81

Is there a linq lambda search method that returns null, instead of throwing an exception, when searching a list?

My current solution is something like: (to avoid exception from being thrown)

if (list.Exists(x => x.Foo == Foo))
{
    var listItem = list.Find(x => x.Foo == Foo);
}

It just feels wrong to repeat the expression.

Something like ...

var listItem = list.Find(x => x.Foo == Foo);
if (listItem != null)
{
    //Do stuff
}

... feels better to me. Or is it just me?

Do you have a better approach on this one? (The solution don't have to be returning null, just a better solution is good)

1
  • Did the behaviour of List<T>.Find change? Current versions of the .Net are allowing the second example. Was List<T>.Find throwing in older verions of the .Net Framework if no matching element was found? – Fabian Jan 27 at 11:04
145
var listItem = list.FirstOrDefault(x => x.Foo == Foo);
if (listItem != null)
{
    //Do stuff
}
54

Bala R's answer is correct, I just wanted to add a piece of information:

Note that if List<T> contains objects that by-design cannot be null, the FirstOrDefault will return something else than null. The compiler is likely to give a warning/error of this at the if statement. In that case you should approach your situation like this:

List<MyObjectThatCannotBeNull> list;
var listItem = list.FirstOrDefault(x => x.Foo == Foo);
if (!listItem.Equals(default(MyObjectThatCannotBeNull)))
{
    //Do stuff
}
1
  • 10
    and don't forget - if your list will contain the default value for that generic type (Default Values Table), you cannot tell if the value exist or not using Find method. You should use FindIndex, Exists or Contains in those situations. – HuBeZa Apr 10 '11 at 17:47

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