3

I have three classes, for example (TMyClass1, TMyClass2, and TMyClass3).

I have a function that takes as a parameter a string with the name of the type, and then instanciates that class given the type. Right now I'm using if statements, for example:

if(AFormName = 'xxx1') then
begin
    MyClass := MyClass1.Create;
end else if(AFormName = 'xxx2') then        
begin
    MyClass := MyClass2.Create;
end;

Etc..

Is there a way that I can store the type in a variable so I change link the strings to the types and avoid using that?

If it's any help, MyClass1, MyClass2 and MyClass3 all inherit from another class...

5
  • 3
    Yes. It is called a class reference. (link). Commented May 10, 2019 at 20:47
  • 1
    For example, type TMyTypeClass = class of TMyType; then you declare a variable var MyTypeClass: TMyTypeClass; and then assign it MyTypeClass := TMyClass1; and then actually use it MyClass := MyTypeClass.Create(); Commented May 10, 2019 at 21:15
  • And how do I associate a string to that type variable?
    – nick
    Commented May 10, 2019 at 21:18
  • 2
    Strings are another story.You don't reference by string name. You reference by the actual type itself. Why do you wish to use strings to reference classes? You might be able to use RTTI, but that seems overkill for such a simple task. Commented May 10, 2019 at 21:59
  • Use a dictionary Commented May 11, 2019 at 7:35

1 Answer 1

12

Look at the RTL's RegisterClass() and FindClass()/GetClass() functions, they were designed for exactly this kind of scenario, eg:

interface

uses
  ..., Classes;

type
  MyBase = class(TPersistent)
  public
    constructor Create; virtual;
  end;

  MyBaseClass = class of MyBase;

  MyClass1 = class(MyBase)
  public
    constructor Create; override;
  end;

  MyClass2 = class(MyBase)
  public
    constructor Create; override;
  end;

  MyClass3 = class(MyBase)
  public
    constructor Create; override;
  end;

...

function MakeMyClass(const Name: string): MyBase;

implementation

function MakeMyClass(const Name: string): MyBase;
begin
  Result := MyBaseClass(GetClass(Name)).Create;
end;

...

initialization
  RegisterClasses([MyClass1, MyClass2, MyClass3{, ...}]);

end.

Then you can do this:

var
  MyObj: MyBase;
begin
  MyObj := MakeMyClass('MyClass1');
  ...
  MyObj.Free;
end;

The drawback is that the classes must be derived from TPersistent. If you don't want to use TPersistent, or if you just want to use different names to create your class objects, it is not very hard to setup a custom factory, for instance by using a TDictionary, eg:

interface

type
  MyBase = class
  public
    constructor Create; virtual;
  end;

  MyBaseClass = class of MyBase;

  MyClass1 = class(MyBase)
  public
    constructor Create; override;
  end;

  MyClass2 = class(MyBase)
  public
    constructor Create; override;
  end;

  MyClass3 = class(MyBase)
  public
    constructor Create; override;
  end;

...

function MakeMyClass(const Name: string): MyBase;

implementation

uses
  System.Generics.Collections, System.SysUtils;

var
  MyFactory: TDictionary<string, MyBaseClass>;

function MakeMyClass(const Name: string): MyBase;
begin
  Result := MyFactory[Name].Create;
end;

...

initialization
  MyFactory := TDictionary<string, MyBaseClass>.Create;
  MyFactory.Add('xxx1', MyClass1);
  MyFactory.Add('xxx2', MyClass2);
  MyFactory.Add('xxx3', MyClass3);
finalization
  MyFactory.Free;
end.

Then you can do this:

var
  MyObj: MyBase;
begin
  MyObj := MakeMyClass('xxx1');
  ...
  MyObj.Free;
end;
2
  • Shouldn't that TMyBaseCreateFunc be MyBaseClass instead?? Thanks for all your help.
    – TomB
    Commented Jun 16, 2021 at 22:17
  • @TomB Yes it should. That was a remnant from a different version of the code, where I was using pointers to functions that create object instances. I have fixed it in my example here, thanks. Commented Jun 16, 2021 at 22:55

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