0

I get a blank output. I'm a newbie and have been struggling on this for some time.
I have gotten 0 errors by the compiler.

Also what can be improved on this?

How can I get the length of const char* as an int instead of size_t without having to use static_cast.

#include <iostream>
#include <cassert>

class String
{
private:
    char* Str_Buffer{};
    int Str_Size{};
public:
    String(const char* string = " ")
        : Str_Size{ static_cast<int>(strlen(string)) }
    {
        Str_Buffer = new char[Str_Size];
    }

    String& operator=(const String& string)
    {
        if (this == &string)
            return *this;

        delete[] Str_Buffer;

        Str_Size = string.Str_Size;
        if (string.Str_Buffer)
        {
            Str_Buffer = new char[Str_Size];

            for (int index{ 0 }; index < Str_Size; ++index)
                Str_Buffer[index] = string.Str_Buffer[index];
        }
        return *this;
    }

    char& operator[](const int index)
    {
        assert(index >= 0);
        assert(index < Str_Size);
        return Str_Buffer[index];
    }

    friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, const String& string)
    {
        out << string.Str_Buffer;
        return out;
    }

    ~String()
    {
        delete[] Str_Buffer;
    }
};

int main()
{
    String word("Hello world!");
    std::cout << word;

    return 0;
}
1

I get a blank output.

You don't fill your String::Str_Buffer with meaningful data in the constructor. You could use std::strcpy() from <cstring> to do that. std::strlen() is also declared in that header file. To use std::strcpy() the memory pointed to by String::Str_Buffer needs to be one char bigger than the string you want to copy there because strings in C and C++ are zero-terminated ('\0').

How can I get the length of const char* as an int instead of size_t without having to use static_cast.

Why would you want an int? Sizes of objects in C++ are measured with values of type std::size_t (defined in several headers but when in doubt include <cstddef>). std::size_t is guaranteed to be big enough to handle all object sizes. It is for example the return type of std::strlen() and the sizeof-operator.

Your assignment operator is not exception-safe:

String& operator=(const String& string)
{
    // ...

    delete[] Str_Buffer;  // the old state is now gone

    Str_Size = string.Str_Size;
    if (string.Str_Buffer)
    {
        Str_Buffer = new char[Str_Size];  // when new[] throws, the object
                                          // will be in an undefined state
    // ...

Possible but not elegant solution:

String& operator=(const String& string)
{
    char *temp = new[string.Str_Size];

    // copy string.Str_Buffer to temp

    delete[] Str_Buffer;
    Str_Buffer = temp;
    Str_Size string.Str_Size

    return *this;
}

See Copy-and-Swap for an better solution.


Resource Management

Please familiarize yourself with The Rule of Five and the Copy-and-Swap Idiom.

A starting point for a class that manages a string could look like that:

#include <cassert>   // assert()
#include <cstddef>   // std::size_t
#include <cstring>   // std::strlen(), std::strcpy()
#include <utility>   // std::swap(), std::exchange()
#include <iostream>

class string_t
{
    size_t  length  = 0;
    char   *data    = nullptr;

public:
    string_t() = default;

    string_t(char const *str)
    : length { str ? std::strlen(str) : 0  },
      data   { new char[length + 1]{}      }
    {
        str && std::strcpy(data, str);
    }

    string_t(string_t const &other)  // copy constructor
    : length { other.length            },
      data   { new char[length + 1]{}  }
    {
        other.data && std::strcpy(data, other.data);
    }

    string_t(string_t &&other)  // move constructor
    : length { std::exchange(other.length, 0)      },  // steal others resources and
      data   { std::exchange(other.data, nullptr)  }   // give other a state it's
    {}                                                 // destructor can work with

    string_t& operator=(string_t other)   // assignment operator
    {                                     // mind: other gets copied
        std::swap(length, other.length);  // steal other's resources
        std::swap(data, other.data);      // other's destructor will
    }                                     // take care of ours.

    ~string_t() { delete[] data; }

    std::size_t get_length() const { return length; }

    char& operator[](std::size_t index)
    {
        assert(index < length);
        return data[index];
    }

    // stream-insertion operator:
    friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream &os, string_t const &str)
    {
        return os << (str.data ? str.data : "");
    }
};

int main()
{
    string_t foo{ "Hello!" };  // char const* constructor
    std::cout << foo << '\n';

    string_t bar{ foo };  // copy constructor
    std::cout << bar << '\n';

    string_t qux{ string_t{ "World!" } };  // move constructor (from a temporary)
    std::cout << qux << '\n';

    bar = qux;  // assignment operator
    std::cout << bar << '\n';
}
-1

First of all, you need to include for strlen. You get a blank output because the constructor does not write the input string to Str_Buffer. You may use std::copy to copy the memory to the allocated buffer.

You have to use static cast, because strlen returns std::size_t. Just change the type of Str_Size to std::size_t to get rid of the static cast.

Also take a look at the rule of five. Defining a move and copy constuctor will improve performace of your code.

See a working version of your code below:

#include <iostream>
#include <cassert>
#include <cstring>
#include <algorithm>


class String
{
private:
    char* Str_Buffer;
    std::size_t Str_Size;
public:
    String(const char* string = " ")
        : Str_Size{ strlen(string) }
    {
        Str_Buffer = new char[Str_Size];
        std::copy(string, string + Str_Size, Str_Buffer);
    }

    String(const String& other)
       : Str_Size(other.Str_Size)
    {
        Str_Buffer = new char[Str_Size];
        std::copy(other.Str_Buffer, other.Str_Buffer + Str_Size, Str_Buffer);
    }

    String(String && other)
    {
        *this = std::move(other);
    }

    String& operator=(const String& string)
    {
        if (this == &string)
            return *this;

        delete[] Str_Buffer;

        Str_Size = string.Str_Size;
        if (string.Str_Buffer)
        {
            Str_Buffer = new char[Str_Size];

            for (std::size_t index = 0; index < Str_Size; ++index)
                Str_Buffer[index] = string.Str_Buffer[index];
        }
        return *this;
    }

    char& operator[](const int index)
    {
        assert(index >= 0);
        assert(index < Str_Size);
        return Str_Buffer[index];
    }

    friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, const String& string)
    {
        out << string.Str_Buffer;
        return out;
    }

    ~String()
    {
        delete[] Str_Buffer;
    }
};

int main()
{
    String word("Hello world!");
    std::cout << word;

    return 0;
}
  • 2
    std::copy is much, much better. It'll be just as fast as memcpy (in fact it'll be equivalent to memmove for a type like this) except it is type-safe, so doesn't break horribly and catastrophically and potentially silently when you change your types. – Lightness Races in Orbit May 11 at 19:51
  • 2
    Define "working". Rule of Five – Swordfish May 11 at 19:51
  • Well, with working I meant "It produces the desired output". Of course you guys are completely right. I just adjusted my answer. – Draft25 May 11 at 20:28
  • Defining a move and copy constuctor will improve performace of your code. – Nope. A custom copy constructor is needed so objects of that type can be safely copied (deep copy). The default copy-ctor does only copy the pointer value, which would lead (amongst other things) to delete[]ing the same pointer value twice when more than one destructor ever runs. Your move-ctor should swap the members of *this with the members of other. Why the for-loop in the assignment operator? Could be exception-save with copy-and-swap. And it is std::strlen(). – Swordfish May 11 at 21:54
  • out << string.Str_Buffer; won't work well because your Str_Buffer is not zero-terminated. – Swordfish May 11 at 21:55

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.