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I have a little trouble to understand the return of a selected array in my dictionary. Hope you can provide me with an explanation. The language is javascript by the way.

I created a dictionary with some arrays as value. When selecting the value with the correct key, my output is an array containing my array value. I was expecting to have directly my array value.

Edit : the creation of the dictionary seems to be the problem. Supposing the two dictionary are the same. Here a screenshot of the log: chromelog

var dictionary1 = {"key1" : ["element10","element11"], "key2":["element20","element21"]};

$.each($(".select-filters"),function(i,v) { //select all filters 
        if (dic_results[$(this).attr("name")] == null) { // if the list don't exist create it
            dic_results[$(this).attr("name")] = []
        }
        dic_results[$(this).attr("name")].push($(this).val()); //push the value inside the array
    });

console.log(dictionary["key1"]); //return the correct value ["element10",element11"]

console.log(dic_results["key1"]);//return [Array(1)] expecting ["element10",element11"]
console.log(dic_results["key1"][0]);//return ["element10",element11"]
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  • @trincot it's still very odd - I'd expect an error if key1 was not defined. Or if it was, then I wouldn't expect it to return Array(1). I think OP is missing some information here.
    – VLAZ
    May 13, 2019 at 11:35
  • 2
    What is the value of key1? Not sure how dictionary[key1] can return [["element10",element11"]]? This is not a minimal reproducible example
    – adiga
    May 13, 2019 at 11:40
  • Does dictionary have some kind of getter like this: Object.defineProperty(dictionary, <key1's value here>, { get() { return [this["key1"]] } })
    – adiga
    May 13, 2019 at 11:52
  • 1
    You are probably using the wrong this inside the callback. Don't remember much jquery but try using $(".select-filters").each(..).
    – adiga
    May 13, 2019 at 12:00
  • 1
    Wait, is this it? Do you have a multi select in your HTML?
    – VLAZ
    May 13, 2019 at 12:29

4 Answers 4

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If you have a multi select element in your HTML, then you would get this because $(this.val()) will return an array of all selected options:

var dic_results = {};
$.each($(".select-filters"), function(i, v) { //select all filters 
  if (dic_results[$(this).attr("name")] == null) { // if the list don't exist create it
    dic_results[$(this).attr("name")] = []
  }
  dic_results[$(this).attr("name")].push($(this).val()); //push the value inside the array
});

console.log(dic_results["key1"]); //return [Array(1)] expecting ["element10",element11"]
console.log(dic_results["key1"][0]); //return ["element10",element11"]
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/jquery/3.3.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<select class="select-filters" name="key1" multiple>
  <option value="element10" selected>10</option>
  <option value="element11" selected>11</option>
  <option value="element12">12</option>
</select>

Since you don't want an array in array, you can simply add each element of the result to the array using spread syntax ...:

var dic_results = {};
$.each($(".select-filters"), function(i, v) {
  if (dic_results[$(this).attr("name")] == null) {
    dic_results[$(this).attr("name")] = []
  }
  dic_results[$(this).attr("name")].push(...$(this).val());
});

console.log(dic_results["key1"]); //returns ["element10",element11"]
console.log(dic_results["key1"][0]); //returns "element10"
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/jquery/3.3.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<select class="select-filters" name="key1" multiple>
  <option value="element10" selected>10</option>
  <option value="element11" selected>11</option>
  <option value="element12">12</option>
</select>

Or if you don't want to use ES6, here is how you can do the same in ES5 using Function#apply on the Array#push:

var dic_results = {};
$.each($(".select-filters"), function(i, v) {
  if (dic_results[$(this).attr("name")] == null) {
    dic_results[$(this).attr("name")] = []
  }
  //make a local variable for convenience because we have to repeat it
  var arr = dic_results[$(this).attr("name")];
  arr.push.apply(arr, $(this).val());
});

console.log(dic_results["key1"]); //returns ["element10",element11"]
console.log(dic_results["key1"][0]); //returns "element10"
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/jquery/3.3.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<select class="select-filters" name="key1" multiple>
  <option value="element10" selected>10</option>
  <option value="element11" selected>11</option>
  <option value="element12">12</option>
</select>

However, if you have a mix of multi selects and other form elements, you can have a problem because a single item will be treated like an entire array and for strings, that means you'd get an array containing each individual character:

var dic_results = {};
$.each($(".select-filters"), function(i, v) {
  if (dic_results[$(this).attr("name")] == null) {
    dic_results[$(this).attr("name")] = []
  }
  dic_results[$(this).attr("name")].push(...$(this).val());
});

console.log(dic_results); 
console.log(dic_results["key1"]); //returns ["element10", "element11"]
console.log(dic_results["key2"]); //returns ["e", "l", "e", "m", "e", "n", "t", "2", "0"]
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/jquery/3.3.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

<select class="select-filters" name="key1" multiple>
  <option value="element10" selected>10</option>
  <option value="element11" selected>11</option>
  <option value="element12">12</option>
</select>

<input type="text" class="select-filters" name="key2" value="element20" />

So, if you want to handle both cases, you can use Array#concat() - if given an item, it will make a new array that includes it, if given an array, it will join it to the current one. This works in both ES6 and ES5:

var dic_results = {};
$.each($(".select-filters"), function(i, v) {
  if (dic_results[$(this).attr("name")] == null) {
    dic_results[$(this).attr("name")] = []
  }
  
  dic_results[$(this).attr("name")] = dic_results[$(this).attr("name")]
    .concat($(this).val());
});

console.log(dic_results); 
console.log(dic_results["key1"]); //returns ["element10", "element11"]
console.log(dic_results["key2"]); //returns ["element20"]
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/jquery/3.3.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

<select class="select-filters" name="key1" multiple>
  <option value="element10" selected>10</option>
  <option value="element11" selected>11</option>
  <option value="element12">12</option>
</select>

<input type="text" class="select-filters" name="key2" value="element20" />

It's a little verbose, but you can shorten the repetition using a local variable:

var dic_results = {};
$.each($(".select-filters"), function(i, v) {
  var key = $(this).attr("name");
  if (dic_results[key] == null) {
    dic_results[key] = []
  }
  
  dic_results[key] = dic_results[key]
    .concat($(this).val());
});

console.log(dic_results); 
console.log(dic_results["key1"]); //returns ["element10", "element11"]
console.log(dic_results["key2"]); //returns ["element20"]
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/jquery/3.3.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

<select class="select-filters" name="key1" multiple>
  <option value="element10" selected>10</option>
  <option value="element11" selected>11</option>
  <option value="element12">12</option>
</select>

<input type="text" class="select-filters" name="key2" value="element20" />

2
  • Thanks @vlaz for the explanation. It seems the multiple select was the explanation of my array in the array. Quite strange regarding the output of the console log. But at least now I understand.
    – Blafarus
    May 13, 2019 at 13:19
  • @Blafarus how data is shown in the console can vary. Whatever is used in stack snippets in particular shows data formatted a bit differently from what a browser would show you. At any rate, the console.log would give you something that will represent your data - if you have [[1, 2], [4, 5, 6]], it's valid for the console to show you that or change it to [Array(2), Array(3)] - both are correct in what they represent. So, yes, consoles can get a bit annoying if what they show you is correct but different to what a different view shows you.
    – VLAZ
    May 13, 2019 at 13:46
2

You need to use string as a key like this:

var dictionary = {"key1" : ["element10","element11"], "key2":["element20","element21"]};
console.log(dictionary["key1"]); //returns ["element10",element11"]
console.log(dictionary["key1"][0]); //returns the correct value "element10"

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the "key1" is a variable? It is not a string.

var dictionary = {"key1" : ["element10","element11"], "key2":["element20","element21"]};
console.log(dictionary["key1"]);
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You are using Bracket Notation. You need to write an expression inside []. So key1 inside [] will refer to the variable with name `key1.

You should use a string "key1"

var dictionary = {"key1" : ["element10","element11"], "key2":["element20","element21"]};
console.log(dictionary['key1'][0]);

When the name of the property is known then better to use Dot Notation.

var dictionary = {"key1" : ["element10","element11"], "key2":["element20","element21"]};
console.log(dictionary.key1[0]);

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