-3

There are a couple of maze questions similar to this one but none of them ever really go into the why it won't work.

I don't need precise answers. I just need to know why this particular thing doesn't work.

This is the bit of my class Maze that I need help with.

  • ysize in my example is 10
  • xsize is 10
  • xend is 20 (changing it to 19 messes with the results and doesn't draw anything)
  • yend is 10 (changing it to 9 does this too)
class Maze:
    def __init__(self):
        self.maze = []
        self.xstart = None
        self.ystart = None
        self.xend = None
        self.yend = None
        self.xsize = None
        self.ysize = None



    def read_maze(self, filename):
        maze_list = []

        f_maze = open(filename)

        size = f_maze.readline().split()                # 
        start = f_maze.readline().split()               # 
        end = f_maze.readline().split()                 # 

        self.xstart = int(start[1])
        self.ystart = int(start[0])

        self.xend = (int(end[1])*2)
        self.yend = (int(end[0])*2)


        self.xsize = (int(size[1])*2)
        self.ysize = (int(size[0])*2)

        lines = f_maze.readlines()

        for line in lines:
            maze_list.append(list(line[:len(line)]))

        self.maze = maze_list                           # Assigns to class

    def __str__(self):
        return ("".join(''.join(line) for line in self.maze))
    def solve(self, x, y):        

        if y > (self.ysize) or x > (self.xsize):
            print("1")
            return False

        if self.maze[y][x] == self.maze[self.yend][self.xend]:
            print("2")
            return True 

        if self.maze[y][x] != " ":
            print("3")
            return False

        self.maze[y][x] = "o" # MARKING WITH o for path already taken.

        if self.solve(x+1,y) == True:  

            return True
        elif self.solve(x,y+1) == True: 

            return True
        elif self.solve(x-1,y) == True:

            return True
        elif self.solve(x,y-1) == True: 

            return True

        self.maze[y][x] = " " # ELSE I want it to be replaced with space

        return False

This is the current result.

 ---------------------
 |ooooooooooooo| |   |
 |-+-+-+ +-+-+o+ + +-|
 |   |   |   |o|     |
 | +-+-+ + +-+-+-+ + |
 |       | | |     | |
 |-+-+ + + + +-+ +-+-|
 |     |             |
 |-+ +-+-+-+-+-+ +-+ |
 |     |         |   |
 ---------------------

I want it like this:

---------------------
|ooooooo      | |   |
|-+-+-+o+-+-+ + + +-|
|   |  o|   | |     |
| +-+-+o+ +-+-+-+ + |
|      o| | |     | |
|-+-+ +o+ + +-+ +-+-|
|     |ooooooooooooo|
|-+ +-+-+-+-+-+ +-+o|
|     |         |  o|
---------------------

I don't know how to fix the indentation format here I apologize. That is my whole code. These are my test statements:

maze = Maze()
maze.read_maze(filename)
maze.solve(maze.xstart, maze.ystart)
print(maze)

The files go in this format saved as .txt files.

 5 10
 1 1
 5 10
 ---------------------
 |             | |   |
 |-+-+-+ +-+-+ + + +-|
 |   |   |   | |     |
 | +-+-+ + +-+-+-+ + |
 |       | | |     | |
 |-+-+ + + + +-+ +-+-|
 |     |             |
 |-+ +-+-+-+-+-+ +-+ |
 |     |         |   |
 ---------------------
3
  • 2
    The function looks OK to me. The boundary sizes seem suspicious since it looks like many more os are drawn than 10x10. Can you post a minimal reproducible example that reproduces the problem? – ggorlen May 13 '19 at 0:06
  • 2
    This still isn't a MCVE. I should be able to copy and paste the code, click "run" and see the problem you're seeing. What does the file look like? – ggorlen May 13 '19 at 0:17
  • 2
    Please don't vandalize your question. Improve yes, but vandalize no, as you'll make all answers invalid. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels May 13 '19 at 0:56
1

The problem is that as your file stands, xend, yend is (10, 20). To debug why it's not working, you can print(self.maze[self.yend][self.xend]) which returns a dash "-". Now, when your recursive call's (x, y) pair reaches its first dash, it tests True for the line

if self.maze[y][x] == self.maze[self.yend][self.xend]:

and thinks it has solved the maze. Rather, we want to test

if (y, x) == (self.yend, self.xend):

That is, test the coordinates, not the value of the square.

Another point: examining the actual location of the goal, we see that it's here:

+-+ +-+ |
    |   |
--------- <= this corner is the goal!

Which is unreachable if moving in strictly cardinal directions. Moving the goal a square up or to the left would put it within bounds of the solver algorithm.

This was sufficient to get the code working for me and hopefully is enough to get you moving again.

0

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