7

Loading a module (ABC) with require works in one module of a distribution while it fails in another module of the distribution. What could be the reason that loading ABC with require fails in one place?

require Name::ABC;
my $new = Name::ABC.new(); # dies: You cannot create an instance of this type (ABC)

perl6 -v
This is Rakudo Star version 2019.03.1 built on MoarVM version 2019.03
implementing Perl 6.d.

The the required module: App::DBBrowser::Subqueries

App::DBBrowser::Union, line 80: OK *

App::DBBrowser::Join, lines 66 and 191: OK *

App::DBBrowser::Table::Extensions, line 49: OK *

App::DBBrowser, line 690: You cannot create an instance of this type (Subqueries) *

App::DBBrowser::CreateTable, line 112: You cannot create an instance of this type (Subqueries) *

* version 0.0.1

  • From the looks of the code, it's impossible to know what's the problem here. Can you please show the code for Name::ABC? – jjmerelo May 11 at 15:45
  • Your acceptance of @ugexe's answer suggests you've applied his solution and have confirmed it fixed your problem. But I'm crazy enough to think maybe not. A clarifying comment, here or on ugexe's answer, or edit to your question, would be helpful to me. TIA for your consideration. – raiph May 13 at 9:50
  • 1
    As far as I can see, it's working. The links now point to the changed files. – sid_com May 13 at 12:31
5
$ cat XXX.pm6
unit class XXX;

$ cat ZZZ.pm6
module ZZZ {
    require XXX;
    XXX.new;
    say "OK";
}

$ perl6 -I. -e 'use ZZZ;'
===SORRY!===
You cannot create an instance of this type (XXX)

From the documentation:

require loads a compunit and imports definite symbols at runtime.

You are doing a runtime load of a module while also expecting the symbols for that module to exist at compile time. Instead you should use indirect name lookup (as shown at the bottom of the documentation page linked earlier):

$ cat XXX.pm6
unit class XXX;

$ cat ZZZ.pm6
module ZZZ {
    require XXX;
    ::("XXX").new;
    say "OK";
}

$ perl6 -I. -e 'use ZZZ;'
OK
  • "You are doing a runtime load of a module while also expecting the symbols for that module to exist at compile time." The require Foo::Bar statement means that one symbol is brought into existence at compile-time, namely Foo::Bar. And that's the only symbol that's being explicitly assumed (though .new is expected to work). So the compiler of course doesn't complain. Although the error message makes perfect sense when you know what's going on here it is, imo, LTA. Perhaps there would best be another repr that's a variant of the Uninstantiable one that yields a more helpful message? – raiph May 16 at 12:38
5

I think it's because require is a runtime load whereas use is compile time.

Generally I'd use use unless I have a need for dynamic module loading at runtime.

  • 1
    Loading with use works fine. – sid_com May 11 at 12:47
2

This is a nanswer, a "dunno, here's some further thoughts" comment.

Apparently the error you're quoting appears if .new is called on a value that's got the is repr('Uninstantiable') trait set on it. (The actual code displaying it varies by backend but if you're running on MoarVM the message is generated by this code.)

In your code it presumably means that, at the point the App::DBBrowser::Subqueries.new lines execute, the value that the App::DBBrowser::Subqueries symbol is bound to in a given module is either an initial uninstantiable value established when the symbol is first added to the calling module's lexical symbol table or the final instantiable class that the symbol gets rebound to at a later point.

Using use per @Scimon's answer fixes the problem presumably because it forces everything to happen early, before the .new call.

Perhaps using the dynamic symbol lookup per @ugexe's answer fixes problems because it forces the value bound to the symbol the .new acts on to be resolved as late as possible and this delay ensures it's an instantiable value. Or perhaps @ugexe's answer doesn't work for you.

But either way, that still begs the question... why? :)

And if it's related to precompilation, is the conclusion that one should always either use no precompilation; or always use dynamic lookup for any symbols required in a module?

2

use loads and imports a module at compile-time while require only loads a module at runtime.

Since the namespace is checked at compile-time, you can't just access it as you would a module that is loaded and imported with use.

You can get around that by symbolic references, but you can also capture the namespace into a variable.
(Assuming there is only a single namespace in the module, and it is the same as the name used to load it)

Foo.pm6:

unit module Foo;

sub fubar () { say 'fubar' }
my \Foo = do require Foo;
Foo::fubar(); # fubar␤

(Note that the name of the variable doesn't have to be the same.)

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