1

I created a progressive web app with VueJS, the files are generated by vuecli. So I have the default registerServiceWorker.js I just comment the env condition:

/* eslint-disable no-console */

import { register } from 'register-service-worker'

// if (process.env.NODE_ENV === 'production') {
  register(`${process.env.BASE_URL}service-worker.js`, {
    ready () {
      console.log(
        'App is being served from cache by a service worker.\n' +
        'For more details, visit https://...'
      )
    },
    registered () {
      console.log('Service worker has been registered.')
    },
    cached () {
      console.log('Content has been cached for offline use.')
    },
    updatefound () {
      console.log('New content is downloading.')
    },
    updated () {
      console.log('New content is available; please refresh.')
    },
    offline () {
      console.log('No internet connection found. App is running in offline mode.')
    },
    error (error) {
      console.error('Error during service worker registration:', error)
    }
  })
// }

And here is my simple service-worker.js

const PRECACHE = 'precache-v1';
const RUNTIME = 'runtime';

// A list of local resources we always want to be cached.
const PRECACHE_URLS = [

];

// The install handler takes care of precaching the resources we always need.
self.addEventListener('install', event => {
  event.waitUntil(
    caches.open(PRECACHE)
      .then(cache => cache.addAll(PRECACHE_URLS))
      .then(self.skipWaiting())
  );
});

// The activate handler takes care of cleaning up old caches.
self.addEventListener('activate', event => {
  const currentCaches = [PRECACHE, RUNTIME];
  event.waitUntil(
    caches.keys().then(cacheNames => {
      return cacheNames.filter(cacheName => !currentCaches.includes(cacheName));
    }).then(cachesToDelete => {
      return Promise.all(cachesToDelete.map(cacheToDelete => {
        return caches.delete(cacheToDelete);
      }));
    }).then(() => self.clients.claim())
  );
});

// The fetch handler serves responses for same-origin resources from a cache.
// If no response is found, it populates the runtime cache with the response
// from the network before returning it to the page.
self.addEventListener('fetch', event => {
  // Skip cross-origin requests, like those for Google Analytics.
  if (event.request.url.startsWith(self.location.origin)) {
    event.respondWith(
      caches.match(event.request).then(cachedResponse => {
        if (cachedResponse) {
          return cachedResponse;
        }

        return caches.open(RUNTIME).then(cache => {
          return fetch(event.request).then(response => {
            // Put a copy of the response in the runtime cache.
            return cache.put(event.request, response.clone()).then(() => {
              return response;
            });
          });
        });
      })
    );
  }
});

And when I start my application another service-worker.js override mine if I look the chrome console. I don't understand what is this service worker I don't have if inside my project :

/* global self */

// This service worker file is effectively a 'no-op' that will reset any
// previous service worker registered for the same host:port combination.

// It is read and returned by a dev server middleware that is only loaded
// during development.

// In the production build, this file is replaced with an actual service worker
// file that will precache your site's local assets.

self.addEventListener('install', () => self.skipWaiting())

self.addEventListener('activate', () => {
  self.clients.matchAll({ type: 'window' }).then(windowClients => {
    for (const windowClient of windowClients) {
      // Force open pages to refresh, so that they have a chance to load the
      // fresh navigation response from the local dev server.
      windowClient.navigate(windowClient.url)
    }
  })
})

How can I use my service worker ?

  • This is intentional, just use a different name for development to overcome the default replacement of it, which effectively aims to disable the service worker and make your life easier upgrading your website etc – dankilev May 10 at 10:02
1

this seems indeed intentional. If you really wanted to test your service worker then feel free to change the name of the file to something different than the default name: service-worker.js, as for example service-worker-dev.js. The reason for this is that using a service worker in development mode can lead to extremely confusing debugging situations.

Note that there is a hint in the comment of the replacement service-worker:

// This service worker file is effectively a 'no-op' that will reset any
// previous service worker registered for the same host:port combination.

// It is read and returned by a dev server middleware that is only loaded
// during development.

// In the production build, this file is replaced with an actual service worker
// file that will precache your site's local assets.

Once you are happy with the service-worker doing its job you would love the fact that you could just disable it entirely when working in development mode :-) hope this helps!

  • Hmm ok I see, but do you know where is located the default file ? I don't get it. And where I have to place my service-worker-dev.js ? in public folder or src ? – John May 10 at 11:20
  • With regards to where to place is, you can place it in src as far it eventually gets copied to the public folder by gulp or whatever is deploying it (VueCli). Ideally, the service worker needs to be placed in the / of your domain so the relative path would be /service-worker-dev.js. This is because the service worker will only control resources under its current location. For example, if you want it to only control /some/folder/, then you can place the service worker in /some/folder/service-worker-dev.js. The public folder is most likely the / – dankilev May 10 at 11:46
  • It is bad practice to save directly into the public folder when you are using a deployment tool that is supposed to deploy the resources from src into the public for you. This is because next time you use the deployment tool you are likely to lose your file as it won't be in src! – dankilev May 10 at 11:52
  • Ok but when I put it into public it works, but when I put it into src it can't find the path – John May 10 at 11:57
  • 1
    I just use npm run build – John May 10 at 12:11

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