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I'm attempting to implement a function to build up a Braun tree with n elements using the following function in Coq, but Coq gives me the error that it cannot guess decreasing argument of fix:

Fixpoint copy (x : V) (n : nat) : BraunTree :=
let
  fix copy2 (a : V) (i : nat) : (BraunTree * BraunTree) := 
    match i with
    | 0 => (T a E E,E) 
    | _ => match Nat.odd i with
           | true => let m := ((i - 1) / 2) in 
                     let (s,t) := copy2 a m in
                     ((T a s t),(T a t t)) 
           | false => let m := ((i - 2) / 2) in
                      let (s,t) := copy2 a m in
                     ((T a s s),(T a s t)) 
           end
    end
in
match copy2 x n with
|(_,snd) => snd
end.

I know that it is not the separate even and odd cases that is the problem because it gave the same error when I removed the even/odd cases:

Fixpoint copy (x : V) (n : nat) : BraunTree :=
let
  fix copy2 (a : V) (i : nat) : (BraunTree * BraunTree) := 
    match i with
    | 0 => (T a E E,E) 
    | _ => let m := ((i - 1) / 2) in 
                     let (s,t) := copy2 a m in
                     ((T a s t),(T a t t)) 
    end
in
match copy2 x n with
|(_,snd) => snd
end.

How can I convince Coq that i is in fact a decreasing argument?

EDIT Type of BraunTree:

Inductive BraunTree : Type :=
| E : BraunTree
| T: V -> BraunTree -> BraunTree -> BraunTree.

4

Fixpoint/fix only allows recursive calls on a syntactically smaller argument.

Fixpoint example (n : nat) :=
  ... (* There must be a match on [n] somewhere *)
    ... match n with
        | O => base_case (* no recursive call allowed *)
        | S m =>
          ... (example m)
          (* We can only call [example] on [m], or some even smaller value obtained by matching on [m] *)
         end ...

In particular, it's not allowed to make a recursive call on a value obtained via some arbitrary function (in this case, div and sub in copy2 a ((i-1) / 2)).

Here are three options:

  1. Pick another representation of natural numbers so that pattern-matching on it naturally decomposes into the different branches of the desired definition (base case (zero), even, odd).

  2. Use the fact that the recursion depth is actually bounded by n, so we can use n as "fuel", which we know will not actually deplete before we are done.

  3. Cunningly extract a subterm of the decreasing argument to make the recursive call. This solution is less general and robust than the previous ones; it's a much harder fight against the termination checker.


Alternative representation

We have three cases: zero, even, and odd. Luckily the standard library has a type with almost the same structure, positive:

Inductive positive :=    (* p > 0 *)
| xH                     (* 1 *)
| xI (p : positive)      (* 2p + 1 *)
| xO (p : positive)      (* 2p     *)
.

Pointing the type positive with an additional zero, we get N:

Inductive N :=
| N0                      (* 0 *)
| Npos (p : positive)     (* p > 0 *)
.

There is also a conversion function N.of_nat : nat -> N, although it might also be a good idea to use N everywhere instead of nat, if the conversions become too annoying.

The final definition starts by case analysis on N, and the case revealing a positive number is handled with a fix-point, where the base case is 1 instead of 0. We have to shift some details, because the even case is 2p instead of 2p+2, so instead of a pair of trees of size (i+1,i) we have to do (i-1,i). But overall the recursive cases still naturally match an informal specification:

Require Import NArith PArith.

Parameter V : Type.

Inductive BraunTree : Type :=
| E : BraunTree
| T: V -> BraunTree -> BraunTree -> BraunTree.

Definition copy (x : V) (n : N) : BraunTree :=
  match n with
  | N0 => E
  | Npos p =>
    let
      (* copy2 a i : a tree of (i-1) copies of a, and another of i copies of a *)
      fix copy2 (a : V) (i : positive) : (BraunTree * BraunTree) := 
        match i with

        | xH => (* i = 1 *)
          (E, T a E E)

        | xI p => (* i = 2p + 1 *)
          let (s,t) := copy2 a p in
          ((T a t s),(T a t t))

        | xO p => (* i = 2p *)
          let (s,t) := copy2 a p in
          ((T a s s),(T a t s))

        end
    in
    match copy2 x p with
    |(_,snd) => snd
    end
  end.

Just enough fuel

We add fuel to the fix as the decreasing argument. We can only run out if n = i = 0, so we know what the result should be then.

(* note: This doesn't need to be a Fixpoint *)
Definition copy (x : V) (n : nat) : BraunTree :=
let
  fix copy2 (a : V) (n : nat) (i : nat) : (BraunTree * BraunTree)  := 
    match n with
    | O => (T a E E,E)
    | S n' =>
      match i with
      | O => (T a E E,E) 
      | _ =>
        if Nat.odd i then
          let m := div2 ((i - 1) / 2) in 
          let (s,t) := copy2 a n' m in
          ((T a s t),(T a t t)) 
        else
          let m := div2 ((i - 2) / 2) in 
          let (s,t) := copy2 a n' m in
          ((T a s s),(T a s t)) 
      end
    end
in
match copy2 x n n with
|(_,snd) => snd
end.

This works nicely when:

  • we can compute the amount of fuel needed;
  • and there is a predictable answer to give when we run out of fuel.

If either of those assumption does not hold, we need to litter our code with option.


Nested recursion

As mentioned earlier, Coq has strict rules about decreasing arguments. The usual explanation is that we can only make a recursive call on a subterm obtained through pattern-matching on the decreasing argument (or transitively, one of its subterms).

One apparent restriction is that, because the condition is syntactic (i.e., Coq looks at the definition to track the provenance of the decreasing argument), the argument n can only decrease by a constant at most (constant with respect to n), since there are only finitely many match in a definition. In particular, there is no way to make a recursive call on the result of a division by two, as that represents a decrease by n/2, a value linear in n.

For better or for worse, Coq's termination criterion is actually a bit smarter than that: one can pass the decreasing argument to a nested fixpoint, and the "subterm" relation will be tracked through it.

Cons-free division

And indeed, the division of a Peano nat can be defined in such a way that Coq can tell that the result is a subterm of the dividend:

Definition div2 (n : nat) :=
  let fix d2 (n1 : nat) (n2 : nat) {struct n1} :=
    match n2 with
    | S (S n2') =>
      match n1 with
      | O => n1
      | S n1' => d2 n1' n2'
      end
    | _ => n1
    end
  in d2 n n.

The idea is to write a fix-point of two arguments (somewhat like the fuel solution), which start out equal (d2 n n), and we remove two S constructors from one (n2) of them for every one S we remove from the other (n1). Important details:

  • In all the non-recursing cases, we return n1 (and not 0 in any case), which is then guaranteed to be a subterm of the topmost n.

  • And the function must be decreasing in n1 (the term we return), rather than n2 (Coq only keeps track of subterms of decreasing arguments).

All that ensures that div2 n is a subterm of n (not a strict subterm (or proper subterm), because n could be O).

This has similarities to the previous fuel-based solution, but here the decreasing argument is a lot more relevant than just a device to trick the typechecker.

This technique is a variant of cons-free programming. (Note though that the constraints are not quite the same as what is discussed in the literature, for example when the focus is on avoiding memory allocations rather than ensuring termination by structural well-foundedness.)

Conclusion: definition of copy

Once we have div2, we can define copy with a few tweaks to obtain i-1 and i-2 as proper subterms of i, again by pattern-matching. Below, i' and i'' are proper subterms of i (by visual inspection), and div2 i' and div2 i'' are subterms of i' and i'' (by the definition of div2). By transitivity they are proper subterms of i, so the termination checker accepts.

Definition copy (x : V) (n : nat) : BraunTree :=
let
  fix copy2 (a : V) (i : nat) : (BraunTree * BraunTree)  := 
    match i with
    | 0 => (T a E E,E) 
    | S i' => (* i' = i-1 *)
      if Nat.odd i then
        let m := div2 i' in 
        let (s,t) := copy2 a m in
        ((T a s t),(T a t t)) 
      else
        match i' with
        | O => (* Unreachable *) (E, E)
        | S i'' => (* i'' = i-2 *)
          let m := div2 i'' in 
          let (s,t) := copy2 a m in
          ((T a s s),(T a s t)) 
        end
    end
in
match copy2 x n with
|(_,snd) => snd
end.

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