0

While working with class templates, is there a way to specify a particular size by inferring from its type? Here is a pseudo code example to represent what I'm trying to ask.

#include <bitset>
#include <cstdint>

namespace xxx {

#define BYTE  8
#define WORD  16
#define DWORD 32
#define QWORD 64

    typedef std::uint8_t   u8;
    typedef std::uint16_t u16;
    typedef std::uint32_t u32;
    typedef std::uint64_t u64;

    template<typename Type, u16 BitCount>
    struct Register {
    };
}

I don't know if I can use partial specialization or full specialization, and I don't know how to go about doing this. What I would like to do is the following:

  • if Type == u8 then BitCount automatically == BYTE or 8
  • if Type == u16 then BitCount automatically == WORD or 16
  • if Type == u32 then BitCount automatically == DWORD or 32
  • if Type == u64 then BitCount automatically == QWORD or 64

The reasoning for this is that when it comes to the class above with its members which I haven't shown yet but will show here is that one of its members is a std::bitset

template<typename Type, u16 BitCount>
struct Register {
   Type value;
   std::bitset<BitCount> 
};

Yes I know that I can instantiate them like this:

void someFunc() {
    Register<u8, 8> r8;
    Register<u16, 16> r16;
}

But I would like to be able to possibly specialize them so that you don't have to pass in any argument types, I was hoping that they could be deduced by the parameter types that are passed in or, if one just passes the type, then the size part is automatic. This would be preferred

void someFunc() {
    Register<u8> r8;
} 

// the class would automatically use `8` for its `std::bitset<8>` member.

There will always be a one to one correspondence of its underlying type and the size in bits.

This kind of instantiation is invalid:

Register<u32, 64> reg; // invalid type u32 can only be 32...

Is there any known way of doing this through specialization, inheritance, polymorphism, etc.?

  • Is there something wrong with sizeof? – n. 'pronouns' m. May 13 at 15:48
  • Why do you want to have the amount of bits as a template parameter? Can't you have something like static constexpr u16 BitCount = CHAR_BIT * sizeof(Type); instead? – HolyBlackCat May 13 at 15:48
  • @HolyBlackCat std::bitset<8> would be a member of Register<u8> and std::bitset<16> would be a member of Register<u16> and so on... These bitset members are initialized by the T value` member. – Francis Cugler May 13 at 15:49
  • So? You can do std::bitset<BitCount> foo; if BitCount is a static constexpr variable. You can even do std::bitset<CHAR_BIT * sizeof(Type)> foo; directly. – HolyBlackCat May 13 at 15:51
4

It sounds like you don't actually want a second template parameter. You just want one template parameter, and just determine the number of bits directly from it:

template <typename Type>
struct Register {
    static constexpr auto Bits = sizeof(Type) * CHAR_BIT;
    // ...
};

Or if you want to generalize that logic somewhat:

template <typename> struct BitCount;
template <> struct BitCount<uint8_t>  : integral_constant<size_t, 8> {};
template <> struct BitCount<uint16_t> : integral_constant<size_t, 16> {};
// ...

template <typename Type>
struct Register {
    static constexpr auto Bits = BitCount<T>::value;
    // ...
};
5

You could just use usings:

using u8Register = Register<u8, BYTE>;
using u16Register = Register<u16, WORD>;
using u32Register = Register<u32, DWORD>;
using u64Register = Register<u64, QWORD>;

Or, if these types will be one on one with their bytesize you could use sizeof:

#include <limits.h>
template<typename Type, u16 BitCount = sizeof(Type) * CHAR_BIT>
struct Register {
   Type value;
   std::bitset<BitCount> 
};

Or you could inherit from Register to specialize.

  • sizeof() wont work in this case because it returns how many bytes of a type and not how many bits. – Francis Cugler May 13 at 15:50
  • @FrancisCugler Edited. – Sombrero Chicken May 13 at 15:51
  • @Ah okay that looks better. The using maybe okay but I kind of like the 2nd one with the defaulted template argument. I just could figure out how to generate a compile time const value for the std::bitset<> argument. – Francis Cugler May 13 at 15:53
  • "how many bytes of a type and not how many bits." Since ancient egyptians invented multiplication it's not an unsurmountable problem. The mumber of bits in a byte is known. – n. 'pronouns' m. May 13 at 15:56
  • 2
    I'm having hard time figuring out what you mean. sizeof(type) * CHAR_BIT is the size of the type in bits. It's a constexpr so you can use it as a template argument. That's all there is. – n. 'pronouns' m. May 13 at 16:18
-1

To solve my issue; they both gave similar answers on this but I think Barry's is more expressive so I'll have to give him the credit for his answer.

Now as for Sombrero he did help me with the using Reg# = Register<T> so I don't have to call these templates by passing in their type arguments.

And it basically came down to this:

static constexpr auto Bits = sizeof(Type) * CHAR_BIT;

I want to thank you for those who provided me with this help.


Using the feedback from users: Barry and SombreroChicken I was able to do this:

main.cpp

#include <iostream>
#include "Register.h"

int main() {
using namespace vpc;

    u8  valA = 8;
    u16 valB = 16;
    u32 valC = 32;
    u64 valD = 64;

    Reg8 r8A(valA);
    Reg8 r8B(valB);
    Reg8 r8C(valC);
    Reg8 r8D(valD);

    Reg16 r16A(valA);
    Reg16 r16B(valB);
    Reg16 r16C(valC);
    Reg16 r16D(valD);

    Reg32 r32A(valA);
    Reg32 r32B(valB);
    Reg32 r32C(valC);
    Reg32 r32D(valD);

    Reg64 r64A(valA);
    Reg64 r64B(valB);
    Reg64 r64C(valC);
    Reg64 r64D(valD);

    std::cout << r8A << r8B << r8C << r8D;
    std::cout << r16A << r16B << r16C << r16D;
    std::cout << r32A << r32B << r32C << r32D;
    std::cout << r64A << r64B << r64C << r64D;

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Output

Reg8(8)
hex: 0x08
bin: 00001000

Reg8(16)
hex: 0x10
bin: 00010000

Reg8(32)
hex: 0x20
bin: 00100000

Reg8(64)
hex: 0x40
bin: 01000000

Reg16(8)
hex: 0x0008
bin: 0000000000001000

Reg16(16)
hex: 0x0010
bin: 0000000000010000

Reg16(32)
hex: 0x0020
bin: 0000000000100000

Reg16(64)
hex: 0x0040
bin: 0000000001000000

Reg32(8)
hex: 0x00000008
bin: 00000000000000000000000000001000

Reg32(16)
hex: 0x00000010
bin: 00000000000000000000000000010000

Reg32(32)
hex: 0x00000020
bin: 00000000000000000000000000100000

Reg32(64)
hex: 0x00000040
bin: 00000000000000000000000001000000

Reg64(8)
hex: 0x0000000000000008
bin: 0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000001000

Reg64(16)
hex: 0x0000000000000010
bin: 0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000010000

Reg64(32)
hex: 0x0000000000000020
bin: 0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000100000

Reg64(64)
hex: 0x0000000000000040
bin: 0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000001000000

Register.h

#pragma once

#include <algorithm>
#include <bitset>

#include <string>
#include <vector> // include for typedefs below.

namespace vpc {
    typedef std::int8_t  i8;
    typedef std::int16_t i16;
    typedef std::int32_t i32;
    typedef std::int64_t i64;

    typedef std::uint8_t u8;
    typedef std::uint16_t u16;
    typedef std::uint32_t u32;
    typedef std::uint64_t u64;

    const u16 BYTE = 0x08;
    const u16 WORD = 0x10;
    const u16 DWORD = 0x20;
    const u16 QWORD = 0x40;

    typedef std::bitset<BYTE>  Byte;
    typedef std::bitset<WORD>  Word;
    typedef std::bitset<DWORD> DWord;
    typedef std::bitset<QWORD> QWord;

    template<typename Ty>
    struct Register_t {
        static constexpr u16 BitCount = sizeof(Ty) * CHAR_BIT;
        Ty currentValue;
        Ty previousValue;
        std::bitset<BitCount> bits;

        Register_t() : currentValue{ 0 }, previousValue{ 0 }, bits{ 0 }{}

        template<typename U>
        explicit Register_t(U val) : currentValue{ static_cast<Ty>(val) }, previousValue{ 0 }, bits{ currentValue } {}
    };

    template<typename Ty>
    struct Register : public Register_t<Ty> {
        Register() = default;
        explicit Register(Ty val) : Register_t<Ty>( val ) {}
    };

    using Reg8  = Register<u8>;
    using Reg16 = Register<u16>;
    using Reg32 = Register<u32>;
    using Reg64 = Register<u64>;

    std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const Reg8&  reg);
    std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const Reg16& reg);
    std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const Reg32& reg);
    std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const Reg64& reg);

} // namespace vpc

Register.cpp

#include "Register.h"

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>

namespace vpc {

    std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const Reg8& r) {
        os << "Reg8(" << +r.currentValue << ")\n"
            << "hex: " << "0x" << std::uppercase
            << std::setfill('0') << std::setw(2) << std::hex
            << +r.currentValue << std::dec << '\n'
            << "bin: " << r.bits << '\n' << std::endl;
        return  os;
    }
    std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const Reg16& r) {
        os << "Reg16(" << r.currentValue << ")\n"
            << "hex: " << "0x" << std::uppercase
            << std::setfill('0') << std::setw(4) << std::hex
            << r.currentValue << std::dec << '\n'
            << "bin: " << r.bits << '\n' << std::endl;
        return  os;
    }
    std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const Reg32& r) {
        os << "Reg32(" << r.currentValue << ")\n"
            << "hex: " << "0x" << std::uppercase
            << std::setfill('0') << std::setw(8) << std::hex
            << r.currentValue << std::dec << '\n'
            << "bin: " << r.bits << '\n' << std::endl;
        return  os;
    }
    std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const Reg64& r) {
        os << "Reg64(" << r.currentValue << ")\n"
            << "hex: " << "0x" << std::uppercase
            << std::setfill('0') << std::setw(16) << std::hex
            << r.currentValue << std::dec << '\n'
            << "bin: " << r.bits << '\n' << std::endl;
        return  os;
    }

} // namespace vpc

And this is what I am looking for.

  • 1
    Basically all this code boils down to deciding to use static variables, as Barry suggested. I'd accept his answer. – HolyBlackCat May 13 at 17:12
  • @HolyBlackCat Basically yeah; I was starring at code and numbers for many hours... and for the life of me something this simple which I probably already knew but couldn't think of it had me stumped... – Francis Cugler May 13 at 17:14
  • @HolyBlackCat these are only just the "Basic Constructors". I have more constructors in my unit test project where I have 4 individual classes that are non template non inherited. I'm just trying to remove a lot of the code duplication. I have constructors that will take not just values, but any of the 4 other types of registers. I also have constructors that will take a larger type value, or larger type register with in index value that will retrieve a subsection of the bit pattern and construct the new register with that value. – Francis Cugler May 13 at 17:26
  • why are you waffling between typedef and using? – Ryan Haining May 14 at 20:30
  • @RyanHaining Does it really matter? – Francis Cugler May 14 at 20:42

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.