877

How can I convert a JavaScript object into a string?

Example:

var o = {a:1, b:2}
console.log(o)
console.log('Item: ' + o)

Output:

Object { a=1, b=2} // very nice readable output :)
Item: [object Object] // no idea what's inside :(

  • 7
    Convert to string to what purpose? You mean serialize so you can build the object later from the string? Or just for display? – Shadow Wizard Apr 10 '11 at 15:40
  • 19
    The author is gone from years, but reading in mind, after years, I guess, the entry point for the problem was the console.log(obj), which display object with properties, while console.log('obj: '+obj) works disorientingly otherwise. – Danubian Sailor Oct 16 '13 at 13:45
  • 2
    simply can't apply add two object, If we can do so there would be no diff in value type and ref type. – Nishant Kumar Jun 8 '14 at 11:41
  • 12
    var o = {a:1, b:2}; console.log('Item: ' + JSON.stringify(o)) – Nishant Kumar Jun 8 '14 at 11:50
  • 21
    If it's for the console, I would recommend doing console.log("Item", obj);. No need for anything complicated. – soktinpk Nov 18 '14 at 23:55

32 Answers 32

1242

I would recommend using JSON.stringify, which converts the set of the variables in the object to a JSON string. Most modern browsers support this method natively, but for those that don't, you can include a JS version:

var obj = {
  name: 'myObj'
};

JSON.stringify(obj);
  • 6
    For reference IE6 and 7 do not support this. IE6 isn't that big a deal because of very few users, and an active campaign to kill it ... but there are still quite a few IE7 users out there (depends on your user base). – MikeMurko Nov 21 '11 at 14:35
  • 27
    I get an "Uncaught TypeError: Converting circular structure to JSON". Even if there is a circular reference, i would still like to see a string-representation of my object. What can I do? – Pascal Klein Mar 21 '12 at 16:24
  • 21
    This doesn't work if the object has a function property, eg: foo: function () {...}. – Brock Adams Sep 29 '12 at 14:54
  • 2
    Link to JSON library doesn't work if clicked from StackOverflow. Copy and paste it in the address bar. – f.ardelian Nov 3 '12 at 12:48
  • 1
    Link to CDN cdnjs.com/libraries/json2 – zkent Jan 24 '14 at 8:04
90

Use javascript String() function.

 String(yourobject); //returns [object Object]

or

JSON.stringify(yourobject)

.

  • 19
    var foo = {bar: 1}; String(foo); -> "[object Object]" – Anti Veeranna May 3 '16 at 6:56
  • 1
    var foo = {bar: 1}; String(foo['bar']); -> "1" – Vikram Pote May 3 '16 at 10:23
  • 2
    If you want whole object as string use JSON.stringify(foo) – Vikram Pote May 3 '16 at 10:24
  • @VikramPote I dont think there is a way to retrieve an object to real state from "[object Object]".. – techie_28 May 18 '16 at 6:08
  • 5
    JSON.stringify(yourobject) maid my day! – TranslucentCloud Jul 29 '16 at 12:58
85

Sure, to convert an object into a string, you either have to use your own method, such as:

function objToString (obj) {
    var str = '';
    for (var p in obj) {
        if (obj.hasOwnProperty(p)) {
            str += p + '::' + obj[p] + '\n';
        }
    }
    return str;
}

Actually, the above just shows the general approach; you may wish to use something like http://phpjs.org/functions/var_export:578 or http://phpjs.org/functions/var_dump:604

or, if you are not using methods (functions as properties of your object), you may be able to use the new standard (but not implemented in older browsers, though you can find a utility to help with it for them too), JSON.stringify(). But again, that won't work if the object uses functions or other properties which aren't serializable to JSON.

71

Keeping it simple with console, you can just use a comma instead of a +. The + will try to convert the object into a string, whereas the comma will display it separately in the console.

Example:

var o = {a:1, b:2};
console.log(o);
console.log('Item: ' + o);
console.log('Item: ', o);   // :)

Output:

Object { a=1, b=2}           // useful
Item: [object Object]        // not useful
Item:  Object {a: 1, b: 2}   // Best of both worlds! :)

Reference: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/Console.log

  • Greate solution! But could u tell me what happens behind the scenes when you simply do this : console.log(o) ? Since if you try to log an object added to a string , it actually calls toString() on the object. – Gocy015 Nov 29 '16 at 3:29
  • 1
    console.log ultimately calls something called the Printer which the spec notes: "How the implementation prints args is up to the implementation" - meaning that every browser can do this different (see console.spec.whatwg.org/#printer). Firefox will display objects as a string, but colored nicely. Chrome will display the object as an interactive group that you can expand to see the properties. Give it a try! – Luke Nov 29 '16 at 16:53
  • 2
    Very nice trick and probably fine for modern web browers, but it isn't 100% reliable for all JS implementations. e.g. in Qt QML, which implements a JS engine, the output for console.log('Item: ', o); is still Item: [object Object]. – Paul Masri-Stone Mar 20 '17 at 10:48
32

EDIT Do not use this answer as it does not work in Internet Explorer. Use Gary Chambers solution.

toSource() is the function you are looking for which will write it out as JSON.

var object = {};
object.first = "test";
object.second = "test2";
alert(object.toSource());
  • 6
    Though it is convenient for debugging in Firefox, toSource() does not work in IE. – Brett Zamir Apr 10 '11 at 15:42
  • 4
    toSource() is not a recognised standard, so cannot be guaranteed to be supported in all browsers. – Gary Chambers Apr 10 '11 at 15:46
  • 10
    Ahh, thank you for pointing that out. I will leave my answer here for others who are unaware of that. – Gazler Apr 10 '11 at 15:47
  • I wish I could upvote you more, as this is a brilliant solution for environments that have javascript (but the console log is inconvenient/impossible to access). – Zack Morris Nov 21 '14 at 21:25
  • .toSource() doesn't work in Node 4.x either – NeuroScr Oct 2 '15 at 0:59
30

One option:

console.log('Item: ' + JSON.stringify(o));

o is printed as a string

Another option (as soktinpk pointed out in the comments), and better for console debugging IMO:

console.log('Item: ', o);

o is printed as an object, which you could drill down if you had more fields

20

None of the solutions here worked for me. JSON.stringify seems to be what a lot of people say, but it cuts out functions and seems pretty broken for some objects and arrays I tried when testing it.

I made my own solution which works in Chrome at least. Posting it here so anyone that looks this up on Google can find it.

//Make an object a string that evaluates to an equivalent object
//  Note that eval() seems tricky and sometimes you have to do
//  something like eval("a = " + yourString), then use the value
//  of a.
//
//  Also this leaves extra commas after everything, but JavaScript
//  ignores them.
function convertToText(obj) {
    //create an array that will later be joined into a string.
    var string = [];

    //is object
    //    Both arrays and objects seem to return "object"
    //    when typeof(obj) is applied to them. So instead
    //    I am checking to see if they have the property
    //    join, which normal objects don't have but
    //    arrays do.
    if (typeof(obj) == "object" && (obj.join == undefined)) {
        string.push("{");
        for (prop in obj) {
            string.push(prop, ": ", convertToText(obj[prop]), ",");
        };
        string.push("}");

    //is array
    } else if (typeof(obj) == "object" && !(obj.join == undefined)) {
        string.push("[")
        for(prop in obj) {
            string.push(convertToText(obj[prop]), ",");
        }
        string.push("]")

    //is function
    } else if (typeof(obj) == "function") {
        string.push(obj.toString())

    //all other values can be done with JSON.stringify
    } else {
        string.push(JSON.stringify(obj))
    }

    return string.join("")
}

EDIT: I know this code can be improved but just never got around to doing it. User andrey suggested an improvement here with the comment:

Here is a little bit changed code, which can handle 'null' and 'undefined', and also do not add excessive commas.

Use that at your own risk as I haven't verified it at all. Feel free to suggest any additional improvements as a comment.

  • You are missing some '}'s – dacopenhagen Aug 29 '14 at 16:06
  • 2
    Very nice code, but there is a trailing , at the end of each object/array. – NiCk Newman Jul 28 '15 at 18:25
  • this is the best answer – Roman Jan 19 '16 at 8:41
19

If you're just outputting to the console, you can use console.log('string:', obj). Notice the comma.

  • This poses problems in scenarios where AJAX and deferred come to play - output from console.log is often displayed after AJAX has finished supplying the array with data in parallel, which leads to misleading results. In such cases cloning or serializing objects is the way to go: since we logged duplicated object, even when AJAX finishes its work, it will fill "old" data. – rr- Oct 15 '14 at 18:24
15

In cases where you know the object is just a Boolean, Date, String, number etc... The javascript String() function works just fine. I recently found this useful in dealing with values coming from jquery's $.each function.

For example the following would convert all items in "value" to a string:

$.each(this, function (name, value) {
  alert(String(value));
});

More details here:

http://www.w3schools.com/jsref/jsref_string.asp

  • Or var my_string = ''+value+''; – John Magnolia Jul 24 '13 at 22:36
  • 1
    Works for me. I prefer this solution because I wouldn't use a plugin for such a simple task. – Tillito Sep 15 '13 at 12:54
13
var obj={
name:'xyz',
Address:'123, Somestreet'
 }
var convertedString=JSON.stringify(obj) 
 console.log("literal object is",obj ,typeof obj);
 console.log("converted string :",convertedString);
 console.log(" convertedString type:",typeof convertedString);
  • Have a look in this example here: var obj={ name:"sunny", address:"bangalore" } var temp=JSON.stringify(obj); var temp1=JSON.toString(obj); console.log("this is obj",obj,typeof obj); //format {JSON} type object console.log("this is temp",temp,typeof temp); //format {JSON}type string console.log("this is temp1",temp1,typeof temp1); //format [object JSON] type string Here i have a literal object ,Using JSON.stringify function to convert JSON object into the JSON Sting. we can also use toString function for the conversion but the String format will be [object JSON]. – sunny rai May 8 '17 at 18:13
11

I was looking for this, and wrote a deep recursive one with indentation :

function objToString(obj, ndeep) {
  if(obj == null){ return String(obj); }
  switch(typeof obj){
    case "string": return '"'+obj+'"';
    case "function": return obj.name || obj.toString();
    case "object":
      var indent = Array(ndeep||1).join('\t'), isArray = Array.isArray(obj);
      return '{['[+isArray] + Object.keys(obj).map(function(key){
           return '\n\t' + indent + key + ': ' + objToString(obj[key], (ndeep||1)+1);
         }).join(',') + '\n' + indent + '}]'[+isArray];
    default: return obj.toString();
  }
}

Usage : objToString({ a: 1, b: { c: "test" } })

  • note that if you want to prevent infinite loops for objects with circular references, you may add if(ndeep > MAX_DEPTH_LEVEL){ return '...'; } in the function, with MAX_DEPTH_LEVEL being your chosen max number of object layers to dig in. – SylvainPV Mar 15 '15 at 16:43
10

If you just want to see the object for debugging, you can use

var o = {a:1, b:2} 
console.dir(o)
7

1.

JSON.stringify(o);

Item: {"a":"1", "b":"2"}

2.

var o = {a:1, b:2};
var b=[]; Object.keys(o).forEach(function(k){b.push(k+":"+o[k]);});
b="{"+b.join(', ')+"}";
console.log('Item: ' + b);

Item: {a:1, b:2}

  • 1
    It would be better if you consider adding more details about your answer. – Harun Diluka Heshan Mar 4 '18 at 16:49
6

JSON methods are quite inferior to the Gecko engine .toSource() primitive.

See the SO article response for comparison tests.

Also, the answer above refers to http://forums.devshed.com/javascript-development-115/tosource-with-arrays-in-ie-386109.html which, like JSON, (which the other article http://www.davidpirek.com/blog/object-to-string-how-to-deserialize-json uses via "ExtJs JSON encode source code") cannot handle circular references and is incomplete. The code below shows it's (spoof's) limitations (corrected to handle arrays and objects without content).

(direct link to code in //forums.devshed.com/ ... /tosource-with-arrays-in-ie-386109)

javascript:
Object.prototype.spoof=function(){
    if (this instanceof String){
      return '(new String("'+this.replace(/"/g, '\\"')+'"))';
    }
    var str=(this instanceof Array)
        ? '['
        : (this instanceof Object)
            ? '{'
            : '(';
    for (var i in this){
      if (this[i] != Object.prototype.spoof) {
        if (this instanceof Array == false) {
          str+=(i.match(/\W/))
              ? '"'+i.replace('"', '\\"')+'":'
              : i+':';
        }
        if (typeof this[i] == 'string'){
          str+='"'+this[i].replace('"', '\\"');
        }
        else if (this[i] instanceof Date){
          str+='new Date("'+this[i].toGMTString()+'")';
        }
        else if (this[i] instanceof Array || this[i] instanceof Object){
          str+=this[i].spoof();
        }
        else {
          str+=this[i];
        }
        str+=', ';
      }
    };
    str=/* fix */(str.length>2?str.substring(0, str.length-2):str)/* -ed */+(
        (this instanceof Array)
        ? ']'
        : (this instanceof Object)
            ? '}'
            : ')'
    );
    return str;
  };
for(i in objRA=[
    [   'Simple Raw Object source code:',
        '[new Array, new Object, new Boolean, new Number, ' +
            'new String, new RegExp, new Function, new Date]'   ] ,

    [   'Literal Instances source code:',
        '[ [], {}, true, 1, "", /./, function(){}, new Date() ]'    ] ,

    [   'some predefined entities:',
        '[JSON, Math, null, Infinity, NaN, ' +
            'void(0), Function, Array, Object, undefined]'      ]
    ])
alert([
    '\n\n\ntesting:',objRA[i][0],objRA[i][1],
    '\n.toSource()',(obj=eval(objRA[i][1])).toSource(),
    '\ntoSource() spoof:',obj.spoof()
].join('\n'));

which displays:

testing:
Simple Raw Object source code:
[new Array, new Object, new Boolean, new Number, new String,
          new RegExp, new Function, new Date]

.toSource()
[[], {}, (new Boolean(false)), (new Number(0)), (new String("")),
          /(?:)/, (function anonymous() {}), (new Date(1303248037722))]

toSource() spoof:
[[], {}, {}, {}, (new String("")),
          {}, {}, new Date("Tue, 19 Apr 2011 21:20:37 GMT")]

and

testing:
Literal Instances source code:
[ [], {}, true, 1, "", /./, function(){}, new Date() ]

.toSource()
[[], {}, true, 1, "", /./, (function () {}), (new Date(1303248055778))]

toSource() spoof:
[[], {}, true, 1, ", {}, {}, new Date("Tue, 19 Apr 2011 21:20:55 GMT")]

and

testing:
some predefined entities:
[JSON, Math, null, Infinity, NaN, void(0), Function, Array, Object, undefined]

.toSource()
[JSON, Math, null, Infinity, NaN, (void 0),
       function Function() {[native code]}, function Array() {[native code]},
              function Object() {[native code]}, (void 0)]

toSource() spoof:
[{}, {}, null, Infinity, NaN, undefined, {}, {}, {}, undefined]
  • the obj.toSource() was just what I needed, thank you – Timo Huovinen Jun 7 '12 at 12:36
4

As firefox does not stringify some object as screen object ; if you want to have the same result such as : JSON.stringify(obj) :

function objToString (obj) {
    var tabjson=[];
    for (var p in obj) {
        if (obj.hasOwnProperty(p)) {
            tabjson.push('"'+p +'"'+ ':' + obj[p]);
        }
    }  tabjson.push()
    return '{'+tabjson.join(',')+'}';
}
3

Take a look at the jQuery-JSON plugin

At its core, it uses JSON.stringify but falls back to its own parser if the browser doesn't implement it.

3

If you only care about strings, objects, and arrays:

function objectToString (obj) {
        var str = '';
        var i=0;
        for (var key in obj) {
            if (obj.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
                if(typeof obj[key] == 'object')
                {
                    if(obj[key] instanceof Array)
                    {
                        str+= key + ' : [ ';
                        for(var j=0;j<obj[key].length;j++)
                        {
                            if(typeof obj[key][j]=='object') {
                                str += '{' + objectToString(obj[key][j]) + (j > 0 ? ',' : '') + '}';
                            }
                            else
                            {
                                str += '\'' + obj[key][j] + '\'' + (j > 0 ? ',' : ''); //non objects would be represented as strings
                            }
                        }
                        str+= ']' + (i > 0 ? ',' : '')
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        str += key + ' : { ' + objectToString(obj[key]) + '} ' + (i > 0 ? ',' : '');
                    }
                }
                else {
                    str +=key + ':\'' + obj[key] + '\'' + (i > 0 ? ',' : '');
                }
                i++;
            }
        }
        return str;
    }
3

stringify-object is a good npm library made by the yeoman team: https://www.npmjs.com/package/stringify-object

npm install stringify-object

then:

const stringifyObject = require('stringify-object');
stringifyObject(myCircularObject);

Obviously it's interesting only if you have circular object that would fail with JSON.stringify();

  • 1
    Why would anyone use an NPM module for something like this, which can be achieved by a one-liner in plain JS? This answer needs details about why anyone would do so. – Zelphir Oct 12 '18 at 11:28
  • As often, a lib would help in edge case. I used it to deal with circular references. – Nicolas Zozol Oct 15 '18 at 7:04
  • 1
    This makes more sense with the added note about circular objects, removing my downvote. – Zelphir Oct 15 '18 at 8:16
2
var o = {a:1, b:2};

o.toString=function(){
  return 'a='+this.a+', b='+this.b;
};

console.log(o);
console.log('Item: ' + o);

Since Javascript v1.0 works everywhere (even IE) this is a native approach and allows for a very costomised look of your object while debugging and in production https://developer.mozilla.org/en/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Object/toString

Usefull example

var Ship=function(n,x,y){
  this.name = n;
  this.x = x;
  this.y = y;
};
Ship.prototype.toString=function(){
  return '"'+this.name+'" located at: x:'+this.x+' y:'+this.y;
};

alert([new Ship('Star Destroyer', 50.001, 53.201),
new Ship('Millennium Falcon', 123.987, 287.543),
new Ship('TIE fighter', 83.060, 102.523)].join('\n'));//now they can battle!
//"Star Destroyer" located at: x:50.001 y:53.201
//"Millennium Falcon" located at: x:123.987 y:287.543
//"TIE fighter" located at: x:83.06 y:102.523

Also, as a bonus

function ISO8601Date(){
  return this.getFullYear()+'-'+(this.getMonth()+1)+'-'+this.getDate();
}
var d=new Date();
d.toString=ISO8601Date;//demonstrates altering native object behaviour
alert(d);
//IE6   Fri Jul 29 04:21:26 UTC+1200 2016
//FF&GC Fri Jul 29 2016 04:21:26 GMT+1200 (New Zealand Standard Time)
//d.toString=ISO8601Date; 2016-7-29
1

If you are using the Dojo javascript framework then there is already a build in function to do this: dojo.toJson() which would be used like so.

var obj = {
  name: 'myObj'
};
dojo.toJson(obj);

which will return a string. If you want to convert the object to json data then add a second parameter of true.

dojo.toJson(obj, true);

http://dojotoolkit.org/reference-guide/dojo/toJson.html#dojo-tojson

1
/*
    This function is as JSON.Stringify (but if you has not in your js-engine you can use this)
    Params:
        obj - your object
        inc_ident - can be " " or "\t".
        show_types - show types of object or not
        ident - need for recoursion but you can not set this parameter.
*/
function getAsText(obj, inc_ident, show_types, ident) {
    var res = "";
    if (!ident)
        ident = "";
    if (typeof(obj) == "string") {
        res += "\"" + obj + "\" ";
        res += (show_types == true) ? "/* typeobj: " + typeof(obj) + "*/" : "";
    } else if (typeof(obj) == "number" || typeof(obj) == "boolean") {
        res += obj;
        res += (show_types == true) ? "/* typeobj: " + typeof(obj) + "*/" : "";
    } else if (obj instanceof Array) {
        res += "[ ";
        res += show_types ? "/* typeobj: " + typeof(obj) + "*/" : "";
        res += "\r\n";
        var new_ident = ident + inc_ident;
        var arr = [];
        for(var key in obj) {
            arr.push(new_ident + getAsText(obj[key], inc_ident, show_types, new_ident));
        } 
        res += arr.join(",\r\n") + "\r\n";
        res += ident + "]";
    } else {
        var new_ident = ident + inc_ident;      
        res += "{ ";
        res += (show_types == true) ? "/* typeobj: " + typeof(obj) + "*/" : "";
        res += "\r\n";
        var arr = [];
        for(var key in obj) {
            arr.push(new_ident + '"' + key + "\" : " + getAsText(obj[key], inc_ident, show_types, new_ident));
        }
        res += arr.join(",\r\n") + "\r\n";
        res += ident + "}\r\n";
    } 
    return res;
};

example to use:

var obj = {
    str : "hello",
    arr : ["1", "2", "3", 4],
b : true,
    vobj : {
        str : "hello2"
    }
}

var ForReading = 1, ForWriting = 2;
var fso = new ActiveXObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")
f1 = fso.OpenTextFile("your_object1.txt", ForWriting, true)
f1.Write(getAsText(obj, "\t"));
f1.Close();

f2 = fso.OpenTextFile("your_object2.txt", ForWriting, true)
f2.Write(getAsText(obj, "\t", true));
f2.Close();

your_object1.txt:

{ 
    "str" : "hello" ,
    "arr" : [ 
        "1" ,
        "2" ,
        "3" ,
        4
    ],
    "b" : true,
    "vobj" : { 
        "str" : "hello2" 
    }

}

your_object2.txt:

{ /* typeobj: object*/
    "str" : "hello" /* typeobj: string*/,
    "arr" : [ /* typeobj: object*/
        "1" /* typeobj: string*/,
        "2" /* typeobj: string*/,
        "3" /* typeobj: string*/,
        4/* typeobj: number*/
    ],
    "b" : true/* typeobj: boolean*/,
    "vobj" : { /* typeobj: object*/
        "str" : "hello2" /* typeobj: string*/
    }

}
  • 1
    It would be good and explanation of what the code does and an example of how to use it. Thanks – estemendoza Oct 21 '14 at 21:09
  • estemendoza, ok! I changed comment, thanks for you – sea-kg Oct 23 '14 at 4:52
1

For your example, I think console.log("Item:",o) would be easiest. But, console.log("Item:" + o.toString) would also work.

Using method number one uses a nice dropdown in the console, so a long object would work nicely.

1

For non-nested objects:

Object.entries(o).map(x=>x.join(":")).join("\r\n")
0
function objToString (obj) {
    var str = '{';
    if(typeof obj=='object')
      {

        for (var p in obj) {
          if (obj.hasOwnProperty(p)) {
              str += p + ':' + objToString (obj[p]) + ',';
          }
      }
    }
      else
      {
         if(typeof obj=='string')
          {
            return '"'+obj+'"';
          }
          else
          {
            return obj+'';
          }
      }



    return str.substring(0,str.length-1)+"}";
}
0

I hope this example will help for all those who all are working on array of objects

var data_array = [{
                    "id": "0",
                    "store": "ABC"
                },{
                    "id":"1",
                    "store":"XYZ"
                }];
console.log(String(data_array[1]["id"]+data_array[1]["store"]));
0

If you can use lodash you can do it this way:

> var o = {a:1, b:2};
> '{' + _.map(o, (value, key) => key + ':' + value).join(', ') + '}'
'{a:1, b:2}'

With lodash map() you can iterate over Objects as well. This maps every key/value entry to its string representation:

> _.map(o, (value, key) => key + ':' + value)
[ 'a:1', 'b:2' ]

And join() put the array entries together.

If you can use ES6 Template String, this works also:

> `{${_.map(o, (value, key) => `${key}:${value}`).join(', ')}}`
'{a:1, b:2}'

Please note this do not goes recursive through the Object:

> var o = {a:1, b:{c:2}}
> _.map(o, (value, key) => `${key}:${value}`)
[ 'a:1', 'b:[object Object]' ]

Like node's util.inspect() will do:

> util.inspect(o)
'{ a: 1, b: { c: 2 } }'
0

If you wont aplay join() to Object.

const obj = {one:1, two:2, three:3};
let arr = [];
for(let p in obj)
    arr.push(obj[p]);
const str = arr.join(',');
0

If you want a minimalist method of converting a variable to a string for an inline expression type situation, ''+variablename is the best I have golfed.

If 'variablename' is an object and you use the empty string concatenation operation, it will give the annoying [object Object], in which case you probably want Gary C.'s enormously upvoted JSON.stringify answer to the posted question, which you can read about on Mozilla's Developer Network at the link in that answer at the top.

0

I had need to make a more configurable version of JSON.stringify as I had to add comments and know the JSON path:

const someObj = {
  a: {
    nested: {
      value: 'apple',
    },
    sibling: 'peanut'
  },
  b: {
    languages: ['en', 'de', 'fr'],
    c: {
      nice: 'heh'
    }
  },
  c: 'butter',
  d: function () {}
};

function* objIter(obj, indent = '  ', depth = 0, path = '') {
  const t = indent.repeat(depth);
  const t1 = indent.repeat(depth + 1);
  const v = v => JSON.stringify(v);
  yield { type: Array.isArray(obj) ? 'OPEN_ARR' : 'OPEN_OBJ', indent, depth };
  const keys = Object.keys(obj);
  
  for (let i = 0, l = keys.length; i < l; i++) {
    const key = keys[i];
    const prop = obj[key];
    const nextPath = !path && key || `${path}.${key}`;
 
    if (typeof prop !== 'object') {
      yield { type:  isNaN(key) ? 'VAL' : 'ARR_VAL', key, prop, indent, depth, path: nextPath };
    } else {
      yield { type: 'OBJ_KEY', key, indent, depth, path: nextPath };
      yield* objIter(prop, indent, depth + 1, nextPath);
    }
  }

  yield { type: Array.isArray(obj) ? 'CLOSE_ARR' : 'CLOSE_OBJ', indent, depth };
}

const iterMap = (it, mapFn) => {
  const arr = [];
  for (const x of it) { arr.push(mapFn(x)) }
  return arr;
}

const objToStr = obj => iterMap(objIter(obj), ({ type, key, prop, indent, depth, path }) => {
  const t = indent.repeat(depth);
  const t1 = indent.repeat(depth + 1);
  const v = v => JSON.stringify(v);

  switch (type) {
    case 'OPEN_ARR':
      return '[\n';
    case 'OPEN_OBJ':
      return '{\n';
    case 'VAL':
      return `${t1}// ${path}\n${t1}${v(key)}: ${v(prop)},\n`;
    case 'ARR_VAL':
      return `${t1}// ${path}\n${t1}${v(prop)},\n`;
    case 'OBJ_KEY':
      return `${t1}// ${path}\n${t1}${v(key)}: `;
    case 'CLOSE_ARR':
    case 'CLOSE_OBJ':
      return `${t}${type === 'CLOSE_ARR' ? ']' : '}'}${depth ? ',' : ';'}\n`;
    default:
      throw new Error('Unknown type:', type);
  }
}).join('');

const s = objToStr(someObj);
console.log(s);

0

If all you want is to simply get a string output, then this should work: String(object)

protected by Yvette Colomb Dec 29 '18 at 23:54

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