2

I have the following data frame:

df = data.frame(x = c('a', 'b'),
                y = c(2,4))

and the corresponding graph:

ggplot(df, aes(x,y)) + 
  geom_col()

enter image description here

My scale is going from 1 to 5 so I don't want the 0 to appear on the y axis but want the y axis to start at 1. Yet I still want the blank space below the bars.

ggplot(df, aes(x,y)) + 
  geom_col() + 
  coord_cartesian(ylim = c(1,4)) +
  scale_y_continuous(
    expand = expand_scale(add = c(0.2,0)))

enter image description here

As you see, the y axis indeed starts at 1, but now the space below the 1 is filled with the black bar, and is no longer blank. The other posts I consulted deal with cases when the y axis starts at 0 so expand_scale() did the job. Not in my case.

Any idea on how to resolve this issue?

  • Don't know it. Want to give more details?\ – Rtist May 12 '19 at 8:40
  • 7
    If you want to produce a custom graphic with specific labels, you can just re-label the axis. But keep in mind that not including 0 and presenting the result as a bar chart is pure blasphemy. – liborm May 12 '19 at 8:52
  • I am not sure why it is a "pure blasphem". In my research, participants indicate the extend to witch they agree with a statement, from 1 (I don't agree) to 5 (I agree). So there is really no 0 in my data. – Rtist May 12 '19 at 9:16
  • Then your use falls to the 'custom plot' category. A bar chart would have your 1-5 on the x axis, and response counts on the y. As far as I understand, you want to display a single case, drawing no mark if the answer was 1, and a bar from 1 to the answer value otherwise? – liborm May 12 '19 at 17:49
2

You could use the limits in scale_y_continuous to indicate what range you want to show. NA in the limits is 'use the default'. Now, normally that would take the away both bars because they are out-of-bounds (oob), but you could fix that by setting the oob argument of the scales to squish, which is a function found in the scales package.

library(scales)

ggplot(df, aes(x,y)) + 
  geom_col() +
  scale_y_continuous(limits = c(1, NA), oob = squish)

enter image description here

| improve this answer | |
  • It worked, thanks. Can you explain why the bars disappear if I just set the limits argument? Why are they out of range? The values in the data above are 2 and 4, so why setting limits = c(1, NA) take the bars away? – Rtist May 15 '19 at 14:39
  • ggplot sees the bars as rectangles that have ymin = 0 coordinates, so when the limits = c(1, NA) the ymin will be below the lower limit. Therefore, the default behaviour (which uses scales::censor()) will remove these rectangles because the coordinates are out of bounds. – teunbrand May 15 '19 at 14:46
2

In ggplot you can use position_nudge() to cheekily move an entire geom by a fixed distance:

ggplot(df, aes(x,y)) + 
      geom_col(position = position_nudge(y=1)) + #move everything up one
      ylim(c(0,5)) #set the y axis limits
| improve this answer | |
  • I already have position = position_dodge() in my code. How can I use position_nudge() on it? – Rtist May 12 '19 at 10:27
  • Have you tried just swapping position_dodge() for position_nudge()? Depending on your data it might do what you want. Otherwise I'm not sure. – Lovell May 12 '19 at 12:23
0

If I well understand your problem, you have several levels of response and you want for each individual to represent it. Could you consider a representation with a y axis which is discret ?

It doesn't avoid your problem of 0 or 1 but in fact only level are importants. If there is nothing it is just because you don't have the answer so it is 0. I don't know if you agree with my proposition :

df = data.frame(x = c('a', 'b', 'c', 'd'),
                y = factor(c(1, 2, 3, 4), levels = 1:4))


ggplot(df, aes(x, y)) + 
  geom_col() +
  scale_y_discrete(expand = expand_scale(add = 1.2))
| improve this answer | |
  • Both approach did not work. In both the 0 appears on the y axis. As I specified in the main text, I need the y axis to start at 1 – Rtist May 12 '19 at 9:03
0

Change coord_cartesian() to the following:

coord_cartesian(ylim=c(1,5), expand=F)

Here's the full call to ggplot() with the change:

ggplot(df, aes(x,y)) + 
  geom_col() + 
  coord_cartesian(ylim=c(1,5), expand=F) +
  scale_y_continuous(
    expand = expand_scale(add = c(0.2,0)))
| improve this answer | |
  • 5
    While this code may solve the question, including an explanation of how and why this solves the problem would really help to improve the quality of your post, and probably result in more up-votes. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, not just the person asking now. Please edit your answer to add explanations and give an indication of what limitations and assumptions apply. – Dharman Sep 29 '19 at 21:05

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