1

As far as I know, C++ does not support an operator like 'realloc(void *, size_t)' in C language.

However, std::vector should have a buffer to contain data, and the buffer should be expanded or compacted.

Then how could it be done to resize the buffer of std::vector without 'realloc' function?

Is it be done just by allocating new buffer, copy or move all elements and destructing previous buffer? I think it is inefficient.

  • It creates new memory, then moves the elements (move or copy constructor call). Besides, there 's HeapReAlloc (and some equivalent in other systems) that would realloc if that was the method. Even if it used realloc, unless the items were satisfiying TriviallyCopyable they couldn't be copied by memcpy. – Michael Chourdakis May 12 '19 at 14:35
  • "As far as I know, C++ does not support an operator like 'realloc(void *, size_t)' in C language" - yes, it does. C++ is compatible with C in this regard. Of course, you almost certainly don't want to use it in C++ code. – user2100815 May 12 '19 at 14:39
  • 1
    The problem with realloc is that it only works if memory can be expanded w/o changing the previously allocated and likely used memory. This is memory fragmentation and OS dependent – doug May 12 '19 at 14:45
  • All standard containers that don't have a fixed number of elements (std::vector, std::list, etc) make requests to an object called an allocator, which does the actual work of memory management, via a defined interface. Allocators and containers tend to be pretty carefully crafted for performance and correctness by the authors of your standard library (or compiler vendor). Before claiming they are inefficient, write code of your own that does the same thing, get it working correctly, and compare. (Beginners tend to over-estimate their ability to write efficient and correct code). – Peter May 12 '19 at 14:50
  • 1
    @Peter, as far the allocators are concerned, their implementation is rather simple. It's vector<> and the containers themselves that don't allocate all the time (or allocate exponentially to cope with future growth). The allocators simply call new or malloc or OS-dependend function and yes there is potential to implement them more efficiently (memory pools etc). – Michael Chourdakis May 12 '19 at 14:52
1

std::realloc is never used unless the container knows that the objects are TriviallyCopiable.

Source: https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/memory/c/realloc

Because reallocation may involve bytewise copying (regardless of whether it's to expand or to contract), only the objects of TriviallyCopyable types are safe to access in the preserved part of the memory block after a call to realloc.

Some non-standard libraries define a type trait "BitwiseMovable" or "Relocatable", which describes a type that doesn't have:

If the container cannot know that the objects are trivially copiable, then using realloc to expand the memory might result in corrupted data.

If is_trivially_copiable can be used on the container, then yes, using realloc is possible. Otherwise it will led to undefined behaviour.

Otherwise, the container a) creates new memory, b) calls copy or move constructor of the elements to move them to new memory c) frees old memory.

  • 1
    Because in C, all types are trivially copiable. – Michael Chourdakis May 12 '19 at 15:04
  • 1
    Trivial copiability is not the only problem. The implementation would also have to know that the allocator gives a pointer from malloc. – eerorika May 12 '19 at 15:08
  • @eerorika, yes but the implementation family of functions would use the same class of functions (e.g. alloc from malloc, realloc from realloc() etc, or alloc from HeapAlloc and realloc from HeapReAlloc) - I Guess. – Michael Chourdakis May 12 '19 at 15:10
1

As far as I know, C++ does not support an operator like 'realloc(void *, size_t)'

C++ does have std::realloc. But it is not (typically?) used to implement resizing of vector.

Then how could it be done to resize the buffer of std::vector without 'realloc' function?

Using following algorithm:

  • allocate new array
  • copy or move contents to the new array
  • deallocate old array

Is it be done just by allocating new buffer, copy or move all elements and destructing previous buffer?

Yes.

I think it is inefficient.

Why do you think so? That's exactly what realloc does. Sure, realloc may sometimes be able to skip the copying depending on memory layout, which vector generally cannot. This is an unfortunate downside of vector compared to manually mallocated dynamic array, but it's not necessarily a significant downside.

There have been proposals to add reallocation support to standard allocators, which would allow the same optimisation if adopted into the standard: http://open-std.org/JTC1/SC22/WG21/docs/papers/2019/p0894r1.md

  • It moves the contents, it doesn't copy them (Calls move constructor if there). – Michael Chourdakis May 12 '19 at 14:51
  • 1
    @MichaelChourdakis it does one or the other depending on type of element. – eerorika May 12 '19 at 14:55
0

In case of a std::vector<bool> in theory there is nothing against the fact an equivalent of realloc is used internally, but looking at the implementation for g++ ( gcc version 6.3.0 20170516 / Raspbian ):

  template<typename _Alloc>
    void
    vector<bool, _Alloc>::
    _M_reallocate(size_type __n)
    {
      _Bit_pointer __q = this->_M_allocate(__n);
      iterator __start(std::__addressof(*__q), 0);
      this->_M_impl._M_finish = _M_copy_aligned(begin(), end(), __start);
      this->_M_deallocate();
      this->_M_impl._M_start = __start;
      this->_M_impl._M_end_of_storage = __q + _S_nword(__n);
    }

so it is based on a new allocation then copy then deallocation

  • 1
    Using realloc will fail, see my answer below. – Michael Chourdakis May 12 '19 at 15:02
  • @MichaelChourdakis notice my answer is about vector of bool, and I suppose bool is TriviallyCopyable no ;-) ? – bruno May 12 '19 at 15:05
  • Yes, if the type is some POD it will work. But usually it's not the case. – Michael Chourdakis May 12 '19 at 15:06
  • @MichaelChourdakis so this is the case here and "In theory there is nothing against the fact an equivalent of realloc is used internally" is not wrong, anyway you DV my answer (I suppose is you) – bruno May 12 '19 at 15:13
  • The OP did not confine his container to bool, so anyone that sees it might assume it is safe everywhere - remember that lots of newbies in C++ would read your answer as a man with high reputation. – Michael Chourdakis May 12 '19 at 15:14
-1

std::vector has a resize function that allows you to expand or compact the array as needed. If a reallocation does occur, it copy/moves the elements to the new allocation automatically. This is a reason why iterators can become invalid.

  • 2
    and the question is about that, or equivalent (push_back ...) – bruno May 12 '19 at 15:14
  • I do not DV but I do not understand the reason of your answer (even it is not false :-) ) – bruno May 12 '19 at 15:22
  • @bruno. Interesting. It looks to me like the Op is trying to figure out how to resize a vector manually. How do you interpret the question? – EvilTeach May 12 '19 at 21:55
  • The question is about the implementation of vector::resize, not how to use vector operations to resize one – bruno May 12 '19 at 21:58

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.