30

While running the .Net Core 2.0 API endpoint getting below error.

A suitable constructor for type 'RestDataService' could not be located. Ensure the type is concrete and services are registered for all parameters of a public constructor.

 public partial class RestDataService : IRestDataService
    {
        private static HttpClient _client;
        private static AppConfiguration _configuration;
        private const short MaxRetryAttempts = 3;
        private const short TimeSpanToWait = 2;

        public RestDataService(AppConfiguration configuration)
        {
            _client = configuration.HttpClient;
            _configuration = configuration;
        }
........

And my startup class is something like this :

  // This method gets called by the runtime. Use this method to add services to the container.
        public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
        {

            var config = new AppConfiguration
            {
                Environment = Configuration["environment"],
            };

            services.AddMvc().AddJsonOptions(o => o.SerializerSettings.NullValueHandling = NullValueHandling.Include);
            services.AddMemoryCache();
            services.AddCors();
            services.AddAutoMapper(AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies());
                services.AddSingleton(Configuration);
                services.AddSingleton(config);
            services.AddLogging();
            services.AddTransient<IRestDataService, RestDataService>();

services.AddHttpClient<IRestDataService, RestDataService>()
                .AddPolicyHandler(request => request.Method == HttpMethod.Get ? retryPolicy : noOp);

Any suggestions, to get rid of this? constructor is already public and all the parameters are registered in startup file

1
  • 1
    Share us the code for AppConfiguration. Why did you configure HttpClient in AppConfiguration?
    – Edward
    May 13, 2019 at 7:13

10 Answers 10

113

I received the error "A suitable constructor for type '<type>' could not be located." after accidentally generating a protected constructor instead of public constructor. Marking it back to public fixed it.

11
  • 5
    Thankyou so much for this. I had exactly the same issue. I just spent the last 30 mins removing constructor parameters and explicitly getting services from the provider. This post solved my issue. It should have been so obvious but i didn't spot it.
    – zeocrash
    Jun 24, 2021 at 16:08
  • 7
    And the Oscar goes to... Cryptc Mar 24, 2022 at 17:09
  • 3
    Also, ensure that Controller constructor is public, not internal Jun 6, 2022 at 13:08
  • 3
    Thank you, I lost an hour trying to figure out what was going on... Such a small detail, you helped me a lot!
    – MissRaphie
    Jan 24, 2023 at 16:51
  • 2
    @Guy_g23 It should remain private, with a public Instance property, like: public static Singleton Instance { get { return _instance; } } -- I recommend: singletons
    – Cryptc
    Apr 10, 2023 at 18:04
15

For AddHttpClient, you need to provide HttpClient parameter for RestDataService. And, you need to register AppConfiguration.

  1. RestDataService

    public class RestDataService: IRestDataService
    {
        private static HttpClient _client;
        private static AppConfiguration _configuration;
        private const short MaxRetryAttempts = 3;
        private const short TimeSpanToWait = 2;
    
        public RestDataService(AppConfiguration configuration
            , HttpClient client)
        {
            _client = configuration.HttpClient;
            _configuration = configuration;
        }
    }
    
  2. Startup.cs

    var config = new AppConfiguration
    {
        Environment = Configuration["environment"],
    };
    
    services.AddSingleton(typeof(AppConfiguration), config);
    services.AddHttpClient<IRestDataService, RestDataService>();
    
3
  • 2
    I Get it fixed by getting the HttpClient from IHttpClientFactory.GetClient() May 13, 2019 at 18:09
  • 2
    It works to add HttpClient as a parameter, but feels wrong that you're not actually using it.
    – GuyB
    Aug 1, 2019 at 11:42
  • This was my mistake. I was trying to use an IHttpClientFactory in the service client class constructor, but I needed to use HttpClient directly instead.
    – Nick
    Nov 17, 2023 at 20:07
6

I just ran across this issue because I was accidentally registering HttpClient to an interface.

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services) {
  // !! Wrong, this is done automatically by AddHttpClient<IMyService, MyService>()
  services.AddTransient<IMyService, MyService>();

  // !! There is no suitable constructor for IMyService, since it is an interface.
  services.AddHttpClient<IMyService>();

  // Instead, let AddHttpClient manage your service's lifetime, 
  // and tell it the implementation.
  // It is registered with a Transient lifetime as described below.
  services.AddHttpClient<IMyService, MyService>();
}

Important context, from source: https://www.stevejgordon.co.uk/ihttpclientfactory-patterns-using-typed-clients-from-singleton-services

When defining typed clients in your ConfigureServices method, the typed service is registered with transient scope. This means that a new instance is created by the DI container every time one is needed. The reason this occurs is that a HttpClient instance is injected into the typed client instance. That HttpClient instance is intended to be short lived so that the HttpClientFactory can ensure that the underlying handlers (and connections) are released and recycled.

4

You have to define which concrete class of interface you want to use for IRestDataService. So, define like this.

services.AddTransient<IRestDataService, RestDataService>();

Remove static keyword before AppConfiguration.

private readonly AppConfiguration _configuration;
4
  • 1
    It is already there in startup class under ConfigurationServices() method.. But with Transient scope, services.AddTransient<IRestDataService, RestDataService>(); May 11, 2019 at 5:11
  • 1
    So make sure it is defined in services once. And remove static type from AppConfiguration declaretion in RestDataService.
    – prisar
    May 11, 2019 at 5:18
  • 1
    Any thoughts ? Issue occurs for only specific controller endpoints. Other Controller endpoints working fine May 11, 2019 at 17:25
  • 1
    Did you remove static type of AppConfiguation
    – prisar
    May 12, 2019 at 3:41
1

In my case I got this problem when inattentively duplicating row with DI service registration to register new service but accidentally missed that this is .AddHttpClient() method instead of .AddTransient() or .AddScoped()

1

This doesn't directly answer the question, but is related.

For anyone using ActivatorUtilities.CreateInstance<T>(IServiceProvider, params object[] parameters) it's worth mentioning that every parameter must be in the parameters of the class you are creating. I.e.

public class Example 
{
    public Example(AppConfiguration configuration) 
    {
       ...
    }
}

_ = ActivatorUtilities.CreateInstance<Example>(_serviceProvider, new HttpClient())

This will fail as the Example class doesn't have a constructor that has a HttpClient paramter

1

I had forgotten to add a RequestDelegate next parameter to my middleware constructor. Without this, I would get an exception with the message "A suitable constructor for type [Type] could not be located. Ensure the type is concrete and services are registered for all parameters of a public constructor" upon calling IApplicationBuilder.UseMiddleware. My constructor was already public, and my services were all registered. I just needed to add RequestDelegate next to my parameters.

1

This is such a crazy edge-case answer, but if you are building an executable console app with dependency injection, the build settings could be messing you up.

If you select Trim unused code, the publish might trim stuff that is only being injected and not called directly.

1

The problem you write your field private you must write them as public like this:

    public static HttpClient _client;
    public static AppConfiguration _configuration;
    public const short MaxRetryAttempts = 3;
    public const short TimeSpanToWait = 2;
0

If you get this error with AddHttpClient, the problem is probably caused by not passing the HttpClient object into the Proxy.

Proxy.cs

private readonly HttpClient _httpClient;

public Proxy(HttpClient httpClient)
{
    _httpClient = httpClient;
}

Startup.cs

services.AddHttpClient<IProxy, Proxy>

When using with AddHttpClient, HttpClient is required in the constructor

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