121

I’m currently evaluating the pros ‘n’ cons of replacing Angular’s resp. RxJS’ Observable with plain Promise so that I can use async and await and get a more intuitive code style.

One of our typical scenarios: Load some data within ngOnInit. Using Observables, we do:

ngOnInit () {
  this.service.getData().subscribe(data => {
    this.data = this.modifyMyData(data);
  });
}

When I return a Promise from getData() instead, and use async and await, it becomes:

async ngOnInit () {
  const data = await this.service.getData();
  this.data = this.modifyMyData(data);
}

Now, obviously, Angular will not “know”, that ngOnInit has become async. I feel that this is not a problem: My app still works as before. But when I look at the OnInit interface, the function is obviously not declared in such a way which would suggest that it can be declared async:

ngOnInit(): void;

So -- bottom line: Is it reasonable what I’m doing here? Or will I run into any unforseen problems?

5
  • 6
    According to this comment in issue 17420: "it's not a problem for someone to use async ngOnInit, it is just an awkward/not recommended coding practice."
    – ConnorsFan
    Commented May 11, 2019 at 16:27
  • 5
    @ConnorsFan I’ve actually read exactly this issue before opening my post :-) (should have linked it). I am still not sure, whether “awkward” and “not recommended” have any objective reasons, or whether the Angular team just wants to push towards the reactive style?
    – qqilihq
    Commented May 11, 2019 at 16:32
  • 1
    Here is another good read on this subject.
    – ConnorsFan
    Commented May 11, 2019 at 16:40
  • @qqilihq - Hi, I'm looking at doing this conversion just now. Did you go ahead with it and were you happy with the outcome? Any issues...?
    – Lee Gunn
    Commented Apr 11, 2020 at 11:04
  • 5
    @LeeGunn It’s a so-so. I used it here and there, but all in all very sparingly. Reason (a) being the error handling (explained in detail below by @Reactgular), (b) code gets a little less “nested” (no callbacks), but the gain is quite small, and (c) we’re working with several “real” Observables in the codebase (which continuously update) -- there await will not help, and we’d end up with two inconsistent ways (or confuse new team members).
    – qqilihq
    Commented Apr 14, 2020 at 15:10

8 Answers 8

79

It is no different than what you had before. ngOnInit will return a Promise and the caller will ignore that promise. This means that the caller will not wait for everything in your method to finish before it proceeds. In this specific case it means the view will finish being configured and the view may be launched before this.data is set.

That is the same situation you had before. The caller would not wait for your subscriptions to finish and would possibly launch the app before this.data had been populated. If your view is relying on data then you likely have some kind of ngIf setup to prevent you from accessing it.

I personally don't see it as awkward or a bad practice as long as you're aware of the implications. However, the ngIf can be tedious (they would be needed in either way). I have personally moved to using route resolvers where it makes sense so I can avoid this situation. The data is loaded before the route finishes navigating and I can know the data is available before the view is ever loaded.

2
  • 9
    Thank you for mentionning route resolvers. I think it is a better approach to this problem that occurs very often.
    – Leogout
    Commented Dec 3, 2020 at 16:09
  • 1
    "In this specific case it means the view will finish being configured and the view may be launched before this.data is set." - this is the key I think, and it's not obvious unless you think about it, and is likely to be even less obvious to future developers who are trying to maintain your code. For this reason I would agree with the comment referenced above that this is in fact "awkward" and "bad practice".
    – Dan King
    Commented Apr 28, 2021 at 10:37
43

Now, obviously, Angular will not “know”, that ngOnInit has become async. I feel that this is not a problem: My app still works as before.

Semantically it will compile fine and run as expected, but the convenience of writing async / wait comes at a cost of error handling, and I think it should be avoid.

Let's look at what happens.

What happens when a promise is rejected:

public ngOnInit() {
    const p = new Promise((resolver, reject) => reject(-1));
}

The above generates the following stack trace:

core.js:6014 ERROR Error: Uncaught (in promise): -1
    at resolvePromise (zone-evergreen.js:797) [angular]
    at :4200/polyfills.js:3942:17 [angular]
    at new ZoneAwarePromise (zone-evergreen.js:876) [angular]
    at ExampleComponent.ngOnInit (example.component.ts:44) [angular]
    .....

We can clearly see that the unhandled error was triggered by a ngOnInit and also see which source code file to find the offending line of code.

What happens when we use async/wait that is reject:

    public async ngOnInit() {
        const p = await new Promise((resolver, reject) => reject());
    }

The above generates the following stack trace:

core.js:6014 ERROR Error: Uncaught (in promise):
    at resolvePromise (zone-evergreen.js:797) [angular]
    at :4200/polyfills.js:3942:17 [angular]
    at rejected (tslib.es6.js:71) [angular]
    at Object.onInvoke (core.js:39699) [angular]
    at :4200/polyfills.js:4090:36 [angular]
    at Object.onInvokeTask (core.js:39680) [angular]
    at drainMicroTaskQueue (zone-evergreen.js:559) [<root>]

What happened? We have no clue, because the stack trace is outside of the component.

Still, you might be tempted to use promises and just avoid using async / wait. So let's see what happens if a promise is rejected after a setTimeout().

    public ngOnInit() {
        const p = new Promise((resolver, reject) => {
            setTimeout(() => reject(), 1000);
        });
    }

We will get the following stack trace:

core.js:6014 ERROR Error: Uncaught (in promise): [object Undefined]
    at resolvePromise (zone-evergreen.js:797) [angular]
    at :4200/polyfills.js:3942:17 [angular]
    at :4200/app-module.js:21450:30 [angular]
    at Object.onInvokeTask (core.js:39680) [angular]
    at timer (zone-evergreen.js:2650) [<root>]

Again, we've lost context here and don't know where to go to fix the bug.

Observables suffer from the same side effects of error handling, but generally the error messages are of better quality. If someone uses throwError(new Error()) the Error object will contain a stack trace, and if you're using the HttpModule the Error object is usually a Http response object that tells you about the request.

So the moral of the story here: Catch your errors, use observables when you can and don't use async ngOnInit(), because it will come back to haunt you as a difficult bug to find and fix.

2
  • 1
    The missing part here is how would the stacktrace look when the error happens in the Observable are they any better?
    – Peter
    Commented Jun 5, 2020 at 17:42
  • 1
    @Peter most observables that throw an error are usually from HttpClient and are asynchronous. So when the error is thrown the stacktrace will be from outside of your source code. You can use the catchError() operator to handle errors, and if you just want stacktrace help, then catchError(err => throwError(err)) would rethrow the error and add your source code to the call stack.
    – Reactgular
    Commented Jun 6, 2020 at 9:08
15

I wonder what are the downsides of an immediately invoked function expression :

    ngOnInit () {
      (async () => {
        const data = await this.service.getData();
        this.data = this.modifyMyData(data);
      })();
    }

It is the only way I can imagine to make it work without declaring ngOnInit() as an async function

3
  • but this is as good as having a separate async function and calling it within ngOnInit ngOnInit () { this.fetchData(); } private async fetchData(){ const data = await this.service.getData(); this.data = this.modifyMyData(data); }
    – ABajpai
    Commented Mar 16, 2021 at 9:27
  • @ABajpai , yes, but without having a separate async function and without making ngOninit() async, which is what the user seemed to ask for. Commented Mar 18, 2021 at 18:28
  • 1
    it is the same thing as just running the promise without await, it will work, but not wait for it to finish
    – Jonathan
    Commented Oct 5, 2021 at 4:36
6

ngOnInit does NOT wait for the promise to complete. You can make it an async function if you feel like using await like so:

import { take } from 'rxjs/operators';

async ngOnInit(): Promise<any> {
  const data = await firstValueFrom(this.service.getData());
  this.data = this.modifyMyData(data);
}

However, if you're using ngOnInit instead of the constructor to wait for a function to complete, you're basically doing the equivalent of this:

import { take } from 'rxjs/operators';

constructor() {
  firstValueFrom(this.service.getData())
    .then((data => {;
      this.data = this.modifyMyData(data);
    });
}

It will run the async function, but it WILL NOT wait for it to complete. If you notice sometimes it completes and sometimes it doesn't, it really just depends on the timing of your function.

Using the ideas from this post, you can basically run outside zone.js. NgZone does not include scheduleMacroTask, but zone.js is imported already into angular.

Solution

import { isObservable, Observable } from 'rxjs';
import { take } from 'rxjs/operators';

declare const Zone: any;

async waitFor<T>(prom: Promise<T> | Observable<T>): Promise<T> {
  if (isObservable(prom)) {
    prom = firstValueFrom(prom);
  }
  const macroTask = Zone.current
    .scheduleMacroTask(
      `WAITFOR-${Math.random()}`,
      () => { },
      {},
      () => { }
    );
  return prom.then((p: T) => {
    macroTask.invoke();
    return p;
  });
}

I personally put this function in my core.module.ts, although you can put it anywhere.

Use it like so:

constructor(private cm: CoreModule) { 
  const p = this.service.getData();
  this.post = this.cm.waitFor(p);
}

You could also check for isBrowser to keep your observable, or wait for results.

Conversely, you could also import angular-zen and use it like in this post, although you will be importing more than you need.

J

UPDATE: 2/26/22 - Now uses firstValueFrom since .toPromise() is depreciated.

4
  • async ngOnInit(): Promise<any> did the trick for me.
    – RyuCoder
    Commented Jun 24, 2020 at 14:57
  • 1
    Febuary 2022 and Observable.toPromise() is now deprecated. Working in Angular 13 and using SSR/prerendering I found this solution to be fully featured and work out of the box.
    – Rob Hall
    Commented Feb 26, 2022 at 19:21
  • 1
    @Rob Hall - I updated it to use firstValueFrom, as that is the new version. Sometimes you should use lastValueFrom instead. The recommended solution you listed is extremely complicated. My version is simplified. - J
    – Jonathan
    Commented Feb 27, 2022 at 1:02
  • @jonathan agreed. That version also requires injection so it is not as straight forward to work into an existing algorithm.
    – Rob Hall
    Commented Feb 28, 2022 at 11:49
5

I used try catch inside the ngOnInit():

async ngOnInit() {      
   try {           
       const user = await userService.getUser();
    } catch (error) {           
        console.error(error);       
    }    
} 

Then you get a more descriptive error and you can find where the bug is

3

You can use rxjs function of.

of(this.service.getData());

Converts the promise to an observable sequence.

2
  • 5
    Thanks. But my goal was to avoid Observable in favor of the await syntax (I've grown a strong aversion against callback-based syntax, back in the days :-) ).
    – qqilihq
    Commented Sep 11, 2019 at 8:15
  • 7
    @qqilihq i agree, Promise was ugly, then we got await and async and i was happy, now we have Observable and we are back to ugly but more useful than Promise.
    – Peter
    Commented Jun 5, 2020 at 17:47
2

The correct answer to this question is to use Resolver feature of Angular. With Resolve, your component will not be rendered until you tell it to render.

From docs:

Interface that classes can implement to be a data provider. A data provider class can be used with the router to resolve data during navigation. The interface defines a resolve() method that is invoked when the navigation starts. The router waits for the data to be resolved before the route is finally activated.

2
  • 2
    Resolvers are a concept to consider, but they’re not a silver bullet. There are situations where onInit is desirable. (e.g. less code scattering, showing a loading indicator in the target view, …)
    – qqilihq
    Commented Sep 13, 2021 at 9:25
  • Docs say Resolver is deprecated
    – Benji A.
    Commented Apr 2 at 13:57
0

I would do this a bit differently, you don't show your html template, but I'm assuming you're doing something in there with data, i.e.

<p> {{ data.Name }}</p> <!-- or whatever -->

Is there a reason you're not using the async pipe?, i.e.

<p> {{ (data$ | async).Name }}</p>

or

<p *ngIf="(data$ | async) as data"> {{ data.name }} </p>

and in your ngOnInit:

data$: Observable<any>; //change to your data structure
ngOnInit () {
  this.data$ = this.service.getData().pipe(
    map(data => this.modifyMyData(data))
  );
}

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