23

This question already has an answer here:

Consider:

for (auto i = 0; i < g.size(); ++i)
    for (auto j = 0; j < g.size(); ++j) if (g[i][j] == 0) dfs(g, i, j), ++regions;
return regions;

I don't like one line code. What does the code execute in the if()?

I am confused by the "," sign.

Usually I would write it as:

  for (auto i = 0; i < g.size(); ++i)
  {
      for (auto j = 0; j < g.size(); ++j)
      {
          if (g[i][j] == 0)
          {
             dfs(g, i, j)
          }
          ,++regions; // I am not sure what to do here. Inside the "if" scope??
      }
} 
  return regions;

marked as duplicate by phuclv, David Z, Community May 12 at 4:11

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

29

The programmer has used the comma operator to provide two unrelated expressions in a single statement. Because it's a single statement, both expressions are "inside" the if condition.

It's a poor hack, which would be better done with actual {} braces surrounding two statements.

Your example is not equivalent; it should be:

if (g[i][j] == 0) 
{
   dfs(g, i, j);
   ++regions;
}
  • 7
    ohh god, why why why would anyone write this code. Thanks – Gilad May 11 at 20:50
  • 8
    @Gilad Trying to be clever, most likely! And failing. – Lightness Races in Orbit May 11 at 20:51
  • 4
    @LightnessRacesinOrbit This is a habit of old school programmers due to small monitor resolution (25 rows 80 columns) code was writing as short as possible. More code on one page better readability. Try read modern code on such monitor and you will see how many empty rows in it. – Andrey Sv May 11 at 21:14
  • 3
    Of course, that hack is especially useful for macros, which one also should avoid assiduously. – Deduplicator May 11 at 21:33
  • 3
    @AndreySv Such programmers have had some thirty years to break that habit, i.e. since before C++ even existed. – Lightness Races in Orbit May 11 at 22:59

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