3

I'm creating a dictionary with keys and values from lists:

keys = ['Ptot', 'P1', 'P2', 'P3', 'Q1', 'Q2', 'Q3']
val = ['max', 'first', 'first', 'first', 'first', 'first', 'first']

I can manually create the dictionary by the following:

dictionary = {'Ptot': 'max', 'P1': 'first', 'P2': 'first', 'P3': 'first', 'Q1': 'first', 'Q2': 'first', 'Q3': 'first'}

How can I more elegantly create the dict from the lists by a for-loop? My problem is that the size of the lists are much bigger than this example.

  • are they always the same size ? – VnC May 10 '19 at 12:54
  • 2
    d = {} for k,v in zip(keys,val): d[k] = v – tonypdmtr May 10 '19 at 12:55
6

Use a dictionary comprehension, where you choose your key and value from the keys and val list as you are iterating over them, and just to be safe if the keys and val are of unequal lengths, you can zip all of them together via itertools.zip_longest, which will create an iterator of the longest subsequence, making sure if say keys is longer than val, we have None keys for them, maybe to reassign them in future (Thanks @quamrana)

from itertools import zip_longest
keys = ['Ptot', 'P1', 'P2', 'P3', 'Q1', 'Q2', 'Q3']
val = ['max', 'first', 'first', 'first', 'first', 'first', 'first']

print({k:v for k,v in zip_longest(keys, val)})

Output is

{'Ptot': 'max', 'P1': 'first', 'P2': 'first', 'P3': 'first', 'Q1': 'first', 'Q2': 'first', 'Q3': 'first'}

An example of bigger length of keys then val

from itertools import zip_longest
keys = ['Ptot', 'P1', 'P2', 'P3', 'Q1', 'Q2', 'Q3', 'QX', 'QY']
val = ['max', 'first', 'first', 'first', 'first', 'first', 'first']

print({k:v for k,v in zip_longest(keys, val)})

Output will be

{'Ptot': 'max', 'P1': 'first', 'P2': 'first', 
'P3': 'first', 'Q1': 'first', 'Q2': 'first', 'Q3': 'first', 
'QX': None, 'QY': None}

so we see that the keys are not lost here, but are used and the values set to None, but using zip will cause us to lose those keys!

But in case we want to only choose elements from the smaller list, we can do as follows (thanks @MitchelPaulin)

from itertools import zip_longest
keys = ['Ptot', 'P1', 'P2', 'P3', 'Q1', 'Q2', 'Q3', 'QX', 'QY']
val = ['max', 'first', 'first', 'first', 'first', 'first', 'first']

#Pick the smaller of the 2 lengths and iterate only on those indexes
length = min(len(keys), len(val))
print({keys[idx]:val[idx] for idx in range(length)})
  • 2
    Might want to use min(len(keys), len(val)) just to be safe – Mitchel Paulin May 10 '19 at 12:54
  • This will only work if both keys and val contain equal number of elements – Kunal Mukherjee May 10 '19 at 12:54
  • 2
    You could zip the keys and vals together. – quamrana May 10 '19 at 12:54
11

Have a look at zip:

>>> d = dict(zip(keys, val))
>>> d
{'Ptot': 'max', 'P1': 'first', 'P2': 'first', 'P3': 'first', 'Q1': 'first', 'Q2': 'first', 'Q3': 'first'}

Make an iterator that aggregates elements from each of the iterables.

Returns an iterator of tuples, where the i-th tuple contains the i-th element from each of the argument sequences or iterables.

Then we pass the return value to dict to create a dictionary. This is probably more efficient than a simple loop since built-ins run at C speed within Python and the implementors probably had more time to optimize it.

0

This approach uses zip with simple appending of the second list to match the sizes.

l1=['Ptot', 'P1', 'P2', 'P3', 'Q1', 'Q2', 'Q3', 'Q4' ]
l2=['max', 'first' ]

# make sure we have the same length
for i in range (len(l1)-len(l2)): l2.append(None)

d={}
d={k:v for k,v in zip(l1,l2)}
print(d)

Note that I used append(None) like zip_longest uses fillvalue=None.


{'Ptot': 'max', 'P1': 'first', 'P2': None, 'P3': None, 'Q1': None, 'Q2': None, 'Q3': None, 'Q4': None}

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