8

Can I force std::vector to not deallocate its memory after the vector goes out of scope?

For example, if I have

int* foo() {
    std::vector<int> v(10,1); // trivial vector
    return &v[0];
}

int main()
{
    int* bar = foo();
    std::cout << bar[5] << std::endl;
}

There is no guarantee that the values will still be accessible here.

I am currently simply doing this

int* foo() {
  std::vector<int> v(10,1);
  int* w = new int[10];
  for (int i=0; i<10; i++) {
    w[i] = v[i];
  }
  return w;
}

but it is a little wasteful to repopulate a whole new array. Is there a way to force std::vector to not delete its array?

Note: I am not returning the vector itself because I am interfacing c++ with python using SWIG, and ARG_OUTVIEW_ARRAY requires a raw pointer and, in fact, an intentional memory leak. I would still however like to be able to make use of vector features while constructing the data itself.

  • why does foo not return an int ? Eventually someone has to store the value... – idclev 463035818 May 14 '19 at 10:09
  • 3
    @TheZhengmeister: why not std::vector<int> v = new std::vector<int>(10,1); in foo? – P.W May 14 '19 at 10:17
  • 1
    Why not just use a raw array with SWIG? It is possible. – rustyx May 14 '19 at 10:25
  • 2
    @TheZhengmeister No, this is a terrible idea. If you return &(*v)[0], you'll leak the vector itself, even if you free its internal array. – HolyBlackCat May 14 '19 at 10:31
  • 1
    %include <std_vector.i> then %template(IntVector) std::vector<int>; will allow passing and return of vectors. – Mark Tolonen May 15 '19 at 13:46
4
0

The vector is desiged to prevent leaks.

But if you want to shoot yourself in the foot, it's possible. Here's how you prevent the vector from deallocating its internal array:

int *foo()
{
    std::vector<int> v(10,1);

    int *ret = v.data();
    new (&v) std::vector<int>; // Replace `v` with an empty vector. Old storage is leaked.
    return ret;
}

As the other answers say, you should never do it.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This is much more easier and cleaner than using custom allocator. Thanks. – taskinoor May 14 '19 at 11:12
  • 3
    I'm pretty sure that's UB, but granted that should hopefully work on common runtimes... – Quentin May 14 '19 at 13:18
  • @Quentin One could get UB when delete[]ing the pointer later, if for some reason v[0] is not at the beginning of the allocated storage. I think placement-new itself is well-defined here, since one is allowed to destroy objects by reusing their storage. Also, if vector manages some other resource in addition to a single block of heap memory, we leak that. Does that sound correct? – HolyBlackCat May 14 '19 at 13:31
  • 2
    @HolyBlackCat deletion should use the exact same form that std::vector uses internally, allocators and all -- would probably match delete[] in the plain case, but is not guaranteed to. I'm unsure whether cutting the lifetime of a non-trivially-destructible object short through placement-new is well-defined. – Quentin May 14 '19 at 13:36
9
0

It is possible but you should never do it. Forcing a vector to leave memory leak is a terrible idea and if you need such a thing then you need to re-think your design. std::vector is a resource managing type whose one of the main goals is to ensure that we don't have a leak. Never try to break that.

Now, to answer your specific question: std::vector takes an allocator type as second template parameter which is default to std::allocator<T>. Now you can write a custom allocator that doesn't release any memory and use that with your vector. Writing a custom allocator is not very trivial work, so I'm not going to describe that here (but you can Google to find the tutorials).

If you really want to use custom allocator then you must ensure that your vector never triggers a grow operation. Cause during growing capacity the vector will move/copy data to new location and release the old memories using the allocator. If you use an allocator that leaks then during growing you not only retain the final data, but also retain the old memories which I'm sure that you don't want to retain. So make sure that you create the vector with full capacity.

| improve this answer | |
4
0

No.

Vectors are not implemented to have memory leaks, and the interface does not provide a way to create one.

You can't "steal" the memory (removing ownership of it from the vector), which is possibly a bit of a shame.

Sorry, but you are going to have to either copy (as you're doing now), or not use vector.

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    What about using a custom allocator that doesn't free memory? I know that it's a terrible idea but should be possible to implement. – taskinoor May 14 '19 at 10:13
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    I'm not going to entertain such hackery! – Lightness Races in Orbit May 14 '19 at 10:15
  • 1
    Lol. Yes, such hackery should be avoided but it is technically possible. At least may be just for fun :-) – taskinoor May 14 '19 at 10:17
3
0

This is a bad idea, but possible by creating a custom allocator that does not deallocate as said in other answers.

For example : (boilerplate mostly from cppref)

#include <cstdlib>
#include <new>
#include <vector>

template <typename T>
struct LeakingAllocator 
{
  using value_type = T;
  LeakingAllocator() = default;

  template <typename U> constexpr LeakingAllocator(const LeakingAllocator<U>&) noexcept {}

  T* allocate(std::size_t n) 
  {
    if(n > std::size_t(-1) / sizeof(T)) throw std::bad_alloc(); // check for overflow

    if(auto p = static_cast<T*>(std::malloc(n*sizeof(T)))) return p; // return p if malloc returns a valid object
    throw std::bad_alloc(); // otherwise just throw.
  }

  void deallocate(T* p, std::size_t) noexcept { /*leak intentionally*/ }
};


template <typename T, typename U>
bool operator==(const LeakingAllocator<T>&, const LeakingAllocator<U>&) { return true; }
template <typename T, typename U>
bool operator!=(const LeakingAllocator<T>&, const LeakingAllocator<U>&) { return false; }

template <typename T>
using LeakingVector = std::vector<T, LeakingAllocator<T>>;

Then code like

int* ret()
{
    LeakingVector<int> a;
    a.resize(10);
    return &a[0];
}

int main()
{
    auto ptr = ret();
    *ptr = 10;
    std::cout << *ptr;
}

becomes valid.

| improve this answer | |
2
0

Not sure but, yes.

You can create a custum allocator who do nothing when deallocate => leak

Or may be you can jsut create your vectoron the heap so it will leak anyway.

int* foo() {
    std::vector<int>* v = new std::vector<int>(10,1); 
    return &((*v)[0]);
    // no delete
}

int main()
{
    int* bar = foo();
    std::cout << bar[5] << std::endl;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • The second option would create an actual leak (rather than removing ownership of the buffer from vector, which is what OP seems to want). – HolyBlackCat May 14 '19 at 10:23
  • This introduces far too much risk of accidentally leaking more than the desired amount of memory. Also, you don't have a strategy for eventually freeing the memory once you're done with it. This is a terrible idea. – user2357112 supports Monica May 14 '19 at 10:24
  • Of course it's a terrible idea, but OP want to create a leak, I help him doing so ^^ – Martin Morterol May 14 '19 at 10:26
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    The question title is misleading. OP seems to want to reuse a buffer form a vector, not leak it. – HolyBlackCat May 14 '19 at 10:29
  • 1
    @TheZhengmeister the example shown here will in addition to the array leak the vector object itself. Don't use it. – rustyx May 14 '19 at 15:03
0
0

No.

And you're doing it wrong. Return the vector instead so the lifetime works out:

Write your own special Python memory vector class, something like (most crudely):

template <typename T>
class python_vector
{
    T* buffer_;
public:
    python_vector(size_t n, const T& value) : buffer_{new T(n)}
    {}
    // copy, assignment, operator[](), *etc*
    ~python_vector()
    {
        // DO NOTHING!
    }
}

python_vector<int> foo() {      
    python_vector<int> v(10,1);
    // process v
    return v;
}

int main()
{
    python_vector<int> bar = foo();  // copy allusion will build only one python_vector here
    std::cout << bar[5] << std::endl;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    OP mentioned why he does not return a vector in a note at the end of the question. – P.W May 14 '19 at 10:27
  • 1
    @P.W But he wants the vector data to outlive that return? Design is wrong. – Paul Evans May 14 '19 at 10:28
  • 1
    Yes, I agree with you. – P.W May 14 '19 at 10:31
  • I need the data to outlive the return because SWIG needs a 'memory leak' so that python can take control of the memory and then deallocate it after the lifetime of the c++. – jxz12 May 14 '19 at 10:33
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    @TheZhengmeister Then vector is the wrong tool. Allocate and manage the memory in a way you can control so that it doesn't get freed in a C++ lifetime. – Paul Evans May 14 '19 at 10:37
0
0

In C++ you would most probably write:

auto foo()
{
    std::vector<int> v(10,1); // trivial vector
    return v;
}

int main()
{
    const auto bar = foo();
    std::cout << bar[5] << std::endl;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • I need a raw pointer because I am using SWIG to interface the c++ with python, which transfers the memory management to python after c++ goes out of scope. It needs to be a 'leak' because otherwise the OS might just overwrite the allocated memory. – jxz12 May 14 '19 at 13:47
  • I don't think, Python is able to correctly manage memory allocated by a C++ run-time. Perhaps you should obtain memory from Python and copy the vector data into it. – CAF May 14 '19 at 16:33

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