void testReact1() throws InterruptedException
    {
        // Create the flux and sink.
        FluxProcessor<String, String> fluxProcessor = DirectProcessor.<String>create().serialize();
        FluxSink<String> sink = fluxProcessor.sink();

        // Create the pipeline.
        fluxProcessor
            .parallel()
            .runOn(Schedulers.elastic())
            .doOnNext(str -> showDebugMsg(str))   // What thread do ops work on?
            .subscribe(str -> showDebugMsg(str)); // What thread does subscribe run on?

        // Give the multi-thread pipeline a second.
        Thread.sleep(1000);

        // Time passes ... things happen ...
        // Pass a few messages to the sink, emulating events.
        sink.next("a");
        sink.next("b");
        sink.next("c");

        // It's multi-thread so wait a sec to receive.
        Thread.sleep(1000);
    }

    // Used down below during Flux.create().
    private FluxSink<String> sink2;

    /**
     * Version 2 - use Flux.create() and its FluxSink object.
     */
    @Test
    public void testReact2() throws InterruptedException
    {
        // Create the flux and sink.
        Flux.<String>create(sink -> sink2 = sink)
            .parallel()
            .runOn(Schedulers.elastic())
            .doOnNext(str -> showDebugMsg(str))   // What thread do ops work on?
            .subscribe(str -> showDebugMsg(str)); // What thread does subscribe run on?

        // Give the multi-thread pipeline a second.
        Thread.sleep(1000);

        // Pass a few messages to the sink.
        sink2.next("a");
        sink2.next("b");
        sink2.next("c");

        // It's multi-thread so wait a sec to receive.
        Thread.sleep(1000);
    }

    // Show us what thread we're on.
    private static void showDebugMsg(String msg)
    {
        System.out.println(String.format("%s [%s]", msg, Thread.currentThread().getName()));
    }
}

Both versions produce the desired multi-threaded output:

a [elastic-2]
b [elastic-3]
c [elastic-4]
b [elastic-3]
a [elastic-2]
c [elastic-4]
4
  • The answer is not related to your question. You never asked for multi-threading. May 11, 2019 at 9:42
  • You're right, that's why I didn't mark it as the official answer, and also why I mentioned bsideup's perfectly good answer. There are two ways (so far) to use a sink outside of the lambda - use .publishOn() or use .parallel() with .runOn(). I'm sorry if that wasn't clear.
    – Luke
    May 12, 2019 at 21:03
  • Although parallel + runOn combination works, it is not for what it is designed. If you need to move the computation to another thread, publishOn is the operator that should be used.
    – bsideup
    Jun 4, 2020 at 10:45
  • The parallel + runOn combination is the only version that puts each item on a separate thread from the pool. publishOn and subscribeOn move the computation for all items to a single separate thread. If you know a better way to accomplish this, please let me know!
    – Luke
    Jun 8, 2020 at 14:53

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