4

I have such a trivial issue but I am having a hard time getting my code to properly wait for an object before moving on.

I have the following config set for my driver

session.Manage().Timeouts().ImplicitWait = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(60);

I was expecting this to mean that it would wait a minimum of 60 seconds before throwing errors related to element identification such as

Message: System.InvalidOperationException : An element could not be located on the page using the given search parameters.

However this is not the case. I get the error around 2 seconds in when trying to call the following command.

WindowsElement btn = session.FindElementByXPath("//Button[@Name='NEXT']");
btn.Click();

The error gets thrown on the line where I am just defining the buttons properties and not on the actual Click() method. Am I not passing the elements properties correctly? Why would the instantiation of the button also do the searching of it?

4

There it a open issue on the winappdriver github. Take a look at this comment about it. It seems to be a Appium issue. I have no idea about the status of this issue.

Basically, this means you will have to resort to a workaround. Using Thread.Sleep(/*milliseconds*/) is a bad idea.

I implemented a while loop in a function to get a control by Automation ID like this:

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets a UI element based on a AutomationId.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="automationId">The AutomationId is a unique value that can be found with UI inspector tools.</param>
    /// <param name="controlName">The name of the UI element.</param>
    /// <param name="timeOut">TimeOut in milliseconds</param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    protected WindowsElement GetElement(string automationId, string controlName, int timeOut = 10000)
    {
        bool iterate = true;
        WindowsElement control = null;
        _elementTimeOut = TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(timeOut);
        timer.Start();

        while (timer.Elapsed <= _elementTimeOut && iterate == true)
        {
            try
            {
                control = Driver.FindElementByAccessibilityId(automationId);
                iterate = false;
            }
            catch (WebDriverException ex)
            {
                LogSearchError(ex, automationId, controlName);
            }
        }

        timer.Stop();
        Assert.IsFalse(timer.Elapsed > _elementTimeOut, "Timeout Elapsed, element not found.");
        timer.Reset();

        return control;
    }

Using a loop has some advantages versus Thread.Sleep(), it's more flexible and you have much more options than simply blocking the code execution.

A few of the advantages:

  • Your test script keeps executing: Imagine your script pausing for 5 seconds while the application under test keeps going. A lot could happen in those 5 seconds your script might want to know about. But it can't, because the code execution is blocked if you use 'Thread.Sleep()'.
  • Dynamic wait: A while loop will iterate until the condition is satisfied. This makes your script continue with the test as soon as this condition is met, thus making your script run faster. E.g. you are waiting for a page to load. Thread.Sleep(5000) will assume it's OK to continue, while the loop knows it's OK to continue the test.
  • With the timer/time out combo, you can check how long the operation took (e.g. save some edits) and if it took longer than the timeout, you know it's not OK to continue.

Alternately, this code will work just as well:

protected WindowsElement GetElement(string automationId, string propertyName, int timeOut = 10000)
{
    WindowsElement element = null;
    var wait = new DefaultWait<WindowsDriver<WindowsElement>>(Driver)
    {
        Timeout = TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(timeOut),
        Message = $"Element with automationId \"{automationId}\" not found."
    };

    wait.IgnoreExceptionTypes(typeof(WebDriverException));

    try
    {
        wait.Until(Driver =>
        {
            element = Driver.FindElementByAccessibilityId(automationId);

            return element != null;
        });
    }
    catch(WebDriverTimeoutException ex)
    {
        LogSearchError(ex, automationId, propertyName);
        Assert.Fail(ex.Message);
    }

    return element;
}

Above code will only throw a WebDriverTimeoutException instead of continuously throwing NoSuchElementException. It does not use a while loop, but I suspect wait.Until(...) is doing something similar, since WinAppDriver polls the gui every 500ms (see the PollingInterval property on the DefaultWait object.

12
  • Thank you for posting this - I was afraid I would have to resort to something like this but your use of the timer is interesting. This is safer than just using a Sleep()?
    – Tree55Topz
    May 14 '19 at 13:34
  • Yes it's safer, because you have more control. I updated my answer to address this. Please also see this blog post on sauce labs: saucelabs.com/blog/how-to-avoid-threadsleep-in-test-automation. 4 reasons given there.
    – PixelPlex
    May 14 '19 at 14:24
  • Take a look at this code snipet. This seems interesting because it won't throw element not found exceptions. That's always cheaper than throwing exceptions until the while condition is met :-). It also seems to be more configurable.
    – PixelPlex
    May 15 '19 at 9:50
  • The second solution is actually not working. The element just stays null and it doesnt seem to wait properly
    – Tree55Topz
    May 15 '19 at 18:20
  • 1
    Yes, I use the Stopwatch class. It's declared in a field outside the function, so it's easy to re-use in other functions inside that class. Just make sure you don't forget to reset it.
    – PixelPlex
    May 15 '19 at 21:25
0

I hope this helps:

public void WaitTillControlToDisplay(WindowsElement control , int Waittime=30)
{
    int startTime = 0;

    while (startTime < Waittime)
    {
        try
        {
            if (!control.Displayed)
                startTime += 1;
            else
            {
                Thread.Sleep(1000);
                return;
            }
        }
        catch (OpenQA.Selenium.WebDriverException)
        {
            Thread.Sleep(1000);
            return; // We should have Control loaded by now
        }

         Thread.Sleep(1000);
    }

    Assert.Fail("Time Out : Control - "+control+" Did not loaded within "+Waittime+" Seconds");

}

Here control should be identified before passing it to the method. Sometimes controls will be inside another container, so it’s better to identify it and pass it to the method.

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