40

Do we have support for C++20 ranges library in the newly released GCC 9?

I copied the example code below for ranges library from: https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/ranges

#include <vector>
#include <ranges>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
  std::vector<int> ints{0,1,2,3,4,5};
  auto even = [](int i){ return 0 == i % 2; };
  auto square = [](int i) { return i * i; };

  for (int i : ints | std::view::filter(even) | std::view::transform(square)) {
    std::cout << i << ' ';
  }
}

But when compiled with g++ 9.1 (Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver)), it complains that <ranges> cannot be found:

$ g++ -std=c++2a cpp2a.cpp 
cpp2a.cpp:2:10: fatal error: ranges: No such file or directory
    2 | #include <ranges>
      |          ^~~~~~~~
compilation terminated.

Am I missing something?

And will the ranges library arrive at some point of time with the GCC 9 series?

3
  • 6
    Completely unrelated mini rant: Why does C++ have to kill the elegance of all of the (otherwise simple) features it chooses to adopt? Between Ruby, Kotlin, Rust, Swift, Java, and C#, there's already so much good design on lambda and range syntax. This could have been something as nice as (0...5).select { |x| x % 2 == 0 }.map { |x| x*x }. std::adverb::There std::verb::are std::adjective::just std::adjective::too std::adjective::many std::noun::scopes.
    – Alexander
    May 13 '19 at 22:06
  • 6
    @Alexander: Well no, it could not have been anything like that. A library cannot extend the syntax of the language. Now, you can easily write using std::view::filter and then use filter without having to qualify it. In fact, it's recommended to do so, because fully-qualified names disable Koenig lookup.
    – Ben Voigt
    May 14 '19 at 0:40
  • 4
    @Alexander: The main point against your suggestion is that you propose a change to the language, whereas this is simply a new library. Also, bound methods are rather restrictive to the sorts of flexibility that C++ allows and C++ style regularly exploits: thus the overloaded operator model. And you can import individual names anyways.
    – user1084944
    May 14 '19 at 0:41
33

Am I missing something?

No.

And will the ranges library arrive at some point of time with the gcc-9 series?

It's possible but seems unlikely. This did not happen. The first release to support Ranges in gcc was gcc 10.1.


Ranges is an enormous library. It's still 2019, the official C++20 standard still won't even be shipped for another year and a half. It'll take a while for it to get implemented in the major standard library implementations. We'll just have to wait.

If you want to start using Ranges, you can use Range-v3 (specifically the v1.0-beta branch) or you can find an implementation of C++20 Ranges at cmcstl2 (this is Casey Mysterious Carter's implementation).

You can also periodically check cppreference's compiler/library tracking page (which at the time of writing shows no libraries having implemented the One Ranges proposal, but nevertheless does show quite a few C++20 features as having been implemented by the various library vendors).

1
  • 1
    It's also worth noting that ranges heavily rely on concepts that currently only exist in their TS incarnation in GCC.
    – Morwenn
    May 17 '19 at 11:35
14

Per Table 1.7. C++ 2020 Implementation Status

The One Ranges Proposal P0896R4

the version is 10.1. That means that you'll need to upgrade to at least that version to get the feature.

9

g++10 supports <ranges> feature along with a number of other c++20 features.

#include <vector>
#include <ranges>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
  std::vector<int> ints{0,1,2,3,4,5};
  auto even = [](int i){ return 0 == i % 2; };
  auto square = [](int i) { return i * i; };

  for (int i : ints | std::views::filter(even) | std::views::transform(square)) {
    std::cout << i << ' ';
  }
}

$ g++-10 -Wall -Wextra -std=c++20 ranges.cpp 
$ ./a.out 
0 4 16

On Ubuntu, the packages are now available. To install:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ubuntu-toolchain-r/test
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt install gcc-10 g++-10

However, g++-10 does not have support for all features. See the Table 1.8. C++ 2020 Library Features for features list supported.

4

GCC 10 has been released as stable in March (with a version update 10.1 on May 7, 2020).

This version supports ranges.

The compiler/library tracking page is up to date as well.

Thus your code sample* compiles: https://godbolt.org/z/MPxBMs

#include <vector>
#include <ranges>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
  std::vector<int> ints{0,1,2,3,4,5,6};
  auto even = [](int i){ return 0 == i % 2; };
  auto square = [](int i) { return i * i; };

  for (int i : ints | std::views::filter(even) | std::views::transform(square)) {
    std::cout << i << ' ';
  }
}

*: with a small fix, since the namespace alias is std::views not std::view.

I tested this with a local installation compiled by hand on macOS.

g++-10.1 -std=c++20 -Wall test.cpp
3
  • How did you get g++-10 on your Mac? Jun 16 '20 at 10:50
  • I did it by hand: to do so, you can read gcc.gnu.org/install .
    – Pascal H.
    Jun 17 '20 at 12:07
  • 1
    In my case, it was: download gcc sources and then mkdir build && cd build && ../configure --prefix=your_install_path --enable-checking=release --enable-languages=c,c++ --disable-multilib --with-sysroot=/Library/Developer/CommandLineTools/SDKs/MacOSX.sdk --program-suffix=-10.1 && make install . Wait ~30mn and it should be ready to use.
    – Pascal H.
    Jun 17 '20 at 12:08

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