1

I am writing unit tests but the part that confuses me most is whether it should test the functionality or not?

For example, if there is a method which does two things

  1. Deletes files from a folder
  2. Returns whether the folder is empty or not
public bool DeleteFTPFiles(string xyz)
{
    ...

    path = GetFTPPath(xyz);
    DeleteFolderFiles(path);
    return IsFtpFolderEmpty(path);
}

DeleteFolderFiles - deletes files based on some logic.

Now, if I have to do unit testing for this method(DeleteFTPFiles). Do I have to create folder structure and add some files through my unit tests as an Arrange test?

Assert whether files are deleted based on the condition?

Also, test if IsFtpFolderEmpty returns true or false based on whether it is empty or not?

If so, how is this different from Integration tests?

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  • 3
    While rather opinion based, That methods does too many things (SRP violation) and from the looks of things, is tightly coupled to implementation concerns that would make testing it in isolation difficult. The fact that you mention having to create actual folders/files shows that is an integration test as well. – Nkosi May 13 '19 at 23:49
3

For example, if there is a method which does two things

The method you've chosen to write DeleteFTPFiles() is a poor choice because the result does not match the name. If the file is not deleted, the method may still return true? That's faulty logic. If I used that code, I would assume the result is if the file was or wasn't deleted, not if the directory was empty.

If I were to write it, it would just be DeleteAllFiles(), because it doesn't need to know where it happening, just that it is. I would then pass in another class that is has the method necessary to do the work.

public class MySpaceManager()
{
  private readonly IFileManager _fileManager;
  public MySpaceManager(IFileManager fileManager)
  {
    _fileManager = fileManager;
  }


  public bool TryDeleteAllFiles1(logicalDirectory)
  {
    var files = _fileManager.GetFiles(logicalDirectory);
    var result = true;
    foreach(var file in files)
      result = result && _fileManager.Delete(file);

    return result;
  }

  // or maybe

  public bool TryDeleteAllFiles2(logicalDirectory)
  {
    var files = _fileManager.GetFiles(logicalDirectory);
    foreach(var file in files)
      _fileManager.Delete(file);

    var result = _fileManager.GetFiles(logicalDirectory).Count() == 0;
    return result;
  }

}

Should unit tests tests the functionality of a method?

Here is my explanation:

A unit-test should only test what it's meant to encapsulate. This may include one or more of the following (not necessarily an exhaustive list):

  1. Runs to Completion
  2. Throws an Exception
  3. Some type of logic (eg. AddTwoNumber() does indeed do that logic)
  4. Executes some external dependency
  5. Does not execute some external dependency

Lets take this hypothetical class and break down what and why each is tested:

public class MySpaceManagerTests
{
  // First simple, best good path for code
  public void TryDeleteAllFiles2_WithEmptyPath_ThrowsNoException()
  {
    /// ** ASSIGN **

    // I'm using NSubstitute here just for an example
    // could use Moq or RhinoMocks, whatever doesn't  
    // really matter in this instance
    // the important part is that we do NOT test dependencies
    // the class relies on.
    var fileManager = Substitute.For<IFileManager>();
    fileManager
      .GetFiles(Args.Any<string>())
      .Returns(new List<IFile>());

    var mySpaceManager = new MySpaceManager(fileManager);

    // ** ACT && ASSERT**

    // we know that the argument doesn't matter so we don't need it to be
    // anything at all, we just want to make sure that it runs to completion
    Asser.DoesNotThrow(() => mySpaceManager.TryDeleteAllFiles2(string.Empty);
  }

  // This looks VERY similar to the first test but
  // because the assert is different we need to write a different
  // test.  Each test should only really assert the name of the test
  // as it makes it easier to debug and fix it when it only tests
  // one thing.
  public void TryDeleteAllFiles2_WithEmptyPath_CallsFileManagerGetFiles()
  {
    /// ** ASSIGN **
    var fileManager = Substitute.For<IFileManager>();
    fileManager
      .GetFiles(Args.Any<string>())
      .Returns(new List<IFile>());

    var mySpaceManager = new MySpaceManager(fileManager);

    // ** ACT **
    mySpaceManager.TryDeleteAllFiles2(string.Empty)

    // ** ASSERT **
    Assert.DoesNotThrow(fileManager.Received().GetFiles());
  }

  public void TryDeleteAllFiles2_With0Files_DoesNotCallDeleteFile
  {
    /// ** ASSIGN **
    var fileManager = Substitute.For<IFileManager>();
    fileManager
      .GetFiles(Args.Any<string>())
      .Returns(new List<IFile> { Substitute.For<IFile>(); });

    var mySpaceManager = new MySpaceManager(fileManager);

    // ** ACT **
    mySpaceManager.TryDeleteAllFiles2(string.Empty)

    // ** ASSERT **
    Assert.DoesNotThrow(fileManager.DidNotReceive().GetFiles());
  }

  public void TryDeleteAllFiles2_With1File_CallsFileManagerDeleteFile
  {
    // etc
  }

  public void TryDeleteAllFiles2_With1FileDeleted_ReturnsTrue()
  {
    /// ** ASSIGN **
    var fileManager = Substitute.For<IFileManager>();
    fileManager
      .GetFiles(Args.Any<string>())
      .Returns(new List<IFile> { Substitute.For<IFile>(); }, 
        new list<IFile>());

    var mySpaceManager = new MySpaceManager(fileManager);

    // ** ACT **
    var actual = mySpaceManager.TryDeleteAllFiles2(string.Empty)

    // ** ASSERT **
    Assert.That(actual, Is.True);
  }

  public void TryDeleteAllFiles2_With1FileNotDeleted_ReturnsFalse()
  {
    /// ** ASSIGN **
    var fileManager = Substitute.For<IFileManager>();
    fileManager
      .GetFiles(Args.Any<string>())
      .Returns(new List<IFile> { Substitute.For<IFile>(); }, 
        new List<IFile> { Substitute.For<IFile>(); });

    var mySpaceManager = new MySpaceManager(fileManager);

    // ** ACT **
    var actual = mySpaceManager.TryDeleteAllFiles2(string.Empty)

    // ** ASSERT **
    Assert.That(actual, Is.False);
  }
}
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  • 1
    I thought I replied to this post. Thank you very much with providing the list and also the examples. This is the comprehensive response. Up! – Kar May 14 '19 at 17:18
1

Unit-test may test this code but it should be written a little another way.

Looking at this code rather make sense to talk about integration tests not unit-tests.

To have ability to write unit-test need to decouple your code from concrete implementations. You want test your code not FTP-service, is'n it?

To make code testable need to refactor your code following these steps:

Introduce the IFileStorage-abstraction:

public interface IFileStorage
{
    string GetPath(string smth);
    void DeleteFolder(string name);
    bool IsFolderEmpty(string path);    
}

public sealed class FtpFileStorage : IFileStorage
{
    public string GetPath(string smth) { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
    public void DeleteFolder(string name) { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
    public bool IsFolderEmpty(string path) { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
}

Code should depend from abstractions not concrete implementations:

public class SmthLikeServiceOrManager
{
    private readonly IFileStorage _fileStorage;

    public SmthLikeServiceOrManager(IFileStorage fileStorage)
    {
        _fileStorage = fileStorage;
    }    

    public bool DeleteFiles(string xyz)
    {
        // ...

        var path = _fileStorage.GetPath(xyz);
        _fileStorage.DeleteFolder(path);
        return _fileStorage.IsFolderEmpty(path);
    }
}

Now you can write real unit-test using one of the mocking libraries such as

Related articles on StackOverflow:

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  • thanks @vladmir. Given the above code, when you are unit-testing DeleteFTPFiles, will you write some code in the unit tests to create folders locally for testing? – Kar May 14 '19 at 0:28
  • It should not be created any 'physical' artefacts (such as folder or files) instead of this need to use one of mock-libraries to create fake storage that will have strongly defined behaviour needed for concrete unit-test. I would recommend to look at some quick starts doc like this Intro to Mocking with Moq. Ideally would be pass the course on Pluralsight/Youtube or somewhere, it doesn't take many time ;) – vladimir May 14 '19 at 0:42
  • thanks for the explanation. We had a discussion about this and I was of the opinion that we shouldnt create any folder or shouldnt cross the boundary. So wanted to get opinions here. This definitely helps. – Kar May 14 '19 at 1:24
  • @Kar - welcome, glad to help you. – vladimir May 14 '19 at 1:36

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